Home Forums Bows and Equipment The Trad Knife Thread

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    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I don’t think we’ve had a good knife thread in a while, and I know that many of us who love trad bows also love good knives, plus it’s winter and I’m bored…so let’s see ’em (in the spirit of keeping it relevant to “traditional equipment,” let’s stick to trad hunting & woodcrafting knives here).

      A few of my faves:

      BRKT Classic Drop Point:

      3.7″ blade

      8.45″ overall

      A-2 steel

      Sheep horn scales w/red liners

      BRKT Mini Fox River (not the best pic, but a great small game knife):

      2.9″ blade

      6.6″ overall

      A-2 steel

      G-10 scales

      A new Nessmuk that I just picked up. It will see lots of use, as soon as I can spend more time outside in a world that isn’t covered in snow:

      4.75″ blade

      9″ overall

      A-2 steel

      Cocobolo scales w/red liners

      Another recent purchase – a Northwoods “Whittler” (I’ve got a soft spot for traditional slip joints, esp. w/Wharncliffe blades). Plus it has an arrowhead on it, so how could I resist?:

      4″ overall

      Red bone scales

      420HC steel

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      Coincidentally I just picked up an Opinel No.7 today for my whittling projects – not quite a trad blade but a lovely little folding knife all the same. I like the high carbon blade that sharpens nicely and is ideal for delicate carving. My hunting knife is just too cumbersome and utilitarian for wood working.

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      My latest, LaClair little shaver:

      Nothing like a good old K-Bar and hawk!

      An old workhourse I refurbished for a friend with a love of osage:

      My grandfathers old western hunting knife and the Bear style kit I made from an old combat boot:

      The buck I use for tillering:

      One a little older I found and refurbished:

      ;

      This one is a WWII knife carried by my great uncle George and saw service in the Pacific on 2 different carriers:

      and this is my current hunting knife. It was homemade (probably from a file) and has been handed down in my family for generations.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Wex – Opinels are certainly “classic” enough of a design to qualify! They’re one of the best little knives you can buy for the price, imo.

      Two4 – there are some great knives, and some real history, in that collection! Thanks for sharing, and I’ve been enjoying your blog.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Here is one of my re-purposed old hickory blades with antler handle and neck sheath

      Wexbow: Love those Opinel folders! My Dad brought one to me from France 10 or so years ago. I recently handed it down to my son for his whittling project along with some other tools for his guitar project.

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      I never thought my little French penknife would generate such nice comments, especially among the high quality and home crafted blades here! I love the antler handles guys – gives such an individual and traditional look to each blade.

    • garydavis
      Post count: 101

      My wife and I carry Opinel No 7’s and I have two No 9’s that I use to trim my goats hooves with. All are carbone blades.

      They hold an edge pretty well and work great as long as I don’t get them too wet, then they become a sheath knife for a while until they dry out.

      Good thread!

    • Alexandre Bugnon
      Member
      Post count: 681

      Helle knife. Gift from David Petersen after my first Elk hunt!

      Damascus knife, beautifully crafted by my good friend Ray Hammond. ( http://www.biggamehuntingblades.com )

      Victorinox, the best! Gift from my parents over 30 years ago

      Argentinian gaucho knife & fork

      2 more in my hunting pack upstate. An Opinel serp and a cool green swiss army knife with locking main blade and a roe deer head carved on it

    • Roger Norris
      Post count: 91

      I got these from the Asbells. Scary sharp, super affordable.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I have the “Western Trade knife” that the Asbells sell. Very surprised by the quality for the price! I’m not sure what the steel is, but it’s a high carbon that takes a wicked edge.

      Those are an interesting design that I haven’t seen before on the Asbell site, Roger – I like the spear point and thicker handle.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      I don’t know how long my ol’daddy had this knife, but a good while I bet.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      WOW.:shock: That is a very sweet old Schrade!

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Thx. I have this Case Arapaho, never been used and the bottom knife was a retirement gift from a friend who’s mentor was Ian van Reenan, I believe originally from S. Africa and lives here in Amarillo now. I use it a bunch. 12 -14 deer anyway.

      Bothered you enough, thanks, Ralph.

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      Sweet! Now I have to go get some pics of my barlows!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Scagel “Bird & Trout:’

      Blade: 3.5″

      Steel: 1095

      Handle: Stacked leather and stag

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Nice!!

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      Bruce that last one is sweet 😯

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Now we’re going from pretty to whatever… This is an old Green River Mtn. Man knife kit that I put together and modified, let’s see, umm, so long ago I think right after the stone age. Not pretty, excuse the sheath, I was making things look rustic on purpose. I think these were made and still are by Russel. This has been the handiest all purpose knife, for animal work, camp work, cooking work and hard to beat for butchering. It fits right in my primitive artistic skills :lol::lol::lol: too. If ever there was a guy who could build stuff for use and not very trade-able…….

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      I like it Ralph, it looks like it could’ve come straight out of 19th century trappers cabin.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A few Bokers:

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      There’s a bit of a story with these two knives. Jeff Jeffcoat made them, he was of the generation of archery before and at the very beginning of compounds. I had been shooting recurves some but the compounds were “shining” but I was growing tired of them and going back to trad. Jeff along with Kelly Gustin and Hubert Moore were the main archery characters in the area at the time. Kelly was in fact a friend of Fred Bear. Me, in my late 20’s was infatuated with these “ol” dudes. Anyway Jeff got into knife making and was very good at it. One I bought the other I traded my next to the last compound to him for the little one.

      He had to try!!! Anyway short story behind my Jeffcoat’s. Last compound was given to a land owner in appreciation of letting me hunt one season.

    • wolfkill220
      Post count: 71

      This is one I made from a old car leaf spring.

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      R2 That knife ROCKS!

      Here is my first knife…..field dressed my first deer with it.

      and then got a few more……

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      My first hunting knife was a buck also. There symbol of cutting a bolt with the knife and a hammer? Well I cut a pelvis with a rock:o. They ask me how I broke the knife. They replaced it with no problem but somebody slipped a handwritten note in the package that said “Don’t believe everything you see.” Lesson learned. I sharpened that knife so much that the point was not protected within the handle anymore when it was closed and became rather unsafe so I retired it. Nice to see these knives.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      This is “Mountain Spirit” that I made many years ago with the wilds of the mountain man on my mind. It has been passed to the next generation. My son sent this pic today and said the knife saved him in a dream last night. Wild!!!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      R2 wrote: My son sent this pic today and said the knife saved him in a dream last night. Wild!!!

      Wow – that’s some juju!

      Sweet looking knife, R2.

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      Beauties everyone!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Great Eastern Cutlery “Hound Tooth:”

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      I use this knife for everything. Dressing deer and flipping pancakes, splitting firewood and carving fire kits. With some practice, big knives can do it all.

      Blade length 5.5″

      Blade width 2″

      Handle length 5″

      O1 steel

    • Stumpkiller
      Member
      Post count: 193

      Here are some of mine I think highly of.

      My neck knife – my Rowan (Esee) Izula in a flat Kydex sheath. I have field dressed several deer with this one and it does it well.

      Third from either end in this image – a Kershaw Knockout. I REALLY like this knife as a general purpose every day carry. It opens one-handed (and fast – spring assisted opening) and the blade is all sorts of handy for most tasks.

      The SAK on the bottom is a Victorinox Camper – I keep this in hip pocket beside my wallet at all times. It has dressed many deer over the years and is all sorts of handy for multiple tasks.

      And my Benchmade Activator 201. D2 steel that took forever to get sharp but has not been resharpened in two deer and many other tasks. This seems to be an ideal belt knife.

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      Are those custom scales on the izula? I really like that knife

    • ChumpMcgee
      Member
      Post count: 252

      I am going to have to come back to this thread more often. I really want to get into collecting knives but do not know how to start minus with my winchester pocket knife. I carry that thing all the time but would like to get a really good hunting knife. Some really nice looking ka-nives here πŸ™‚

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      I already posted my little Opinel knife and figured my hunting knife was a bit boring but hey it’s a good functional knife so it should get some glory! A Swedish Frost Mora army issue, cheap as chips but does exactly what it says on the tin!

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Neal, I have one also. I just had it in my truck for a back up and for a defense weapon. Then last year I grabbed it to field dress a deer and it was great. Used it for the 2nd deer also. It weighs nothing and I carry it in my haversack all the time now. They’re made for work and they do it well. I think I’ll get another to throw in my “go bag”.

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      You pretty much summed it up Ralph. It’s not a looker but it works and if you lose it so what, just get another one – it ain’t no heirloom πŸ˜‰

    • Stumpkiller
      Member
      Post count: 193

      Gigglemonk wrote: Are those custom scales on the izula? I really like that knife

      Semi. BladeHQ offers them. The same rough Mikarta Esse and RAT use on their knives. I really appreciate the added grip. I had it paracord wrapped and after one deer it was a odor trap.

      Not what you want in a neck knife.

