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  • trl242
    Post count: 28

    gobbler716 wrote: Yes, check with what the above writer linked to 3Rivers sights.

    3 rivers has a propietery sight that the call their instinctive sight. It has to also be purchased with one of their mounts, either screw on or stick on, though I would use caution with the stick on. The screw on would of course require tapping the riser. The concept of the sight is that you look through it at the target but only focusing on the target, not the sight picture. In this way, they theorize, you learn to shoot instinctively and one day remove the sight.

    Speaking only for myself and the once or twice I’ve shot with a sight, if my form is bad I miss, sight or no sight. It won’t solve the problem of misses and could potentially frustrate you more so than just working on your form. I estimate that 8 out of every 10 poor shots I make have nothing to do with aiming.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: My First Recurve #39633

    Could be any number of things. Make sure you concentrate more on using proper back tension as opposed to where the arrows go. I can only describe how I shoot, or try to, to give you an example. As I draw the bow using my back muscles and I get to full draw, I have a different amount of tension in each muscle due to the different position of each arm. One hand is at my face and the bow hand is in front of me. This gives me the feeling that there is more tension in my drawing muscle (whether that’s the case or not). When I release the arrow, I simply make myself aware of this right hand back tension and the string slips from my fingers. If I, instead, make myself aware of the tension in both muscles at release time, my bow arm tends to flail left and sends my arrow left. Thinking only about my right shoulder tension allows me to keep my bow hand steady and my release much more consistent.

    Ultimately, you will have to experiment and find what works best for you. The best advice I ever received was while watching a Larry Yien video where he talks about finding a second anchor point, the one in your back. Recurves are net very forgiving as opposed to longbows though and usually when you’ve eliminated everything else it all comes back to form.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: Cheap targets #43802

    The cheapest target for me are small game tips. I use three of them in the yard, on an old basketball that I kick around the yard.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: hunting seats #43800

    I’ve used several over the years. I now prefer the ones with a back rest but then you have to spin in the seat to shoot. Recently I bought a simple “Tree Seat” that straps around a tree and you use the tree for a back rest. I like it because you can set it up high like a bar stool, then with minimal movement be standing up in front of it. It also means you have automatic cover behind you as you move (the tree it’s attached to). It’s lightweight and cheap and easy to sling over your back as you ‘hop’ from tree to tree. The downside of this type of seat of course is you need a tree. whichever you choose make sure you are comfortable. It’s all pointless if you can’t sit still in it, one of the reasons I stay away from a folding, backless seat unless I’m in a pop-up blind.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    David Petersen wrote: For the answer to why some folks can consistently shoot well in practice, yet consistently miss when hunting, we need look no farther than to the sister thread “I got the shakes.” Of course it’s not necessary to actually be shaking. Rather, we “get shaken” and lose our composure and concentration. I personally believe the most common reason for this form of buck fever is fear, either conscious or subconscious, that if we don’t shoot “right now” the animal will disappear and we’ll have missed the opportunity and we won’t see any more game and hate ourselves forever for being “over cautious.” I know that’s been my problem when I’ve done a post-mortem on my own hunting misses. And it’s a tough one to overcome because sometimes it’s true that it will be your only chance that day. Bottom line is that it’s loss of concentration and form due to extreme pressure, most or all of which we put on ourselves, leading to rushed shots. I agree with suggestions above to practice on blank targets, picking a different spot each time. And I believe in doing all we can to run through a last-moment mental checklist of the basics before releasing: full draw, solid anchor, pick a spot, follow through. The other primary reason for missing is taking shots too far. No comment.In any event I’ll leave it to you guys to find cures for all the trad bowhunting world’s problems while I’m away for a week — gone whitetail hunting!

    Exactly. The only way I make a good shot is if I tell myself I don’t really care if I hit the deer or not and in fact, may not even shoot this one. I tell myself I’m just practicing drawing on one and once I get to full draw then I think, “Oh, why not release the arrow?”. If I start thinking about how badly I want it, will it walk away in a minute, will there be more behind it, I miss every time. I think the key is to find some way to make yourself feel like you are in control. If you draw and the deer runs or if you don’t draw at all and it walks off, you tell yoursef “I wouldn’t have shot that one anyway, it was just going to be a practice draw”.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: I got the shakes! #43781

    I’ve noticed that the more time it takes for the animal to get to shooting range, the more affected I am. It’s almost as if I have too much time to think about it. When they come up on me suddenly, I know it’s time to go to work and I perform much better. It seems to hit me the more so at the beginning of the season than later, as if it takes me a few ‘deer’ exposures to get over it. The truly odd thing in my case, is I don’t get it at all from a pop-up blind, I think maybe because I’m so confident that the deer can’t see me but the more exposed I am, the harder it is to stay calm.

    Oh well, thanks for the post, glad it’s not just me.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    MCuiksa wrote: That non-event took some lives and did some damage far greater than causing someone to have to move a stand and track a little harder.

    If it were me, I’d go run a chainsaw for a couple days because he’s a neighbor who needs help and to thank him for allowing me to hunt in the past…..

    Just my thoughts. Mike.

    I don’t mean to suggest your post was meant in a disrespectful way….the “non-event” term just seemed a little cold-hearted to those who lost loved ones and your idea of suffering from the hurricane means your hunting area was affected.

