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  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: New books #136349

    Here’s another book along the same lines as The Hidden Life of Trees.  Its Eager, the surprising , secret life of Beavers and why they Matter  By Ben Goldfarb.

    I have not finished the book, and likely will not for a while, but so far it has taught me a bunch about the ecology and deep history of beavers and water and their impact on the fertility of the land.  It explained to me my intuitive affection for beavers and why I miss them in our back creek since the coyotes ate them.  Between the neighbors and the coyotes, it was a struggle to give them quarter.  The neighbors could be told to keep out.  The ‘yotes, not so much.  I will give this book to the neighbors in case beavers venture here again.

    Be warned, after reading this book, it would be hard to raise your hand against beavers again.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: Glove vs tab… #136330

    Making your own glove turns out to be a fun thing to do and really improves the fit and function, imo.

    Store bought gloves never really fit your fingers right.  And the cost can start to add up.  I thought making a glove would be really hard, but it wasn’t too bad.

    A couple finger stalls were made before I got the sizing/shape figured out.  But for the cost of a Saturday afternoon I had a nice glove made.

    The glove I made is a hybrid between the neet glove and a hill glove.  What’s nice about it is that it fits MY fingers.  Having everything we need available to us at the click of a button helps us forget that if we do it for ourselves, we can end up with something better.

    I have found that tuning my glove is as important as tuning my arrows, or my bow.  If you are bent crafty, consider making your own 🙂

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    I hear the electric utility companies are having a real hard time recruiting people to fill the lineman’s job as they retire.  There’s a can of worms, in so many ways…

    My closest experience with lightening was in my 20’s as I was driving north on interstate 95 in Florida.  A bolt hit the median, rocked the car, and threw dirt up on the hood and window.  It was like a grenade went off.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    David- Maybe you found a Nexus!  Every now and again I’ve found a spot in the woods that the deer pass through for no explainable reason.  No food, no terrain, no nutten’.  Yet the deer are always passing through.  The only way to find them is by accident.   Nothing to attract the deer, or other hunters makes them great spots.

    Robin- I’m glad you had fun in Paris! My wife, mom, and daughter went for 2 weeks last year.  I begged and begged to go, but they said I had to stay home.  I sat around for two weeks with nothing to do but drink beer and shoot bows and arrows undisturbed.  Boy did I lose out (rolling eyes emoji)

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: New Arras #136133

    Raccoons can be a little too friendly around here too.  I’ve had many opportunities to shoot them with an arrow, but I’ve been reluctant to do it because of  rabies.  Raccoons are a rabies vector species.  I don’t think I want to pick up an arrow covered with Raccoon blood.

    That said, ground hogs are supposed to be a vector species too, and I’ve picked up many arrows covered in their blood with no ill effect.  Oh well, gotta go.  I keep drooling on the keyboard (crazy eyes emoji)

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: New Arras #136123

    That’s a lot of critter stickers!  Those raccoons must have gotten into the chicken coop 🙁

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    Robin is right!  There is no better way to get it figured out than to read THE handbook.  Before getting too far into your gear purchases, I would encourage you to read the book.  It will answer most of your questions and give you a good basic understanding, which will help you evaluate all the free advice you are going to get.  It is an investment that will save you much money in the future.

    Your instinct about carbon arrows is correct.  While they are strong, they are expensive.  It is hard to shoot an expensive arrow as well as a cheap arrow.  And if you have a creative (or crafty) bent, then wood arrows will scratch that itch way better than anything else.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    I live in NC, but not in your neck of the woods.  You might try finding folks through the North Carolina Bowhunters Association.  They have a website: http://www.ncbowhunter.com/

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    Scout,

    All bows will eventually break.  It’s just the nature of the thing.

    As for grain orientation, about the only thing that should be avoided is grain run-off.  If the grain runs down the length of the limb, then all is well.  If the grain runs from side to side, that will lead to failure.