      Here’s another one of my favorites. A “Camper” laminated steel blade from Brusletto stuck in a piece of antler with iron pins (finishing nails) and a sheath I made. This has been around the block a few times and remains a great camp knife. About $25 in materials – if that.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Folks,

      I’ve been watching this thread all along. Some beautiful knives here and some great photos of them. Finally, I took a photos of some of my favorites. I’ll probably post them separately to get them all on. The first is my old stainless Boy Scout knife that I’ve carried for many miles and had in my pocket when I made Eagle. I saved up my lawn mowing money to buy this knife. dwcphoto

      attached file
    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      These were made for me by friend Bud Nealy from Damascus steel. The single is a Bud Nealy boot knife he made for me with a kydex sheath. I also have one of these sheaths made to fit a broadhead for safe carry outside of the quiver. dwc

      attached fileattached file
    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      This is my stumping knife,a Buck 110, bought for $15 on the auction due to the broken tip. I filed the tip so it’s handy for digging heads our of stumps.

      attached file
    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      The top one is a Buck 118 that I bought in ’73. I was seduced by that beautiful ad of a Buck cutting through a nail. It’s been a good knife and held an edge all the way through a large buck I butchered this year. The bottom knife is an old Schrade-Walden that belonged to my grandfather. I made the sheath for it in leather shop class in junior high school. dwc

      attached fileattached file
    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      The last one I’ll show is my Dad’s KaBar he carried during WWII, in England, Africa, France, and Germany, and while he ferried troops in his truck during the Battle of the Bulge. Yep, this one’s precious. Thanks for looking, dwcphoto

      attached file
    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Great photos David. I hope you never lose the kabar. What a piece of history.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      ausjim wrote: Great photos David. I hope you never lose the kabar. What a piece of history.

      Agreed. Very cool contributions, David (and everyone else).

      Here is a Queen ‘Straight Jack’ that has been seeing a lot of pocket time lately. It’s a little shorter than I normally prefer in a pocket knife for daily carry – it’s 3-3/8″ and I normally prefer folders between 3.5″ & 4″ but it has a solid heftiness to it that makes it feel like a bigger knife than it is. Queen did a gorgeous job on the bone handles on this series. And their D2 steel takes a fantastic edge.

      Oh, and the Wathen’s isn’t bad either….8)

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Thanks, guys. That KaBar only comes out of the safe for special showings, otherwise it sits on top of my Granddad’s whet stone. I also have a gravity knife, a sailor’s knife I think, that my dad liberated when he was transporting prisoners off the line.

      I love that Queen. I have an older trapper model that I always thought was too long to fit in my pocket comfortable. Case and Queen knives are still made in Pennsylvania.

      That case in my post was yard sale score with blades worn to the nubs. I sent it back to Case and they fitted new blades and cleaned it up like new. I forgot that I didn’t post that photo… I’ll do it here.

      Smithy, don’t you know that booze and sharp tools don’t mix… πŸ˜‰

      dwc

      attached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A Blind Horse ‘Camp Muk’ and a Boker Copperhead. The Muk is a fantastic skinning, food processing, general camp knife. Probably one of the most all-around useful knives I own. O1 carbon steel blade, micarta scales. I’m a sucker for ‘Nessmuk’ designs.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      dwcphoto wrote: Case and Queen knives are still made in Pennsylvania.

      That case in my post was yard sale score with blades worn to the nubs. I sent it back to Case and they fitted new blades and cleaned it up like new.

      I’m glad to hear Case is still providing that level of good service. I have a Case Trapper that shows amazing attention to detail for what the knife actually cost.

      Queen also manufactures knives under several other names, such as Schatt & Morgan and Northwoods. Any of them are excellent choices, imo. With so many things no longer being made domestically, it’s heartening to know that we still have a number of excellent quality knife makers (and bowyers!) that are still surviving and dedicated to producing functional beauty.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      I’m with you. I also have a Case scout knife that I bought at a yard sale years ago for $5. I sent that in and they cleaned it up nice and polished. Short of collecting, these things are so well made that you really don’t need to buy any more. dwc

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      My favorite Trapper (at the moment…8))

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Oh oh, knife topic! One of my favorite things!! Had a BRKT once, can’t remember the model, but I wasn’t impressed at all! The grinds weren’t even on the sides or the distal taper, looked real amateur! Ended basically giving it away for that reason. Lots of folks swear by them! Here are a few of mine.

      Above is a simple Mora with a G11 handle.

      Small pack knife 440C with tiger stripe G10 slabs.

      Slightly bigger knife, 1095 steel with blue G10 slabs.

      Big ole pig sticker, double edged, 01 tool steel, black G10 slabs.

      My go to knife, CPM154, bocote slabs. It’s seen a lot of critters!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote: Had a BRKT once, can’t remember the model, but I wasn’t impressed at all! The grinds weren’t even on the sides or the distal taper, looked real amateur!

      That’s very surprising. How long ago was this knife made? Not doubting your experience at all, but every BRKT I own has had excellent f&f and perfect convex grinds. In addition, their customer service is top-notch, so if you received a knife from them that wasn’t satisfactory, I have no doubt they would have made it right.

      Regardless, I’m curious about some of those other blades, like the wood handle/mosaic pin & the 1095 w/blue G10. Who is the maker?

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      DWC – nice Scout knife! That’s a classic.

      Another fave of mine – a Blind Horse Knives ‘Lost Trail:’

      Great ergonomics and a really useful, versatile spear point. Green micarta and O1 steel.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: [quote=sinawalli]Had a BRKT once, can’t remember the model, but I wasn’t impressed at all! The grinds weren’t even on the sides or the distal taper, looked real amateur!

      That’s very surprising. How long ago was this knife made? Not doubting your experience at all, but every BRKT I own has had excellent f&f and perfect convex grinds. In addition, their customer service is top-notch, so if you received a knife from them that wasn’t satisfactory, I have no doubt they would have made it right.

      Regardless, I’m curious about some of those other blades, like the wood handle/mosaic pin & the 1095 w/blue G10. Who is the maker?

      The BRKT was purchased second hand off another forum, so I’m not sure how old it was. Yeah I’m pretty sure it was a anomaly. I’m not sure how noticeable it was, but being a knifemaker you notice/look for that type of thing, especially in a high end knife. They have a good rep, and I would probably buy another one should the deal present itself! All the knives pictured were made by me. The Mora was just the blade, and I made the handle.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: DWC – nice Scout knife! That’s a classic.

      Another fave of mine – a Blind Horse Knives ‘Lost Trail:’

      Great ergonomics and a really useful, versatile spear point. Green micarta and O1 steel.

      That sir is a nice knife!! Love the simple design!

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Here is a Arkansas Toothpick I made for a good friend as a retirement gift for serving 35 years in the military.

    • Charles EkCharles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      From left, Roselli Hunter (old style, which I prefer), Helle Fjellkniv, KJ Eriksson/Mora 746-G and Brusletto Speiderkniv (again, old style):

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote: All the knives pictured were made by me. The Mora was just the blade, and I made the handle.

      That’s what I suspected. Nice work!!

      And I like the looks of that Roselli. Interesting design.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Prepping the essential ingredient in my wife’s ‘elk bourguignon:’

    • skinner biscuitskinner biscuit
      Member
      Post count: 250

      Uncle Henry golden spike,Remington big game folder,uncle henry trapper. Spetnatz survival matchete, for making trails through the rain forest jungle.

      attached file
    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Skinner, my first thought when I saw that machete was ‘that is the Mi-24 Hind of the knife world. Looks like it can do anything but ugly as sin’.

      I was amused when you said it is a spetznatz survival tool. Ugly utilitarianism is a trademark of communist russia eh?

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      I finally got a hold of a repro Bowhunter’s kit sheath!:D

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Love this thread. If I didn’t already own enough knives for forty lifetimes I’d have to go shopping. I suspect most of you are in the same boat.

      What all is in that bowhunter’s kit? dwc

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      It comes with a knife, file, Norton stone, and P38 can opener.

      I carry:

      My old file (partial to the larger wood handle)

      Glue stick

      Diamond hone

      Pencil for completing license

      Hunting License

      Zip ties for tags & field dressing

      Extra eclipse with bear bleeders

      Knife

      And P38 can opener (kept it in there but may put something else in that pocket?)

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Two4hooking –

      Way cool –did you make or purchase your bowhunters knife&tool Kit?

      Scout

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      cyberscout wrote: Two4hooking –

      Way cool –did you make or purchase your bowhunters knife&tool Kit?

      Scout

      I purchased it. There are a few online stores that sell them currently.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Two4hooking–

      Thanks – I’ll check it out

      Scout

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514
    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Bill — that “Sticker” is gorgeous work! What sort of leather is the sheath and how did you get it to look so old? Your freind is a lucky man to have a friend as talented and generous as you. Despite a 7th-grade metal-working class back in the late 1800s (it seems), knife-making is a skill I’ll never acquire, so I’m all the more impressed by those who do it and do it well.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      David Petersen wrote: Bill — that “Sticker” is gorgeous work! What sort of leather is the sheath and how did you get it to look so old? Your freind is a lucky man to have a friend as talented and generous as you. Despite a 7th-grade metal-working class back in the late 1800s (it seems), knife-making is a skill I’ll never acquire, so I’m all the more impressed by those who do it and do it well.

