Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 976 through 990 (of 1,015 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    David Petersen wrote: Jim — That is an odd bird you have there. Wing and body conformation look like a vulture or raptor, but the face seems wholly owlish. We’re you wearing a rabbit-skin hat? 😆

    I was only wearing my own thinning excuse for a pelt. He was very curious, though, circling me a few times. Maybe he was hoping I was about to keel over and he could have something besides wallaby for dinner 😛

    It’s funny all you guys mentioned Kites because my infantile bird watching skills short listed it to a couple of local varieties of the same. Dave, I think the owlish appearance might just be a visual trick in the shot where he’s looking right at the camera. I have some blurry shots of his head side on and he looks more classic hawk/eagle.

    Tradhunter, we have a type of eagle here that’s wingspan is longer than I am tall and is known to eat tasty little sheep in lambing season. My photogenic friend above would be maybe half the size of a wedgetail.

    R2, fire and drought are part of life down here, I’d hope we’d be halfway decent in our management, but trust me we are far from perfect. The worst drought in my lifetime resulted in kids only a couple hundred kilometres from the coast who were 8,9,10 years old and had never seen rain, only heard or read about it. Now we’ve had a few years straight of seasonal flooding. Farmers can’t catch a break!

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    Thanks Dave, the cat wearing the citrus helmet was a worry. Perhaps he was trying to stop aliens from reading his mind? Silly cat, aluminium helmet 😕

    Brenn, I just ordered the tiger, and a couple of others. Better be good!

    I don’t have a trail cam but I was out scouting some new places the other day and someone started checking me out…

    I’m new to the area and I’m not sure exactly what breed of pigeon that is, but there were plenty of wallabies around. Alas native animals are off the list for me, but it looked like good pig country, so I’ll keep looking 😛

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    I keep coming back to this thread with the self sadistic purpose of a dieting man walking past a mcdonalds. I am so wildly jealous of predators you guys share your world with.

    A few years ago I heard a ranger discuss the growing problem with feral cats in Australia, not just in population but in size. They’re trapping cats a few generations wild from domestic ferals that are as big as cattle dogs. They’re not taking roos yet but will tackle wallabies (similar in size to a big hare I think).

    Anyway, my little peanut brain blends this information with a book I read discussing the history of animal domestication that compared the lack of genetic experimentation in cats to the wide variation produced in canines, from lapdogs to Irish Wolfhounds and Neo. Mastiffs. In spite of the turbulent effects introduced animals like cats and foxes have on native populations, I can’t help but hope some ancestor of mine will share a mountain range or a deep creek lined valley with a cat big enough to make him look over his shoulder.

    I mean this in the best of spirits, but screw you guys and your wealth in wildlife 😛

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: Giving It Up #54227

    An aeroplane pilot once explained to me the technical, aerodynamic differences between helicopters and planes. He said planes are so beautiful that angels carry them into the sky, whereas helicopters are so ugly the Earth repels them from it’s surface. Sounds legit 😛

    I jump out of planes for a living and I s#$t myself every time. In my leisure time I like to keep both feet on the ground like R2 😉

    James Harvey
    Member
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: How times change. #54054

    Steve Graf wrote: So choose your best broadhead, and your best ideas. But keep your eyes wide open and reconsider each critically for reason and purpose every time you have a new experience or obtain new knowledge. And give your fellow man the benefit of the doubt.

    Very well said Steve, and thank you all for your shared thoughts.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: long shots #50667

    Just ran across a website of a self advertised ‘shooting and hunting expert’ who runs marksmanship courses. The site is littered with phrases such as “1000 yard guarantee or your money back”, “never pass up your trophy again”, “{this rifle/scope} is ready to shoot 1000 yards right out of the box”.

    I watched some of this guys videos and to be honest, he and his ‘crew’ seem to be proficient with their weapons and application. He is landing tight groups at 1000 yards in various conditions, and applying all that to the animals he shoots as well.

    But man, I am, in some regards, a professional shooter and work with professional shooters. I really reckon there is no way you can effectively teach anyone to shoot tight enough groups at 1000 yards in just 2 days to then ethically let them loose on animals with the intention of stretching out that far. It is not as simple as grouping very tight at 100 yards and extrapolating that out to 1000. There are many more variables coming into play, that only experience can really account for.

    There is (brief) ethical discussion on his site as well. As is so often the case, he takes the same point I consider a negative and argues it is a positive.

    “One of the good things about Long Range Hunting is we can move into these areas without the animals even knowing we are here. We can pinpoint them from a long ways away, get setup and take the shot. The 1,029-yard shot was a relaxed shot for me and a relaxed shot for the animal. He wasn’t all wound up.”

    I find something in that valid. It is great he can kill an animal and minimise it’s distress. But as has been discussed here and I feel likewise, that closing into the animals sensory range is a key part of the ethical hunt. From the animals pov, better distressed and alive then calm and dead.

