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  • James Harvey
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    Post count: 1119

    David, coming from a continent where there are no large land predators left, that is pure magic. Thank you for sharing the pics.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    David Petersen wrote: Ausjim (and others), I just ordered a QuickClot online.

    You won’t regret it David. The stuff is magic for a deep flesh wound.

    Another item I always take out field (if I’m going for multiple nights) that is not a life saver but rather useful is superglue. I use it on little cuts, particularly on your hands where band-aids or tape are hard to use. It’ll hold a small cut closed and seal it to the outside world. In about a day the glue flakes off and your cut is healed up. Just make sure you keep it in a zip seal bag, I had a tube explode in my FA kit once. Rather inconvenient.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    One night in north Queensland, which is usually pretty hot I had an Antarctic breeze blow all the way across the continent just for my benefit. I had left my main camp earlier in the day with nothing but trousers, shirt and hat for clothes. In an act of desperation I took my knife and cut a big heap of the long dead grass on the hill and packed it tight into my shirt for insulation. It made me slightly less miserable and took my mind off freezing for a little while at least. There’s nothing worse than being wet and cold, but that dry night with grass stuffed in my shirt always stands out as ‘simple’ 😛

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    lyagooshka wrote: ausjim,

    “High and tight” for sake of erring on the side of caution is ok, but make sure there is some common sense as well. You see someone lose a foot at the ankle, a tourniquet to the groin will work, but so will one at the knee, and one at the ankle. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong, but my training was always the opposite. It was always as close to the wound as possible (“up-stream” of course).

    Hi Alex,

    Again, my understanding is that the ‘as close as possible’ was taught because of concern that you may lose tissue below the tourniquet.

    So we were taught that as first aiders our only consideration was saving a life until real medical aid could be secured. If someone has an arterial bleed, seconds count, so an advantage of ‘high and tight’ means you aren’t wasting time assessing once that bleed is identified. Another advantage of high and tight is you dodge a lot of the very compressible large muscles and get a good strong clamp on the femur/humerus. Finally if you have to move the person, a CAT up in the groin/armpit is better protected. More than one soldier has bled out while being moved because a CAT has come undone before anyone noticed.

    All that being said, I’m no medic so if you’ve been taught different, I’m not suggesting you throw that out the window. I can only share what I’ve been taught 😉

    Really good point about the beacon.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    pothunter wrote: a word of caution if you have not done so find out just when these should be used as there is no turning back if they are improperly applied.

    Yeah, I understand they were out of favour for a long time because of the risk of losing any part of the limb below the tourniquet. I can’t talk technically as I’m rather uneducated in the medical field, but what I have been told by those who do know is that a CAT can be applied for hours and the limb saved, and a wound deserving a CAT would likely kill in minutes so you’re better off minus a leg than a life anyway.

    For interests sake I have been trained to apply it as high and tight as possible on the damaged limb (e.g. right up in the groin on the leg) regardless of how low the amputation/arterial bleed is (e.g. below the knee). The docs are that confident they can save the tissue below the tourniquet. I guess they’re also confident a dumb first aider like me isn’t going to accurately assess how far the severed artery is going to draw back into the limb, so better make sure I get it up high.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    Hey Michael,

    A couple of years ago my alice frame snapped and I wanted a new pack. I couldn’t afford one but I could afford a new frame. I got this one from SORD:

    http://www.sordaustralia.com/product.php?productid=19

    I’ve been really happy with it. Light, comfortable and strong. It’s survived a hand full of combat load parachute jumps and a few hundred kilometres of stomping and shows no signs of wear or stress. I have occasionally packed over 50kg (110 lbs?) which is never comfortable but it was better with that frame than my old aluminium one. The kidney pad is delightful.

    A consideration for that is it’s a bit long so if you’re under 5’10 it may be no good for you.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    Brennan, that looks like a quality pack. I used their ‘3day assault pack’ for an extended period recently. M. Ranch make good stuff. I treated mine like crap and it never let me down. I love the 3 zip design and external webbing. What colour did you get?

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    Has anyone ever tried hunting with an old military H-harness? Something like this:

    (That is not mine, just a pic I found online)

    If you’re thorough with attaching pouches (using zip ties where they’re loose) it doesn’t rattle. You can carry quite a lot of weight (around 20 pounds was standard with up to 4 litres of water), it adds a little to your width when passing through bush but it has nothing in the way on front so you can lay on your guts rather comfortably.

    It would be very achievable to overnight with it if it isn’t too cold out, especially if you had a camel back on. With 4x 1 litre water bottles and a 2L camelback you’re packing 6L of clean water, plenty of space for food, gas or hexamine cooking gear, first aid, and some key cold weather items (e.g. thermal shirt, hat, gloves).

    I have never tried hunting or bow shooting in them. Can anyone see any immediate flaws with using something like that?

    (and apologies for bringing up such an old conversation, I’m new here and enjoying reading all the old ones.)

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119
    in reply to: New books #18356

    lyagooshka wrote: eBooks, my friends.

    Yesterday I downloaded ‘Hunting with the Bow & Arrow’ by Saxton Pope for the modest price of $0.00 (from Amazon). That’s rather good value I’d say.

    Jim.

    James Harvey
    Member
    Post count: 1119

    QuikClot, bandage and a tourniquet. The Israeli bandage is incredibly versatile and easy to use. The CAT is lightweight, robust and easy to use even one handed. You can carry all that in a cargo pocket or small zippered pouch and will save a life if you cut something important on you or someone you’re fond of.

    http://www.amazon.com/Israeli-Battle-Dressing-Compression-Bandage/dp/B003DPVERM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358003328&sr=8-1&keywords=israeli+trauma+bandage

    http://www.amazon.com/CAT-C-A-T-Combat-Application-Tourniquet/dp/B003IPZRYI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358003913&sr=8-1&keywords=tourniquet+cat

Viewing 10 posts - 1,006 through 1,015 (of 1,015 total)