      Thanks Dave! All I can take credit for is the knife! I farmed out the sheath to a buisness acquaintance I dealt with in the past who is a amazing leather worker/knife maker. I found a pic of a sheath I wanted, changed a few things, added the Ranger star (my friend is US Army Ranger tabbed), added a genuine bear claw, and presto, he came up with this brilliant design! The leather is rawhide that is “aged” to appear old. The knife was one of the most intensive projects I’ve undertaken! Made the first one, got it all done, looked at it for awhile and said *#ck it! Not what I wanted, so I totally scrapped it. Built another one, didn’t like the handle scales, ground them off, six months later, came up with what you see now! Gave it to him along with a fine bottle of whiskey the day before he officially retired! My sheaths are kydex, don’t have the means or talent for leather!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      The Nessmuk got pressed into kitchen duty the other day, for a fresh batch of jerky. For a knife with such a beefy spine, I’m always amazed at how well it does on fine slicing tasks. Just a wonderful, all-around design:

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A recent acquisition – the BR ‘Trail Buddy.’ An updated, slightly-streamlined version of the classic Marble’s ‘Woodcraft’ knife:

      Another time-tested, very versatile design that I can already tell will be seeing a lot of belt time this season.

    • bruc
      Member
      Post count: 476

      I scrolled through all three pages and some very beautiful, functional knives !!

      The one that I have, that I feel is one of the most functional hunting knives is the “Leatherman Wave” Sorry I didn’t take a picture, but it will do just about everything .

      Bruce

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      This guy makes knives out of everything from wrenches to rebar to railroad spikes. Thought it was worth sharing.

      Logan Pearce knives

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Ben (Prairie Prowler) wrote: This guy makes knives out of everything from wrenches to rebar to railroad spikes. Thought it was worth sharing.

      Logan Pearce knives

      Ben! Do you own one of those knives? Checked out website, and they certainly are priced right! $75 for a handmade knife is cheap! Wonder if they are any good?

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      No, I don’t own one and I’ve never met the guy, but his work seems reputable. Quite a few folks on the internet have positive things to say about his knives. I own a couple knives–use my pocket knife every day–and I recognize their beauty and function, but I just don’t have that “collector’s” gene. I do enjoy this thread though, and I think the knives you all own are pretty cool.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Can’t hunt right now, but there’s other ways to get dinner…

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      Here’s a caping knife I made from a very old straight razor …

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Here’s a few more!

      Made the one on the left for a friend, the other one was a left over piece of 440C.

      This one was for a guy I grew up with and lived across the street from us.

      This one is a backup I carry with me. Small and concealable!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A fun little project this afternoon:

      Almost 10 years ago while living/traveling in South America, I bought a gaucho knife from a knife maker in a little outdoor market in El Bolson, Argentina. All that the maker could tell me was that the blade was made from an old leaf spring, and that the handle was made from Γ±irre, a hardy South American beech common in Patagonia. I continued to use the knife for the rest of the trip, but since then, it has pretty much languished in a drawer.

      Not sure why, but today that knife popped into my head and I decided to dig it out. The leather was dry and neglected, so the first thing I did was give it a couple treatments of Montana Pitch. Then it was time to bring the edge back to life, which took a fair bit of effort, given it never had the most even grind to begin with (but being old, high carbon steel, it will take and hold a wicked edge quite nicely). And then I rubbed a little linseed oil into the handle, and an old traveling friend had returned.

      Length overall – 8-1/4″

      Blade length – 4-3/4″

      For those unfamiliar with these knives, this is the one knife that a gaucho would have on his person and use 24/7, stuck into his belt, for just about everything from cutting rope to splitting kindling to his “meat knife” at the day’s end ‘asado’ or BBQ. My example would be on the smaller end of what is often carried:

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Two beauties. I love the first one, though. Nice. dwc

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: A fun little project this afternoon:

      Almost 10 years ago while living/traveling in South America, I bought a gaucho knife from a knife maker in a little outdoor market in El Bolson, Argentina. All that the maker could tell me was that the blade was made from an old leaf spring, and that the handle was made from Γ±irre, a hardy South American beech common in Patagonia. I continued to use the knife for the rest of the trip, but since then, it has pretty much languished in a drawer.

      Not sure why, but today that knife popped into my head and I decided to dig it out. The leather was dry and neglected, so the first thing I did was give it a couple treatments of Montana Pitch. Then it was time to bring the edge back to life, which took a fair bit of effort, given it never had the most even grind to begin with (but being old, high carbon steel, it will take and hold a wicked edge quite nicely). And then I rubbed a little linseed oil into the handle, and an old traveling friend had returned.

      Length overall – 8-1/4″

      Blade length – 4-3/4″

      For those unfamiliar with these knives, this is the one knife that a gaucho would have on his person and use 24/7, stuck into his belt, for just about everything from cutting rope to splitting kindling to his “meat knife” at the day’s end ‘asado’ or BBQ. My example would be on the smaller end of what is often carried:

      Pretty sweet! The top one lokks like a Searles Bowies!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Guess it’s time I chime in. While I can’t compete with those of you who are obviously collectors, a guy does acquire a lot of tools over a lifetime and here are my primary hunters, starting at noon and circling clockwise:

      Shrade Sharpfinger with elk antler handle from my first elk, 1981. It’s the oldest and I rank it #3 as an all-round field dressing and hunting/camping blade. The sheath was made for me by a Zuni Pueblo Indian with mountain lion claw.

      Helle Fire — this is my “thousand dollar knife” (got it with a life membership to BHA). It ranks #1, easily best hunting knife I’ve ever owned.

      Shrade Sharpfinger with original handle. #3. I haven’t used it in years but took apart several elk with it years ago. Don’t know why I still have it.

      Armguard backup knife, Farr West Leathers. Not yet field tested.

      Helle blade with deer antler handle. Backup, not yet field tested.

      Alaskan native made with leaf spring steel from WWII Jeep and fossilized extinct sea cow rib handle. #2 favorite.

      Helle blade with Osage orange handle. Backup, used to field dress a bull elk when I forgot to bring my Helle. Worked great but my hand was sore for days from the small handle.

      Swiss Army knife. Not pictured. Always with me, whether hunting or dining out or giving a public talk. (I do take if off when I shower.) Used once to take a whitetail apart when I forgot my Helle. Worked just OK but easily the best knife I own for opening wine and beer bottles.

      attached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Dave – those old Sharpfingers (when they were still made in the US and w/carbon steel) are one of my all time favorites. I’m a sucker for trailing point knives in general, and those classic Sharpfingers hit all the right notes. Nice little collection, for not being a collector! πŸ˜‰

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      I’ve been working on some selfbows lately and have been deeply disappointed by the quality of my modern drawknife. The steel just won’t hold an edge; osage eats right through it. An experienced friend suggested I check antique stores for old high-carbon tools and that’s what I did. Picked up this pair of Keen Kutters, an 8″ and a 6″. They were both somewhat sharp but I put a proper edge on them. The 8″ had a few notches in the blade which I worked out very carefully with the bench grinder (my grandfather would have thrown a fit if he’d seen me do that). I’m proud of these knives. They hold an edge and do the work I expect of them.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Very cool, Ben. Those KK’s are a good score! Looking forward to seeing what you produce with them.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Well, this thread sure has worked out great for me, so thanks for starting it, Bruce. After admiring a knife made by Sinawalli (Bill Brushey, among our most active Canuck brothers) we started a pm correspondence that led to working out a barter that netted me the gorgeous new knife below. While it’s fairly easy to get a truly custom bow built according to our specs, not so common with knives. In this case Bill and I talked back and forth about various options and here’s the result … not just gorgeous but highly functional in that it meets all my demands for a first-line elk skinner, including quality steel, drop-point blade with thick back edge (for prying heavy bone joints apart, etc.), a substantial wood handle about the size of the blade (for max leverage) and a finger groove at the bottom back of the blade. It’s my first truly custom knife and I could not be more pleased both with the design and functionality, as well as the artful workmanship. My old trusty Helle, still my vote for the best commercial knife made (certainly not the prettiest) alas, is now semi-retired as “first backup” blade relegated to the bottom of the hunting pack. Thanks, Bill. I think I skinned you on this deal! πŸ˜› And somewhere out there right this minute, there’s an elk that’s destined to be skint with the Brushey Blade in Sept.! Happy camper, here.

      attached fileattached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Very nice, Dave! And fine work, Bill! That looks like a very practical design.

      The mosaic pins are a nice touch, and is that cocobolo on the handle? I’ve got a pretty good idea of size from the ‘in hand’ pic, but can you share the specs, Dave? And steel?

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: Very nice, Dave! And fine work, Bill! That looks like a very practical design.

      The mosaic pins are a nice touch, and is that cocobolo on the handle? I’ve got a pretty good idea of size from the ‘in hand’ pic, but can you share the specs, Dave? And steel?

      Good eye! Yes it’s cocobolo, steel is CPM 154.

      Thanks Dave for the kind words, it was a pleasure making it, I hope it serves you well!!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Bruce, here are the specs. Darned if I didn’t get the knife and ruler unaligned (no wonder I flunked out of engineering school even before I enrolled). Overall it’s 8″ long. The handle is nice and fat, the way I like it.

      attached file
    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Dave,

      That is a nice one. How about a pic or dimension of the spine of that blade.