    Finally consider the implications of a people able to atv or dirt bike through rugged terrain, set up a hide on top of a feature and reach out for 1000 yards around. I suppose if your motivations for hunting are as simple as making a living animal dead, this course would be great. I like to think there is more to it than that.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: long shots #49615

    Wexbow wrote: Jim, that’s an interesting statement but I think the difficulty lies in the word recreational – it can be hard to justify any recreational act beyond that it fills a void in our existence. Have a read of Gregory Clark’s article in the Dec/Jan issue of TBM for an interesting take on what I’m referring to.

    Hey Wex,

    I don’t mean to justify it as a pass time that adds value to my life or anything like that. I meant an ethical justification. To pursue an activity whose end could very well be the death of a wild animal.

    I have had this discussion in my head several times. How do I justify killing the animal? I could just as easily stalk with my camera as with my bow and take that kind of shot instead. I don’t need the meat. I have never come up with a satisfying answer to that. That intellectual void doesn’t stop me from doing it, it simply exists.

    As an aside, in Australia it’s usually illegal to hunt native fauna of any description. All introduced species here are broadly catalogued as ‘pests’ however and are fair game. The most common justification I hear here is that we are providing a conservation service by eliminating pest species. The irony of a European driving a car along a highway to reach ‘the wilderness’ and there kill a pig or buffalo and justify it as removing an introduced pest that is damaging our fragile ecosystem is a bit too much to swallow IMHO.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: Macaulay Library #49441

    Thanks Mike, that is really neat.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: long shots #48797

    I have a flair for stating the obvious, so I’ll begin by apologising if the following is so obvious as to be painful. But no one else has said it so here goes 😛

    In recent history, the long shot by the sniper has been a much publicised and glorified achievement. And rightly so. But that achievement is not a fine performance of marksmanship in a vacuum. That is an unseen soldier reaching far across a battlefield and touching an enemy. The result, whether the enemy is killed, maimed or simply scared away falls somewhere on a sliding scale of success.

    But hunting an animal is in no way a battle. A recreational hunter taking a shot on an animal at the wavering limits of his skill is a shameful act (I speak from experience). Quite different to stretching out as far as you can to effect a battlespace, taking the chance of gifting an animal with mutilation for the sake of your own petty ego is nothing short of cowardice . There are perfectly decent targets to prove to yourself how far you can reach out with a weapon, be it a bullet or an arrow (or a crossbow bolt). A living, breathing animal, living it’s life is no such target.

    To be honest, I have never heard or read what I consider to be a wholly justifiable argument for recreational hunting. But there is certainly no justification for using an animal as a testing ground for the limits of your marksmanship.

    I am happy to face disagreement, I am in possession of an overflowing, flood like lack of wisdom. But there is my little peanut brained contribution to an otherwise stimulating discussion 🙂

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: Gettin' Out… #45298

    Great pics mate, thanks for sharing.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: Glove vs. tab #44360

    I’ve always poo-poo’d gloves, but my wife was insistent that she get one recently, and being the selfish consumer husband that I am, I decided if she gets one so do I. I love it. It’s a damascus doe skin glove and it feels great. I think my already overworked peanut brain has a little more to think about on the release now, but there is a nice ‘feel’ to it, and I’m looking forward to not stressing over dropping a tab in the bush 😛

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    (whispers) There is a deer… right behind you!

    Hah, nicely done mate. Rabbit stew!

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    Prairie Prowler and others – I don’t like crossbows, where I’m from they’re legally restricted and controlled in the same way as firearms (I think for the sole safety reason that they can be ‘loaded’ and consequently can be unintentionally discharged).

    The vast majority of arguments I see made against xbows would be equally applicable to traditional v compound bows as well. Which is an argument already lost in the public sphere of debate. The non-hunter (read legislator) doesn’t seem to care about all the arguments that we seem to find self evident.

    Honestly, in all the reading I’ve done the only argument that I’ve read that is not a rehash of the anti-compound bow debate is that a bow must be drawn in the presence of your quarry, where a xbow does not. I think the gravity of that difference will be very much lost on the non-hunter.

    I don’t envy you guys having to fight this battle at all. But I think all the arguments I’ve seen made are pretty well doomed to failure from the start, if for no other reason than historical precedence.

    Just one more peanut opinion to consider.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    That Roycroft get up looks great. I will be giving that a go!

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: What if …? #41813

    WICanner wrote: I guess they think there are extra ‘points’ given for long range shots. As I said before, it’s a feather that they want to place in their cap.

    I think you’re spot on. My little peanut mind likes to break up hunting into two broad skill groups: Marksmanship and Woodcraft. One takes considerably more effort than the other to apply, and the lazy hunter is inclined to prove his marksmanship over his woodcraft. I shouldn’t be too judgemental though, because I used to be the lazy hunter and it’s hard for me to differentiate between my matured interest in woodcraft and the growing admission that I’m an ordinary marksman.

    I still think there are worse things than a long shot though. The other day I watched a video on youtube of ‘bowhunters’ plugging away from a treestand at pigs and deer that were nicely framed by the tripod legs of a large feeder. It was honestly one of the most sickening things I have seen in a while.

Viewing 15 posts - 976 through 990 (of 1,015 total)