    I guess we live in a hyper-sensitive world these days where anyone can find offense at any statement made. Thanks for reminding me of that.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    pothunter wrote: I’ve been watching the news reports some areas look bad, I hope the folks effected get the help they need to rebuild.

    Would your neighbour allow you to harvest the fallen timber and share any profit, might be a way to get the ground clear and create a better habitat.

    No, he uses the wood himself for heat and will most likely cut it a little at a time as he needs it. It’s a nice thought though.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    The 12th. Of Sept. Like everyone else, it seems hard to believe and yet at the same time, it seems like it has taken forever.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: Broadhead Targets #38106

    In my life I have pis..ed away more money on targets than I care to recall. I shoot alot as I’m sure everyone does that’s reading this, and I’ve gone through home made targets and manufactured ones. Second to none, in my small mind, is the Cube that you can get from ArcheryTarget.com. I’m on my second one in two years and I shoot nearly every day. It will take broadheads and field points and in fact I used the remainders of my old one to stuff two target bags with in order to reincarnate one target into two. One is at the camp and the other I use for tree shots. They are not cheap but when you factor in the frustration and add up all the money I’ve spent in the course of just one year on inferior targets, they are well worth the money.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    Good story, thanks for sharing. Too many times we fail to give great customer service it’s due mention and only focus on the ‘horror’ stories.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: FastFlight Strings #29789

    I appreciate all the input. The idea and suggestions are all valid. I have simply given up on the fast flights and went back to dacron, though I like the idea of using the FF material so that I don’t have to change strings as often. Maybe one of these days when I get time, I’ll make a few thicker ones and try those. It was something that I needed to work out quickly though as the big day is growing near and I find myself with less and less ‘experimental’ time to play with. So maybe it will be this winter’s cold-weather experiment after the season ends. At any rate, it’s nice to know that I’m not the only one who had this problem.

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: Stalk in these? #29774

    I have a pair made by Merril. They look like regular athletic shoes but are the same design as the 5 fingers, for barefoot running. I think either pair would be great for hunting. I used to have a pair of Merril’s that looked like mocs but had a soft rubber sole on them and they were fantastic. I suppose it depends on your area you are hunting in, but IMHO you are certainly on the right track with your thinking (outside the box) and you just have to find something that works for you. I always remember what Fred Aspbell said in his book, “who told us that we are supposed to be 100% comfortable when we are in the woods hunting?” or something to that effect.

    As for the running part of this shoe, the idea is that since many of the native peoples of the world, who do not wear shoes but run all the time, do not have the knee and other joint injuries that we do here in America the problem must be our shoes. In fact the theory goes, something along the lines of, the shoes themselves are the real problem – encouraging and trying to compensate for bad running form (heel to toe). The barefoot shoes force you to run on your toes the way it is believes the human body was meant to run and therefore avoids all of the injuries associated with running. I’ve tried them and they certainly do make you run on your toes, though you may not like the way your leg muscles feel the next day.

    The advantage of this technology for us might be the best stalking shoes in the world. Keep us all posted and let us know how it works for you if you decide to try them. Good luck!

    trl242
    Post count: 28
    in reply to: Mid Summer Feeling #23308

    The commercialism doesn’t bother me much and I don’t really care what people choose to hunt with.

    I shoot a re-curve so I must be using a purer form of archery than the guy hunting with a compound. The compound shooter hates the guy who uses the crossbow and the guy using the self-bow hates me, while the guy who made his self-bow string out of the inner-bark of a willow tree hates him. The guy who ground his self-bow out with a sharp rock and sandstone hates everybody. There’s no end to it.

    As far as the commercialization of archery and all the products, IMHO it breeds competition and capitalism which means better products for us all. When I read about the animosity between some archery hunters it always reminds me of the advent of Windows in the 90’s. The old programmers hated Gates and Microsoft for “dummying” down their profession so that even a house wife could send and recieve email with a click of a button and they too considered themselves to be “purists”. None of them, however, complain when they pick up a new laptop for $250.00 and start streaming youtube videos on it.

    For me, the setting out of hunting equipment in stores is the reminder of the upcoming season and it excites me to know that all across the country, my fellow hunters are doing the same thing I am; looking at products and dreaming of the hunts soon coming. At Christmas time many people get into the “spirit” by looking at lights in the park or seeing the displays in shop windows. I’m not a big gadget guy and do not buy alot of things that I don’t think I really need but just being in that environment, surrounded by the products, it is very much like seeing the toys and lights in the shop windows.

    Happy Hunting everyone.

    trl242
    Post count: 28

    I would break up the solid color some as well. Be careful using spray paint though as the smell it leaves behind can sometimes be pretty significant. Maybe a dye of some kind or simply sewing in some scrap rags as “patches” would break it up. I too have hunted with everything from one end of the spectrum to the other. My current outfits are whatever shirt I want to wear, covered with a camo-trukey vest (I like all the pockets) and a pair of dark brown cargo pants form Duluth Trading Co. My biggest issue in this set up seems to be staying far enough away from the deer so I can draw my bow, not that of getting close enough. The old timers wore plaid shirts and solid colored trousers, so I think as long as you’re thinking along the lines of breaking up your outline, you’d be in good shape.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)