      Duncan

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Here’s a few of mine

      Out of the sheaths. The ceramic insulator on the dowel serves as a sharpener similar to a crock stick

      An Uncle Henry…

      A few more. The Browning my boys gave me when I was Supervisor of Operations of a NG Distribution Company. The sharpfinger was my first real deer huntin’ knife. Picked up the uncle henry in a junk shop in VA.

      Some favorite folders. one of them was always in my pocket when in the woods or just outdoors. The Buck Lite more so than the others, it was a gift from the wife. Folk lore says knives are bad luck if given to a spouse. Must be nothing to it. I’ve had her for 30 years and the knife for 25. Skint my speed goat with the one in the middle.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Duncan wrote: Here’s a few of mine

      Out of the sheaths. The ceramic insulator on the dowel serves as a sharpener similar to a crock stick

      An Uncle Henry…

      A few more. The Browning my boys gave me when I was Supervisor of Operations of a NG Distribution Company. The sharpfinger was my first real deer huntin’ knife. Picked up the uncle henry in a junk shop in VA.

      Some favorite folders. one of them was always in my pocket when in the woods or just outdoors. The Buck Lite more so than the others, it was a gift from the wife. Folk lore says knives are bad luck if given to a spouse. Must be nothing to it. I’ve had her for 30 years and the knife for 25. Skint my speed goat with the one in the middle.

      Nice! What are the ones in the first (top) pic? They look handmade! Ceramic insulator in a dowel= genius!! Good thinking!! Love that idea!!

    • plentycoupe
      Member
      Post count: 4

      Hey all,

      Im looking for someone to make a sheath for me. I won a RMEF banquet knife during the auction this year.

      I would like to carry it while hunting this year but have no sheath. Would like to have a nice one made.

      Thanks for any recommendations

      Jason

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Jason –

      You might want to contact these guys. I have a few of their sheaths, and they are well made. They can do a lot more than what is currently on their website, but it will give you an idea:

      http://greatlakesleatherworks.com/index.html

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Sinawalli,

      I made those knives in the top pics but I did not make the blades. They are from a couple of Old Hickory knives I had around that used to be used in the garden to cut stuff. Thats why they have some pitting in them. I like to re-purpose unused things into useful items. I cannot lay claim to the ceramic insulator idea though. My old bear hunting buddy who happened to be a telephone company employee gave me the idea when I saw one he had made at bear camp.

      Duncan

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Just an old steak knife that I was using to slice a hunk of cheese this morning. Glad my parts were where my parts oughta been. Just a reminder when we’re using any of these sharp πŸ˜€ knives I’ve seen here, always be careful??

    • plentycoupe
      Member
      Post count: 4

      Smithhammer wrote: Jason –

      You might want to contact these guys. I have a few of their sheaths, and they are well made. They can do a lot more than what is currently on their website, but it will give you an idea:

      http://greatlakesleatherworks.com/index.html

      Thanks for the link.

      I called today and placed and order. Am looking forward to getting home and sending the knife. Should be back before I head out on my elk hunt.

      Jason

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Glad to hear that worked out. Post a few pics when it arrives!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Just a little classic Sunday reading, and my favorite Barlow:

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Here’s one of a range of knives made by pretty talented young man down here. The pup is still in his teens I think and producing this:

      It’s going in my wife’s suggestion box for my christmas gift this year πŸ˜‰

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Great looking knife, and that looks like some really nice leatherwork on the sheath as well. Particularly impressive if the knifemaker is still in his teens!! I think I might have seen some examples of his work before on a knife forum I hang out on.

      But is it just the light, or does that jimping on the spine look like it would eat your thumb for breakfast?

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      One for me too Jim ol’ buddy, buddy, mate:D:D:D:D.

      That is a good looking knife!

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Smithhammer wrote: But is it just the light, or does that jimping on the spine look like it would eat your thumb for breakfast?

      Just the light I think, here’s another angle:

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      R2 wrote: One for me too Jim ol’ buddy, buddy, mate:D:D:D:D.

      Ralph, I’ll put in a good word but I don’t think you’re on my wife’s Christmas list πŸ˜‰

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Jim. Yep, the way it is:D. With all the grandsons I can’t even get on my own list!:wink:

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Here’s my version of a Helle Fire in 01 tool steel, RC 62, with blaze orange G10 scales, so you can find it when you put it down!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Wow! Five pages–you done went and started a great thread, Bruce!

      By way of an update, I just received a custom sheath made by Duncan to complement the custom knife made by Sinawalli/Bill. Nothing fancy, as I prefer it, but lovely in its simple functionality. Now my hunting outfit is complete! And thanks to the personal nature of most every piece of it this year, it has some serious mojo.

      attached fileattached fileattached file
    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      That’s sharp! Pun intended.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Nice work, Duncan and Bill! I tend to prefer clean and simple pouch sheaths as well.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: Nice work, Duncan and Bill! I tend to prefer clean and simple pouch sheaths as well.

      Wow that’s nice! Dave, love the simple design! Looks great!

      Smith hammer, how about a few more pics of that knife? Looks very interesting!!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote:

      Smithhammer, how about a few more pics of that knife? Looks very interesting!!

      Here ya go:

      7″ overall

      3.2″ blade

      CPM3V steel

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: [quote=sinawalli]

      Smithhammer, how about a few more pics of that knife? Looks very interesting!!

      Here ya go:

      7″ overall

      3.2″ blade

      CPM3V steel

      Wow! Slabs are antler? Is the blade gun blued or just a real dark patina? How do you like the CPM3V? I hear its real tough stuff!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote:

      Wow! Slabs are antler? Is the blade gun blued or just a real dark patina? How do you like the CPM3V? I hear its real tough stuff!

      Yup – antler scales. And it has some patina going on, but its also just partially the lighting in the pic. As you probably know, 3V, while not a true stainless steel, is still a lot more stain resistant than something like A2 or 1095. And it’s fantastic at holding an edge, while not being brittle and still having a reasonable toughness of 58-60 Rockwell. I’m a big fan of A2 (and O1), but I have several 3V knives, and it is really impressive!

    • jason samkowiak
      Post count: 141

      a tried, true, used and abused esee 4 that is with me all the time in the woods.

      <img src="[IMG]http://i247.photobucket.com/albums/gg133/jasonsamko/uploadknife_zpse1ccdc41.jpg” alt=”” />[/img]

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A real handy little trapper I picked up recently:

      Bone scales

      D2 steel

      5-3/4″ overall

    • plentycoupe
      Member
      Post count: 4

      I bought this one at the Red River chapter RMEF auction this spring.

      I recently received the sheath. After receiving a post on here earlier to contact Gregg at Great Lakes Leather Works I did and he came up with this for me.

      Tonight I will have them with me as I take a 13 year old out on his first hunt ever. Whitetail doe here in ND!

      attached fileattached file
    • plentycoupe
      Member
      Post count: 4

      Not sure what happened to the pics but after resizing they sure come out fuzzy.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      plentycoupe wrote: I bought this one at the Red River chapter RMEF auction this spring.

      I recently received the sheath. After receiving a post on here earlier to contact Gregg at Great Lakes Leather Works I did and he came up with this for me.

      Tonight I will have them with me as I take a 13 year old out on his first hunt ever. Whitetail doe here in ND!

      How about some specs on that knife! Love that style! Very nice!

    • Stumpkiller
      Member
      Post count: 193

      I hopped on this thread early on but it’s still hanging on so I’ll show my latest sharps.

      I have a pair of semi-matched Finnish Puuko knives that have really won my heart over. 1095 Carbon steel of about 60 Rockwell and they just hold the edge forever.

      The larger (8″) I’ve been using as a hatchet replacement for a few years (lops a 1-1/2″ limb in one swipe) when making blinds or as a camp knife, and the smaller (90mm – 3-5/8″) is just the right size for most field dressing and general chores. Light and sharp! It’s on my hip most weekends for the general sheep/chicken/garden hobby farm duties I have hereabouts.

      [image]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/Stumpkiller/Accoutrements/DSCN1069_zps17c8d816.jpg[/image]

    • Anonymous
      Post count: 124

      I don’t know if I’ve ever seen all my knives in a single pile. I might just have to remedy that.

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      A cool knife just sort of fell in my lap this week. My father in-law was cleaning out his woodshop and sent me home with a box of “treasures”. (Code for my clutter becomes your clutter because I know you are too polite to tell me no.)

      The knife is a Collins Co. Legitimus #18. It appears to be a WWII fighting/survival knife, though I haven’t been able to verify its age yet. The poor thing was abused, then neglected for a long time. I soaked it in vinegar for a day to loosen the rust and only then found the manufacturer’s stamp. A little more work and it’ll have a proper edge once again.

    • Anonymous
      Post count: 124

      That’s a rare, collectible, well-over-couple-hundred-dollars-worth piece of “clutter” right there!

      Wow!

      Ben M. wrote: A cool knife just sort of fell in my lap this week. My father in-law was cleaning out his woodshop and sent me home with a box of “treasures”. (Code for my clutter becomes your clutter because I know you are too polite to tell me no.)

      The knife is a Collins Co. Legitimus #18. It appears to be a WWII fighting/survival knife, though I haven’t been able to verify its age yet. The poor thing was abused, then neglected for a long time. I soaked it in vinegar for a day to loosen the rust and only then found the manufacturer’s stamp. A little more work and it’ll have a proper edge once again.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Forager wrote: That’s a rare, collectible, well-over-couple-hundred-dollars-worth piece of “clutter” right there!

