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  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #35173

    Ha, yeah I failed to mention that a “couple seconds” is twice as long as I normally hold at anchor anyway. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    We were getting lots of snow till Feb. and then the jet stream shifted and we’ve had had little precip and unusually warm temps ever since. Still, I heard that we are close to 100% of average for snowpack in the Tetons right now, so that’s a good thing. Odd winter all around, for sure.

    So what bow ya shootin’ these days?

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #34671

    Thanks, gang. Good to see this place is still kickin’!

    Pulled out a few different bows tonight, and was able to reach full draw on all of them, if only for a couple seconds, but that’s progress!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #12421

    Greetings, friends old and new –

    What I’ve “got goin” of late is recovering from two trashed shoulders, a dislocated collarbone and a broken wrist, among other things. Just as I was heading into the fall hunting season last year, I took a test flight over the handlebars of my mtn. bike and, as a friend of mine is fond of saying, “my enthusiasm exceeded my talent.” ๐Ÿ˜†

    A forced break from hunting and being overly obsessed with bows was probably healthy for a little while. I tried a few times over the winter to draw my lightest bow, and searing pain would kick in long before I could reach my anchor point. But I believe that being selectively stubborn can occasionally be a good thing in this life, and I refused to accept that I would never shoot a bow again. I also knew that I had to put them away and focus on other things for a while. In the last few days, I’ve been reaching full draw on my longbow, if only a couple times before I need to put it down again, but still. To feel that familiar grip in my hand again, and see and feel the flex of a bow, is a wonderful thing. Heck, maybe I’ll even be able to hunt this year, but if not, I’ll keep stirring the pot and heckling you all on occasion….:wink:

    cheers,

    – Bruce

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    “Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them.”

    – I. Kant

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    John – that’s a very interesting knife. How exactly is the tang mounted into the handle?

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: Ground Game #57276

    Another advantage to natural blinds – you can build several, strategically-placed in a particular area, and move from one to the other as conditions change, without having to undo noisy zippers, velcro, etc.

    And, for a minimal amount of pre-season work, you’ll have a few hundred extra dollars in your pocket.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #55604

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    An old clean t-shirt works just fine. Keep the coats thin, and give it plenty of time to dry. Let’s see ’em when they’re done!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    Thanks for the link, Drew – that was a cool little video.

    It’s interesting to track the shifting opinions of post-contact Europeans, and their N. American descendents, in their attitudes toward Native American skill and equipment in archery. Look for a little more detail on this in an upcoming TBM article. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #51117

    Been pretty busy lately, but I’ve been finding time in the evenings to shoot my bow and ride (trying to keep in shape for elk season, which starts in less than 3 mos!!):

    Came across this fallen nest on a ride yesterday. I don’t recall ever finding a nest before where feathers were such a large part of the materials used in construction. Very cool, and I bet it was warm and cozy!

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    jpc wrote:

    A guy that does not know that some bows are much more efficient than otherโ€ฆ I have not met for 30 years . News are slow to reach some remote corners

    There are also those who cannot acquire the very best and who console themselves ( and others ) by trying to make others believe that it does not exist

    Results of the world championships are unavoidable

    Many bowhunters around the world cannot all be wrong and only one archer in the depths of his country be alone to hold the truth

    I do not make any pub for any bowmaker but I know that a good fly rod does not take more fish than a $ 50 one, but of high quality 10 or 20 times more expensive makes many things impossible with one at a small price

    Since Border introduced the carbon in its hunting bows all bowmakers are trying to copy specially big US brands:):D

    2000 years old citation but still up to date ๐Ÿ˜€

    The ignorant says, The learned doubt, The wise reflects

    A word of advice – it’s all well and good to have different opinions on this, or any other topic, and to express them constructively. But condescencion is completely unecessary. Not to mention, your contributions might be better received. It’s easy – just be nice.

    1145 – an efficient #50 bow, paired with the right arrow (which I personally think is at least, if not more, important) will get the job done on an elk. There are so many excellent options to choose from these days that it’s hard to make a recommendation, but I would suggest looking at a deflex-reflex longbow that will generally have increased speed and efficiency over a straight-limbed longbow, and will usually also have less (if any) felt handshock, which can be tough on folks who already have shoulder problems. There are D/R longbows being made these days that have speeds approaching, if not equal to, recurves. Beyond that, it’s really going to be a matter of finding the bow that “feels” right for you, particularly in terms of grip, which is why it can be so hard to recommend a particular bow. But a good bow maker should be willing to work with you to deliver a bow that fits your hand and your needs.

    A few examples of D/R bows that I have shot and been impressed with:

    Toelke “Whip”

    Big Jim’s “Buffalo Bow”

    Jim Reynold’s “Thunderstick III”

    Martin/Howatt “Savannah”

    The Whip and the Buffalo are my “go to” bows these days, largely due to their speed, smoothness, and for lack of a better word, “pointability.” I hope that is at least somewhat helpful, and please ask more questions if you have them.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: What ya got goin? #35858

    Whoa – hope everything is ok down there, Ralph. That looks like a lot of rain in a place that isn’t used to gettin it.

    Still raining here as well. In fact, we watched one of the most impressive lightning storms I’ve ever seen rage over the mountains behind us last night, including one strike that blew up a tree – you could see the bolt connect with the ridgeline above us and then a huge flash as the tree exploded. Impressive, to say the least. Today is my Sunday, so I’m hoping it will dry out enough that I can get outside for a stump hike today…

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: Noteable Quotes! #33308

    Both are quality quotes, John. Thanks for sharing and welcome to the forum.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514
    in reply to: Possibles bag #32241

    brennanherr wrote: Mike,

    I was looking around and saw this. Looks pretty good to me. http://thehiddenwoodsmen.com/the-haversack/

    Brennan

    I’ve seen those as well. They seem like good quality. I think he makes a smaller version too.

  • Bruce Smithhammer
    Post count: 2514

    Good to see you around again, Steve!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,403 total)