    Self bows are generally made by “following a ring”.  The layers of wood are oriented from back to belly, with the oldest wood on the belly side, and the youngest wood on the back side.  That said, you can make a self bow with “edge grain” meaning the wood is turned so that the layers of wood run side-to-side.  A backing for the edge grain design is recommended.  Edge grain self-bows tend to be less reliable and less accurate.

    Laminated bows are generally made with laminations of wood that are either edge-grain, or flat-grain.  Flat-grain being the orientation that would be used in a self-bow.  Because the laminations are thin and they are generally not put next to a sister lamination from the same tree in the same orientation in which they lay while in the tree, weak spots don’t line up.  This is the strength of a laminated bow.  The laminations of wood, glued together, makes a more homogenous and longer lasting bow.  Add fiberglass to the back and belly and you have a bow of modern design.

    A good bow is “90% broken” when drawn.  This means that the elastic limits of the materials are approached every time the bow is shot.  Getting this close to the limits of the materials is what guarantees a fast and efficient bow, but also guarantees its eventual failure.  A gun stock is never exposed to such high forces and should never fail under normal use.  That said, wood is sneaky.  There is always the chance that some past ice storm or beetle left its unseen affects in the wood and the stock will fail.  Or that the gun maker ran low on coffee one cold morning and didn’t notice how the grain was wandering as he made the stock.

    Speaking of coffee…

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: Numb fingers #135931

    Sounds to me like your glove or tab is not providing enough protection for your fingers.  Numbness is a common symptom for beat-up fingers.

    Get a thicker one 🙂

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    Well said Richard!

    I would add that for a reader, traditional archery offers a LOT more meaningful reading than compound archery.  Get yourself a copy of TJ’s book, and then start reading Don Thomas’s books.  Branch out from there and you will never run out of good stuff.

    Truly embracing traditional archery will change who you are, for the better I might add.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    Something that hasn’t been mentioned yet is arrow speed.  In my experience, if you want to kill a white tail deer, you need to cover the distance between you and it in a timely manner.  Our southern white tails are pretty spooky critters, and I have found that arrow speeds of less than 160 fps (not really all that fast) for 20 yard (and under) shots yields a higher probability of success.

    Shooting arrow weights on the order of 11, 12, 13, or more GPP can result in arrow speeds of less than 150 fps.

    The next time you kill a deer (or find one on the side of the road), hold one of your broadhead arrows in your hand and press it slowly through the chest of a deer.  You will be surprised at how very little effort it takes.

    Some of us, myself included, have little energy to spare (literally and figuratively).  I stand 6 foot 2 inches, but my draw length is just 26.5 inches as I shoot a swing draw style.  My straight limbed american semi-longbow pulling 52 pounds at my draw length can’t shoot a 13 gpp arrow all that fast.  But it zips the 9.5 gpp arrows I shoot at about 165 fps.  Plenty to stick my bloody wood arrows 4 or 5 inches in the dirt on the other side of the deer.

    What about a bone hit? you ask…  My wood arrows and single bevel heads have no problem with our little southern deer bones.  If we plan for the worst, and design our system around the worst, sometimes it no longer works well for the every day.

    Here’s a good test for your deer arrows: Go squirrel hunting with them.  If the squirrels constantly beat y0ur arrows by being somewhere else when your arrow gets there, then the deer will to.  Can’t kill ’em if you can’t hit ’em.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275

    Well my boy shot a deer last night (gun) and gut it, dragged it out, and skinned it.  It’s hanging in the cooler now.  All I had to do was hoist my beverage in salut!  Definitely not a calorie burning operation for me.

     

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: Arm Slap #135205

    Could be a matter of brace height.    Y9u can’t really get away from using an arm guard with bows that sport lower brace heights.  Howard Hill shot straight limbed longbows and said that if the string wasn’t slapping your wrist, the brace height was too high.

  • Stephen Graf
    Member
    Post count: 2275
    in reply to: Arrow set up #135158

    I think Alaska Frontier Archery is Jack Harrison’s old company that tried to get the forgewood shafts going again.  Jack has since retired and that website is being used to clear old inventory.  I don’t think anyone is making the shafts anymore.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,180 total)