      Wow!

      [quote=Ben M.]A cool knife just sort of fell in my lap this week. My father in-law was cleaning out his woodshop and sent me home with a box of “treasures”. (Code for my clutter becomes your clutter because I know you are too polite to tell me no.)

      The knife is a Collins Co. Legitimus #18. It appears to be a WWII fighting/survival knife, though I haven’t been able to verify its age yet. The poor thing was abused, then neglected for a long time. I soaked it in vinegar for a day to loosen the rust and only then found the manufacturer’s stamp. A little more work and it’ll have a proper edge once again.

      I would have to agree! Nice find!

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Thing is, I can’t tell if the handle is made of horn or plastic. From what I understand, horn would mark the knife as a definite WWII weapon. Plastic may or may not be from that time. It could have been made in the 1950’s. The other thing is that someone took the blade to a disc sander and really did a number on it. Instead of having the factory convex edge, it’s a really uneven pseudo-hollow grind. Kind of like a damaged lawnmower blade. So, we’ll see. I doubt the thing has much collector’s value but it is one wicked-lookin’ pig sticker.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I came across this little video recently, and thought it would be a worthy addition to the ‘trad knife’ thread. How to make a folding flint and bone pocket knife. Stick with it – the end result is pretty awesome:

      http://youtu.be/hZUQ1kfZY5k

    • Larry O. Fischer
      Post count: 92

      Here’s my father’s Remington. His brother took it from him and threw it against a tree breaking the handle. I fixed it years ago and he carried it since then and on his last hunt. It has to somewhere around 75 years old.

      attached file
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Larry O. Fischer wrote: Here’s my father’s Remington. His brother took it from him and threw it against a tree breaking the handle. I fixed it years ago and he carried it since then and on his last hunt. It has to somewhere around 75 years old.

      Oh I like that! Any idea what the steel is? Going by the patina, has to be a carbon steel. Very cool!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Nice job on that antler handle, Larry! Looks real comfy.

    • Johnson37
      Post count: 5

      Got this as a gift a few years ago, I have a couple Black Widows and my father thought I would like it. Have any of you ever seen one. I’ve never actually used it just kind of sits around. I have a few CRKT knives I use on a regular bases there great knives.

      attached file
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Johnson37 wrote: Got this as a gift a few years ago, I have a couple Black Widows and my father thought I would like it. Have any of you ever seen one. I’ve never actually used it just kind of sits around. I have a few CRKT knives I use on a regular bases there great knives.

      That is a very cool knife! What steel is it, who is the maker, what is the OAL? Really like that design!

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      I thought this was a cool story and deserved to go in this thread, although I know none of the people involved..

      23 January, 2014 5:17PM ACST

      The story of my knife

      By Emma Sleath (Online Reporter)

      The youthful theft of a hunting knife played on one man’s conscience for over thirty years…so he made a startling confession.

      An old hunting knife has sparked a reunion between old school mates on a Facebook page dedicated to memories of Alice Springs.

      Eugene Blom, who still lives in the Centre, stole the knife over thirty years ago and posted his confession earlier this week.

      This is a G96 knife. It has burned a hole in my conscience from the day I stole it on a school camp in 1978,” he writes.

      It belongs to the nicest bloke you would ever meet…it was a present from his sister.

      The post attracted hundreds of ‘likes’ and comments on the Growing Up in Alice Springs forum which has over 11,000 members.

      One comment was from the original owner of the knife, Peter Haines – now based in Perth.

      Well, bloody hell, I long wondered what happened to that knife,” he writes.

      “…would you believe I still have the original pouch?

      Mr Blom has politely declined to speak to the ABC but gave his permission to use some of the material contained in his posts.

      Meanwhile, there are plans for a reunion, and a beer, between Eugene and Peter later in the year.

      The below is taken from Eugene Blom’s original post in the forum…

      Mate, I have carried this burden and cherished it for you, I have skinned and gutted hundreds of rabbits, and taken it on many, many camps. It has seen blood and red sand, it has been to Europe and it has been confiscated by the airline that sanned [sic] it in my duffelbag, and they gave it back! It hollowed out an old pressure hose and got me on the road again when my car broke down at Daly Waters. I became Venturer leader, and later followed my kids through Joeys, cubs and scouts. And every time the knife came out, I would tell a kid the story of my shame, how you should never steal, and how you should always have the courage to do whats [sic] right.

      Mate, I am soo sorry, and if you pm me your address I will send it off to you. This knife should have been on your adventures and explorations. Crikey, it looks like you were in the friggin Himalayas! I don’t beg your forgiveness, because you owe me nothing. If anything, this knife has done the world a lot of good, but it is yours, and I would be glad to return it, just so you can tell your kids or whoever you want to bequeathe it to when you go.. that this knife has a history, that it did some important stuff, and that it eventually came home.

      Here’s the original story:

      http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2014/01/23/3931107.htm

      Jim

    • Johnson37
      Post count: 5

      sinawalli wrote: [quote=Johnson37]Got this as a gift a few years ago, I have a couple Black Widows and my father thought I would like it. Have any of you ever seen one. I’ve never actually used it just kind of sits around. I have a few CRKT knives I use on a regular bases there great knives.

      That is a very cool knife! What steel is it, who is the maker, what is the OAL? Really like that design!

      Thanks it was made by frost cutlery, for black widow its called cat skinner that’s about all I know.

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Thanks, Jim. I needed that.

      -Ben

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      Here’s a Case I’ve carried everyday since the 70’s. Seen everything from being lost to field dressing duties. If I ever lost it I would be in a crisis:D!

      attached file
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Time to knock the dust off this thread! Here are a couple I finished.

      Top one is a Helle Wind, got the blank off Ebay and made a handle out of a block of black G10. Bottom one is 01 tool steel, there is a hamon on it, but not visible in that pic. Heat treated it myself in a home made forge. Handle is tiger stripe G10.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Thanks for reviving this thread, and nice work on both of those knives. That Helle looks like it would be a heckuva skinner! How do you find working with G10?

      I recently picked up a knife from Lon Humphrey, a little beauty called a “Whiteteil” in dark curly maple handles. 6″ overall, with a 2.5″ cutting edge, 1084 steel.

      Lon makes all of his knives the traditional way – by hand with a hammer and forge, and every one is a little different. Here’s a little video of Lon at work:

    • jpcjpc
      Member
      Post count: 170

      Johnson37 wrote: Got this as a gift a few years ago, I have a couple Black Widows and my father thought I would like it. Have any of you ever seen one. I’ve never actually used it just kind of sits around. I have a few CRKT knives I use on a regular bases there great knives.

      I had the same knive from B Widows years ago

      But the guy who polised the blade did not made a perfect job

      And I coild read on the blade MADE IN CHINA

      Hi Ken Bek you’re a cheater

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote: Thanks for reviving this thread, and nice work on both of those knives. That Helle looks like it would be a heckuva skinner! How do you find working with G10?

      I recently picked up a knife from Lon Humphrey, a little beauty called a “Whiteteil” in dark curly maple handles. 6″ overall, with a 2.5″ cutting edge, 1084 steel.

      Lon makes all of his knives the traditional way – by hand with a hammer and forge, and every one is a little different. Here’s a little video of Lon at work:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knGV4shZEmM

      Thanks! Working with G10 is awful! Incredibly stinky, to the point of sickening! Dust is nasty too. I wear coveralls, respirator, dust proof goggles and a scarf. Everything stinks when I’m done. In summer, I can open the garage doors, not too bad then, but winter, it stinks for awhile!

      I really like that knife pictured in your post! Wood is beautiful! Good score!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote: Working with G10 is awful! Incredibly stinky, to the point of sickening! Dust is nasty too. I wear coveralls, respirator, dust proof goggles and a scarf. Everything stinks when I’m done. In summer, I can open the garage doors, not too bad then, but winter, it stinks for awhile!

      Yeah, that’s kind of what I’d heard. Good on ya for sticking with it!

      sinawalli wrote:

      I really like that knife pictured in your post! Wood is beautiful! Good score!

      Thanks! Wait till you see its big brother….:wink:

    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403

      Smithhammer,

      How do you like the feel if the whitetail? How we’ll does it hold an edge? And how is it to sharpen?

      thanks

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Brennan –

      I really like the way it feels in the hand (I have med/large hands). It’s a small knife, really nice for EDC and more detailed work.

      1084 is a simple carbon tool steel, quite easy to touch up and pretty good edge retention (it’s almost always a trade off between these two things). Lon hardens it to 57-58 HRC, which is a nice sweet spot for a field knife, imo.

      I’ll post a pic soon of it in hand so you can get a sense of size.

    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403

      Thanks Smithhammer I appreciate the info.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Here you go:

      Very handy, easy to carry little knife!

      Lon also makes a slightly larger version called a “Muley.”

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      I inherited these. I was never aware that Case made scissors. They are very good, very sharp. Not a knife I know but “cut”lery for sure. πŸ˜€ Every one needs a good pair of scissors.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Case scissors?!? I had no idea. Any idea how old they are?

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      No idea on the age of those scissors. I’ve been researching but mostly going around in circles. I just never thought of Case for anything but a great knife.

      Apparently their scissors are of as good a quality as their knives from what I can find out.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Those shears are obviously from their kitchen line. I have some Case kitchen knives from the early 80’s so I’m betting due to the plastic sheath it is from that time. Notice the other functions. A bottle opener on the left side finger ring and the grippers just back of the blades for gripping stubborn jar or bottle tops or maybe even a nut cracker! Very cool.

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      Man, I’d go on a date with some of those beauties. Here’s one of about two I’ve used since my late teens. It was a big purchase back when I had even less common cents than I do now. I get attached to things like this and use them forever.

      attached file
    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      I will apologize up front that I can’t post the pictures yet–but Linda promised to show me how tomorrow—But I have received a Sinawalli original and a sheath for it from Duncan. They are both trad works of art. Bill you and Duncan should go into business together:D

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Here are photos

      attached fileattached file
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      [quote=colmike]Here are photos[/quote

      Very nice! I wish I could see leather like that! Great job Duncan!

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Bill, Duncan–sorry the quality of the photo’s don’t reflect your work:?

      After Lin posted the photo’s with some difficulty reducing something called bit size or something and then she saw the posts before mine and said–this is professionally embarrassing–and I said what dear? She said I am a professional photographer and these photo’s you took–suck–look at the others they have correct lighting,background and you idiot.:D

      There was only one thing I could do–blame it on Web mother and her difficult to do site8)

      well that didn’t work either–so my penance is having 3 of our dogs in bed tonight:shock:

      Maybe spring will come soon so I can get out in the woods without running dogs:D

      Mike

    • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 907

      colmike wrote: …There was only one thing I could do–blame it on Web mother and her difficult to do site8)

      well that didn’t work either–so my penance is having 3 of our dogs in bed tonight:shock:

      Maybe spring will come soon so I can get out in the woods without running dogs:D

      Mike

      We don’t have a dog, but I’m sending our annoying cat to sleep with you too! My fault! Ha! Maybe we need Smithhammer to do a photo shoot tutorial, and not just how to load the pictures in a post. If you make your images about medium size (640 px or 8 in) and low quality (72 dpi) they should load on our site just fine.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Pics looked good to me Mike! But I’m on my second rum…:wink:

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Robin

      We eat cats here:D as to the rest of what you sent it’s meaningless to me perhaps Lin can figure it out.

      A tutorial from Bruce would be nice he seems to speak grunt language and post’s great photo’s and video’s. But I will leave that to Lin to figure out.

      Out here tonight 0700 run tomorrow which means 0530 wake up

      but then I will have 3 girls in the bed tonight8).

      You keep up the great work.

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Whew! I was really worried that Mikes knife might not fit the sheath but that looks like a good fit. Which is good since I made a left hand sheath not being sure if Mike was lefty or righty. Well I’m a lefty so now we need a knife to go in it πŸ˜€

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      colmike wrote:

      A tutorial from Bruce would be nice he seems to speak grunt language and post’s great photo’s and video’s.

      Mike –

      I had to go back and look at the pics in question, and I’m afraid that your better half is absolutely right (as usual 8) ).

      I don’t want to write a novel here, but this is my basic recipe for a half-way decent photo:

      Pour yourself a pint of good beer. And I mean good beer, not some syrupy yellow swill. I don’t even care if you like good beer or not, this is work and it’s not supposed to be fun. Now drink.

      I’m assuming you don’t want to drink that pint first thing in the morning, so wait until you have good evening light. Don’t take pics in the middle of the day – the light will either be harsh, or flat. Bottom line – you can’t take a good pic without good light.

      Once you have good light, find a good background. A mesh patio table is not a good background. πŸ™„ Find something that contrasts nicely with the subject of your photo, and that isn’t busy. Once you have these two key factors in place, take another sip or two and savor the fact that you are outside and that life is good.

      Now think about angle and composition. How can you emphasize what you are shooting in an interesting way?

      Once you have truly considered all these things, and you have good light, a fitting background and a good composition, it’s time to take another sip.

      And now for the really hard part – give the camera to Lin and ask here to take some pictures, upload them for you, optimize them using some sort of photo software and crop/resize them appropriately….while you cook her dinner.

      Behind all good photographers there is usually an even more talented assistant.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A recent Natchez-style Bowie that I picked up:

      And a little background on Bowies. Contrary to popular belief, there really is no single “Bowie” knife design, nor even a standard size. Most historians agree that the knife that Jim Bowie used at the infamous Vidalia Sandbar fight, which started the “Bowie” craze, looked nothing like the far more ornate Bowie knives that came later (i.e. the Alamo era), and that most people still think of when they imagine a “Bowie” knife.

      The knives made in and around Natchez that JB was carrying at Vidalia, influenced by Spanish and French knives that were popular at the time, was a far more simple and straightforward knife, with a coffin handle and prominent swedge, like this original:

      Only years later did they evolve into the more well-known style of Bowie with the bulkier blade, exaggerated clip point, full guard, pommel etc:

      Personally, I really prefer the simpler, earlier style of Bowie knife. I’m a sucker for a well-done swedge and a coffin handle. 8)

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Bruce

      :lol::lol::lol:

      I just read your tutorial to the resident photographer who has been trying to beat those techniques in my head for over 25 years. Her comment—well Smithhammer knows what he’s talking about–particularly the last two statements8).

      To sum up—take photo’s only at happy hour (I only drink good beer in jugs from local brew pub, brown and black). while enjoying the pint–supervise my assistant to ensure all your steps are followed:D. Thanks much my friend–those are instructions I can follow.

      Great photo’s of the bowie’s.

      And now we need to help Duncan find a mate for his empty sheath8).

      Last lesson of the day–don’t pick on web-mother-or her cat– the photographer said that she must be a saint to put up with us–at which time I got a backhand–I think it was the we eat cat’s statement.:roll:

      Mike

    • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 907

      colmike wrote: …Last lesson of the day–don’t pick on web-mother-or her cat– the photographer said that she must be a saint to put up with us–at which time I got a backhand–I think it was the we eat cat’s statement.:roll:

      Mike

      Ha ha ha! We hate cats too, so I understand your sentiment. We are training our cat to be a good dog. As for putting up with you guys…remember I’m married to T.J. This is cake for me! Send my best to Lin…I think we’d get along well. Now back to the knife topic…

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      I don’t have many knives because I generally don’t deal with more than one of anything too well. Go figure? This I bought in the mid ’90’s. My high water mark for knives. I just look at it now and then as I’m too sentimental toward my other two. This was made by an old ‘gent, in every sense of the word, Billy Watson from Deatsville, Alabama.

      Mike – I never had much patience for learning how to upload pics and walked off plenty for better things to do. It’s easier done than said is all I can say. Once you get it it’s as easy as eating cherry pie.

      attached file
    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Well here’s Mike’s sheath…..

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      How about a couple of Kukris!!

    • robbin68
      Member
      Post count: 49

      Nice pics guys. I recently purchased a Helle fjording blade with the intent of putting an antler handle on it. This is my first project with a knife. Any pointers??

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      robbin68 wrote: Nice pics guys. I recently purchased a Helle fjording blade with the intent of putting an antler handle on it. This is my first project with a knife. Any pointers??

      Tape up the blade unless you enjoy getting stitched up.;)

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Dig those Khuks!

      I recently came across me gran-pappy’s old draw knife. Needs a good cleaning and sharpening, but plenty of life left in it:

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      I got one of my draw knives from an antique store. A very hard steel that will only sharpen using stones. No file will touch it but the stones will make it shaving sharp.

    • David Bartlett
      Post count: 75

      Here are a couple of mine.

      The Kershaw Black Horse I found on a lake shore when the water was down. It was quite dirty and filled with grit, but cleaned up nice.

      The other is a EKA folder from Sweden, a bit thinner in the handle than the Kershaw, but fits my hand better.

      attached file
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      David Bartlett wrote: Here are a couple of mine.

      The Kershaw Black Horse I found on a lake shore when the water was down. It was quite dirty and filled with grit, but cleaned up nice.

      The other is a EKA folder from Sweden, a bit thinner in the handle than the Kershaw, but fits my hand better.

      FYI, that Kershaw has a lifetime unconditional warranty on it!

    • David Bartlett
      Post count: 75

      sinawalli wrote: [quote=David Bartlett]Here are a couple of mine.

      The Kershaw Black Horse I found on a lake shore when the water was down. It was quite dirty and filled with grit, but cleaned up nice.

      The other is a EKA folder from Sweden, a bit thinner in the handle than the Kershaw, but fits my hand better.

      FYI, that Kershaw has a lifetime unconditional warranty on it!

      The original owner won’t get to take advantage of that, but possibly I will.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      David Bartlett wrote: [quote=sinawalli][quote=David Bartlett]Here are a couple of mine.

      The Kershaw Black Horse I found on a lake shore when the water was down. It was quite dirty and filled with grit, but cleaned up nice.

      The other is a EKA folder from Sweden, a bit thinner in the handle than the Kershaw, but fits my hand better.

      FYI, that Kershaw has a lifetime unconditional warranty on it!

      The original owner won’t get to take advantage of that, but possibly I will.

      Well you can’t beat it! I have a 1550 AO that is about 16 years old, torsion bar broke and lost a couple screws. Emailed Kershaw about it and they had parts mailed out the next day, no questions!

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      We were drinking; mourning the premature loss of our dear friend. He was ten months younger than me and far more experienced in the business of life.

      I’d only picked it up to check if his dad was honoring the blade with a proper edge. Before my onerous critique of his work was done he’d tossed the sheath in my lap. Tears.

      A generous gift from the grieving father of an equally generous young man. Instantly and for ever more, one of my most prized possessions.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Ben,

      Touching story and a fine knife. I picked up two of them on the auction, both cheap, but with a bit of the tips broken off. Makes a great stumping knife with the flat tip sharpened.

      I know you’ll cherish that knife forever. Use it in good health. best, dwc

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Ben,

      A tragic story beautifully told my friend. If a possession should ever be treasured, it’s a thing like that.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514
    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Smithhammer wrote:

      That’s very nice! Love the contrast between spine and edge! That is something I always try and achieve when knife making! They did a great job on it!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      sinawalli wrote:

      That’s very nice! Love the contrast between spine and edge! That is something I always try and achieve when knife making! They did a great job on it!

      Thanks. I figured a knifemaker would appreciate some of the details going on in that knife! It’s hard to convey what a beast it really is – it’s over 9″ long, with a deep blade profile and a hefty spine. It’s a great camp knife, and definitely made to be used hard. Every time I pick it up, I feel like I’m handling a knife that was made hundreds of years ago.

      Lon’s work is the equivalent of the finest custom bowmakers, imo – every knife he makes is unique and unmistakeably made by hand.

    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403
    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403

      Smithhammer,

      Well after looking at the whitetail and debating on the brute de forge I went with the Muley. I will post more pics when I get it back from a friend who is making me a pouch sheath for it. I agree that Lon Humphrey makes a great knife and I can’t wait to abuse it a little.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      I looked on Mr. Humphrey’s site, and $150 (Muley) for a hand forged knife is sick! If our damn dollar was worth something to you guys…. Impossible to go wrong at that price!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Brennan –

      Excellent choice. I think the Muley is a great all-arounder.

      It’s hard to describe, but once you get one of Lon’s knives in your hands, you just want to carry it all the time and use it for everything. And occasionally thrust it high in the air and yell out like a viking.

      Sinawalli –

      Agreed! Did you check out some of his higher-end knives? Still all hand-forged and heat-treated. The only part he doesn’t do himself are the sheaths:

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Sinawalli –

      Agreed! Did you check out some of his higher-end knives? Still all hand-forged and heat-treated. The only part he doesn’t do himself are the sheaths:

      I did, oh yes I did!!!

    • cahaba
      Post count: 4

      A few of mine. Nothing expensive. I use the large knife for making ground blinds and for fire wood and camp chores.

    • Mohawk13
      Post count: 24

      Musk Ox Hunter..Made By Yours truly Burns Green Obsidian blade, Axis Deer antler handle, sinew and pine pitch glue.Musk Ox leg sheath still in the process of being made.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Mohawk13 wrote: Musk Ox Hunter..Made By Yours truly Burns Green Obsidian blade, Axis Deer antler handle, sinew and pine pitch glue.Musk Ox leg sheath still in the process of being made.

      That’s cool! Do you use it? How do you sharpen it?

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      That’s a beautiful piece of work, Mohawk. Love to hear more about it, when you have a chance.

    • Mohawk13
      Post count: 24

      I have field tested it on a beef leg, and it cuts like a scalpel. I have not sharpened it yet, as it is still like a razor. I do have a small copper tool that I can knapp a new edge on it if needed..Looking forward to using it this fall in Utah on either a deer or elk, depending on how well My hunts go.

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      Mohawk13 wrote: Musk Ox Hunter..Made By Yours truly Burns Green Obsidian blade, Axis Deer antler handle, sinew and pine pitch glue.Musk Ox leg sheath still in the process of being made.

      Forgive me. Jesus! What a rockin’ piece of work! That’s beautiful.

    • David Bartlett
      Post count: 75

      paleoman wrote: [quote=Mohawk13]Musk Ox Hunter..Made By Yours truly Burns Green Obsidian blade, Axis Deer antler handle, sinew and pine pitch glue.Musk Ox leg sheath still in the process of being made.

      Forgive me. Jesus! What a rockin’ piece of work! That’s beautiful.

      X2

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      x3

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      I bought a brand new Buck 112 Ranger for my son. (Pictured next to my 110.) I’m going to surprise him with this knife as an opening day gift. Three more months–how will I be able to wait that long?! He’ll have this thing forever.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      What a great gift, Ben. I remember coveting my Dad’s #110 as a kid! I bet he’ll treasure it forever, and may it bring him good luck afield!

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      [quote=Ben M.]I bought a brand new Buck 112 Ranger for my son. (Pictured next to my 110.) I’m going to surprise him with this knife as an opening day gift. Three more months–how will I be able to wait that long?! He’ll have this thing forever.

      That’s awesome Ben! Those gifts from father to son are real treasures.

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      I was at the 2014 MOjam selfbow gathering last week and had a chance to spend some time with master blacksmith John Murray. Here’s a bit of his work.

      Seax knife. Rowan wood handle. Handmade hammers in the background.

      Some of John’s fantastic hatchets. Someday I’ll own one.

      John explaining the particulars of a sort of “poor man’s sword” he’s got in the works. (I can’t remember the name of this instrument.) That’s a 33″ arrow for size reference. On the left are two of his yew warbows. One pulls 125# and the other 162#. Man-eaters.

      Some of John’s work that went home with other guys.

      The Seax knife came home with me. For size reference, that’s a 2×12 underneath it.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Wow, Ben – I can see why you couldn’t walk away from that Seax. It’s a beauty!

      And those hatchet heads deserve to be hung! I’d really like try out that bearded one.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A new (to me) Marble’s Trailmaker from back when they were still being made in Gladstone, MI. Still in the box and with the original sheath. 7-1/8″ blade of 5160 carbon steel, 12-3/8″ overall.

      Webster Marbles was once quoted as saying, “there is no one cutting tool that will serve as many purposes as the Trailmaker.”

      πŸ˜‰

    • burgess
      Post count: 24

      have a drawer full of store bought…..custom…..but down the road i decided that none equaled the d.h. russel original belt knife design……..the original design is always in my pack…….the trout and bird design [ the smaller blade in the photo ] is my neck knife and i can’t count the number of whitetail it has boned out……….for the money…….not a better blade out there.

      attached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Agreed, Burgess – those Canadian belt knives are a great design. Quite underrated, I think, until you use one for a bit, and then all of the thought that has gone into the design becomes apparent. I have one of the “Bird & Trout” models as well, and it’s cleaned a lot of birds and fish!

    • Sveltri
      Member
      Post count: 2

      <img src="” alt=”” />

      My first custom. Made by Wayne Depperschmidt.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      That’s really nice. I like that handle big time.

    • Wolfshead
      Post count: 82

      Here is my trad knife. I made it myself from an edger blade and some Osage for the scales.

      And here is one I made from some 1095 and whitetail antler for the handle. I made it for my Brother Inlaw from the same pattern that my Osage was made from just fitted to the antler.

      Carved a deer profile in the butt

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Nice work there, Wolfshead! Those look like very useful littls knives – I like the blade/handle ratio.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      My favorite knife, a Bark River Bushcrafter. The handle is maple, and reminds of a nebula…or should I say “knebula”. The only thing I don’t like about it is that the compass doesn’t seem to work.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Just need to keep it pointed in the right direction. πŸ˜€

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      R2 wrote: Just need to keep it pointed in the right direction. πŸ˜€

      You’re right! I didn’t realize it’s one of those “manual compasses”. πŸ˜†

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      That’s a beauty Patrick. Love the maple handle.

    • charlines
      Post count: 12

      This is my first Knife. My father gave it to me for my 10th birthday (45 years ago). It is a MUELA. An old knife maker from Albacete (Spain) that still makes formidable knifes nowadays. Mine is a hand made model from the mid 60′ with deer horn handle.

      I still use it but try hard not to lose it in the woods

    • Todd Smith
      Post count: 167

      Made this one under the watchful eye of Joe Keeslar:

      A favorite, Case I reshaped the blade a bit on:

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Both great looking knives, Todd.

      The top one has just the kind of gently-sloping drop point, almost to the lateral line, that I really like.

      Probably my favorite all-around hunting knife – a Bark River “Fox River” has a similar profile. Btw, I used this knife on a deer a few weeks ago, and I’m really impressed with the CPM3V steel on this model. Even after quartering and dressing a good-sized deer, and without me being particularly careful at separating joints, nicking bone while separating the loins, etc. I brought the knife home, cleaned it up and without touching up the edge at all it was still slicing paper cleanly:

      Ten minutes later, with a leather strop and a little compound it was easily shaving sharp again. The edge retention of 3V is seriously impressive.

    • Todd Smith
      Post count: 167

      Yeah, that’s a really nice looking knife. I have admired Bark River Knives for a while now. Todd

    • tailfeather
      Post count: 417

      Have any of you owned a knife from Lucas Forge (Lucas Bullington)? Ran into a trad hunter on some public land near here….his knife caught my eye, and he gave me the info on the maker. I really like the Packer model in a curly maple handle (below). 3.5″ blade, 8″ overall. Just wondering.

      attached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      tailfeather –

      I had not heard of Lucas, but I just spent some time on his site. Nice looking, no-nonsense knives in a reliable tool steel. That Packer pictured above is a beauty, and a 3.5″ blade is just about perfect, imo, for all-around use. In addition to the Packer model, I also like the looks of his Nessmuk and Jack Pine blades (I’m generally a sucker for Canadian/leaf blade designs).

      But a 6-7 month wait time – wow! 😯

    • tailfeather
      Post count: 417

      Yep, and I like the Kephart too. But the wait time is crazy….I periodically check the in-stock models to see if one I want is available. Is that good steel for a one-deer-without-resharpening blade?

      *edit: Now that I look at it, that Nessmuk shortened to a 3.5″ blade may be the ticket.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      tailfeather wrote: Is that good steel for a one-deer-without-resharpening blade?

      Most knife steels, whether carbon or stainless, are going to be a trade-off between edge retention and ease of sharpening, as the factors that dictate the former are the same that affect the latter. In my experience, I would say O1 has “ok” edge retention for tasks like getting through a whole deer without needing to re-sharpen. But, on the other hand, O1 is an easy steel to quickly touch up and maintain in the field.

      Here’s a useful little chart for comparing carbon steel attributes:

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      tailfeather wrote: Have any of you owned a knife from Lucas Forge (Lucas Bullington)? Ran into a trad hunter on some public land near here….his knife caught my eye, and he gave me the info on the maker. I really like the Packer model in a curly maple handle (below). 3.5″ blade, 8″ overall. Just wondering.

      That’s a beauty! I hate looking at all these bows and knives. Makes me want more. πŸ‘Ώ

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      The handle of this knife is the part of the muskox horn on top of the skull.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      John. That’s beautiful. Can you tell more about the blade section? The handle looks like a stone or shell. Dwc

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      John

      In addition to that welcome aboard I believe you are going to add more meaning to Traditional. Beautiful knife. And a quote for you and the Mrs.

      “The arctic explorer asked the Inuit–How far to that range of mountains?” And the Inuit responded—“Bad dogs far off–good dogs close too”.

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      Smithhammer wrote: I came across this little video recently, and thought it would be a worthy addition to the ‘trad knife’ thread. How to make a folding flint and bone pocket knife. Stick with it – the end result is pretty awesome:

      http://youtu.be/hZUQ1kfZY5k

      Cool little video my wife and i really enjoyed it.

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      dwcphoto wrote: John. That’s beautiful. Can you tell more about the blade section? The handle looks like a stone or shell. Dwc

      It was hand made by a friend of mine here. The handle of this knife is the part of the muskox horn on top of the skull. The part that they smash together.The blade has a piece of brass on the top. I hold it by the brass part when skinning it works really well for me that way.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Bruce– I love your Chan quote! Can you offer a citation so I can further explore it/him? Thanks, dp

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      John – that’s a very interesting knife. How long is it?

      Dave – I actually knew nothing about Francis Chan when I came across that quote, but I liked it. Turns out he’s a Christian minister, with an interesting/atypical approach. If you Google him, you’ll find all kinds of info.

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      Smithhammer wrote: John – that’s a very interesting knife. How long is it?

      Dave – I actually knew nothing about Francis Chan when I came across that quote, but I liked it. Turns out he’s a Christian minister, with an interesting/atypical approach. If you Google him, you’ll find all kinds of info.

      about 10 inch

    • FallguyFallguy
      Member
      Post count: 317

      Here is a knife that a good friend made me years ago it is patterned off a flint blade that was in a museum in Nebraska some place if I remember right. Don it is not around to ask where exactly anymore.

      attached file
    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Scagel “Medium Bowie” – stacked leather and stag, onr of my favorite combos.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Beauty. Nice background, too. Seems like I’ve see that somewhere…. dwc

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A couple of Lon Humphrey’s knives played pivotal roles in a fine meal of elk backstraps with some friends the other night…

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Stumpkiller wrote:

      [image]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v169/Stumpkiller/Accoutrements/DSCN1069_zps17c8d816.jpg[/image]

      I was just going back through this thread, and realized I’d somehow I missed this post, Stumpkiller. That’s a fine pair of blades you have there. I tried to read the maker’s name etched on the blade, but couldn’t quite make it out – can you give any more details? They remind me of some examples I’ve seen from Finnish maker, Puukkojunkkari.

      I currently have a puukko in reindeer antler/curly birch (4.7″ blade) made by Harri Merimaa en route from Finland. I’ll post some pics when it arrives.

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Well, I received a very nice gift from a workmate yesterday. It’s a Benchmade Bone collector caping knife. A real little beauty.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Jim

      Wow what a gift. Nice bow how is she shooting for you?

      Mike

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      Just got this one last week Caribou Antler

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      John

      Very nice:D. Your other post reminded me I gotta take a picture of my bag.

      Mike

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      John, nice knife. Was it made locally? Dwc

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      Ya it was made buy i guy here that i can’t spell the name of.

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      colmike wrote: Jim

      Wow what a gift. Nice bow how is she shooting for you?

      Mike she’s shooting really nice. I’m always impressed at how smooth the draws and quiet the release is.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Jim–not to steal this thread,but I’m glad to hear that. You know at last years ETAR I must have shot every R/D longbow and Hill style that was there and in the end I went back to my Java man with no regrets on the purchase. Don’t hesitate to send Greg a note concerning his craftsmanship.

      Stay safe and take care of that knee.

      Mike

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      John – that’s a very interesting knife. How exactly is the tang mounted into the handle?

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      Smithhammer wrote: John – that’s a very interesting knife. How exactly is the tang mounted into the handle?

      The handle is hollowed out so it fits tight the held in please with sewin alot stronger then it looks and real trad style.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I just have to post this beauty. It’s an Arno Bernard Porcupine with mammoth molar handle. I had noticed that they advertise in Traditional Bowhunter Magazine, so I was checking them out, and I just couldn’t resist this little guy. The sheath is cape buffalo. I only wish that the sheath was designed for horizontal carry, as it’s the perfect size for it.

      attached file
    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      That my friend is a very pretty looking knife that may also be very useful.

      Handle reminds me of tigers eye stone.

      Mark.

    • jpcarlson
      Member
      Post count: 218

      I start with these; hand forged Norwegian knife blades with laminated edge steel.

      Then we make these; Norwegian belt knives made by my father and I. We build the handle around the blade, then the sheath around the knife.

    • John Dilts
      Post count: 135

      LOoking Good

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Really nice! Next time do a video and post it on youtube with a link here. Those are really nice. If you need storage space let me know. Dwc

    • FallguyFallguy
      Member
      Post count: 317

      That is some very nice wood and leather work.:D

    • Mountain ManMountain Man
      Member
      Post count: 41
    • Mountain ManMountain Man
      Member
      Post count: 41
    • Mountain ManMountain Man
      Member
      Post count: 41

      Boy i gota keep this thread going hunh

      Finally got a hunting knife ive been looking for for awhile

      Im gona have a sheath made to piggy back these two

    • Mountain ManMountain Man
      Member
      Post count: 41
    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Birthday gift today from my daughter…………….

      Way proud of the knife and the young woman…….

    • Collar DentCollar Dent
      Member
      Post count: 1

      I like to make knives myself, this is my hobby.
      As a child, I liked to sculpt different figures from wood. My knives must satisfy the following requirements: β€’ high-quality steel, from which they will be made;
      ergonomic (comfortable) handles;
      the relative ease of manufacture; reliability. I try to do something like this

      https:// mechanicguides.com/ best-pocket-knife-for-whittling/

    • Aaron BenwareAaron Benware
      Member
      Post count: 8

      I am new to Tradbow. I would like to share a few knives that I have made. They are all hunter/skinners. They are made from 1095. Cut out with a hacksaw and beveled with a bastard file. Heat treated in my coffee can forge and hand polished down to 600 grit. I etched my logo in the blade. Deer antler with my initials. I also made the sheaths. Made my own leather stamps(deer print and oak leaves). It was very enjoyable. The small knife on top was for my wife, then the 3 below it was for my brother and a couple friends. The dark wood was Bocate and the lighter was Honduran Rosewood. These were made 2 summers ago. I planned on more last summer, but built my hunting camp instead.

      knives

      knives 2

       

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Hi AaronΒ  – welcome

      Nicely done — sheaths also, a lot of people make good knives but skimp on the sheaths – yours are well done imho (I do some leatherwork myself ). I am impressed you made your own stamps as they look very professional. I like 1095, good all around steel.

      Are you going to leave the wood in its natural State ? Or do you have some oil on them, I can’t see in the pics?

      Scout

      • Aaron BenwareAaron Benware
        Member
        Post count: 8

        Scout- Thank you. I coated them in Tung oil. I guess I never got a picture of them completely finished. LOL

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Aaron

      Nice grain – I bet they look fine with an oil finish.

      Scout

    • Aaron BenwareAaron Benware
      Member
      Post count: 8

      These are a couple more pictures of my wifes little Hunter/Skinner in process.

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