Home Forums Bows and Equipment Tuning wood shafts

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    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      I’ve been messing around with carbons since I started this sillyness 4 or 5 yrs ago .{Makes me a rookie right] . So I’m determened to try some wood arrows this season ,at least for 3-D . So whats the rundown on tuning these guys. I don’t suppose I can cut them on my carbon saw?

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Mikelee,

      Yes you can use your carbon saw to cut woods. Just change the blade. If your saw is a standard apple brand you can find a small wood blade that will work on it just fine. When I was in the arrow business I found a blade at one of the big box stores that worked great. I could cut 12 shafts with the wood blade just as fact as carbon with the abrasive blade.

      Other than that you tune the same. Instead of removing the nock and trimming from the rear you pull the point and trim from the front.

      Troy

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      One thing to keep in mind with building wood arrows is grain orientation. Wood shafts are spined on the edge of the grain, so make sure you make your arrow so the grain runs perpendicular to the bow (i.e. With your bow straight up and down, the arrow grain runs left and right. If you make them so the grain direction is random, your spine will also be random. Aside from that, the tuning is the same as with any other arrow shaft type.

    • ChumpMcgee
      Member
      Post count: 252

      J.Wesbrock wrote: One thing to keep in mind with building wood arrows is grain orientation. Wood shafts are spined on the edge of the grain, so make sure you make your arrow so the grain runs perpendicular to the bow (i.e. With your bow straight up and down, the arrow grain runs left and right. If you make them so the grain direction is random, your spine will also be random. Aside from that, the tuning is the same as with any other arrow shaft type.

      I never would have thought about that. I am still in a big debate with myself to start making my own arrows. I think it would be a blast but currently I do not have any space where I live…once I own a house and stop renting then I will get more serious.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Another thing to keep in mind when buying wood shafts or completed arrows is to make sure they are matched in not only spine but weight. Wood shafts, being a natural material, can vary by over 100 grains, even in the same spine group. I learned the hard way many years ago to specifically ask about shafts being weight matched before buying them when I ended up with a dozen shafts that were so far apart in weight they were useless to me. From that point on not only did I make sure they were weight matched before putting down my money, but I made sure they weighed the same as what I was already shooting. 

       

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Don’t forget about the straightness of the grain either. The straighter the grain the better the shaft. You can buy deals on shafts, but find out after you get them that the grain runs off at mid shaft. Straight grain is the number one thing when it comes to the strength of the shaft as well as being able to keep them straight.

      Also check on what sealer is being used (if buying ready made arrows). Not all sealers will hold out moisture.

      When I shot wood shafts I would straighten them, then I sealed my shafts with a mixture of epoxy and acetone (commonly called the Massie finish).

      Gasket lacquer works great as a cap sealer over other types of finish, but is something I found not to be that great when used by it’self.

      Troy

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Sounds like the best way to get consistency with wood is to buy spined shafts in larger quantities .then group them by spine, weight ,and grain , before actually building your arrows. Thanks for sharing your knowlege. I guess this is what Fred A. meant by avoiding easier ! Lol.:D

    • sagebrush
      Post count: 52

      I worry more about spine than about the weight of each shaft. Maybe it’s my shooting ability but I can’t seem to tell that much difference in the weight and how they shoot. Spine on the other hand can make a lot of difference. Gary

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Ok . Second dumb question . When tuning , do you reglue the points on each time after cutting the shafts ? These are arrows that already have the fletching on .

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Mike,

      Yes, heat the point to remove it. then after cutting to length regrind the taper and glue the point back on.

      Troy

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Phew ! Thats a lot of work. Lol! Thanks for sharing the info. Now I juat have to wait for the darn things to get here . Prob. sent by dog sled ! 😆

    • Fletcher
      Post count: 177

      If you are serious about shooting wood arrows, I recommend investing in a set of test arrows covering the span of spines you figure you will shoot. If you don’t know your spine, a good fletcher can point you where you need to be. These arrows can be cut to your desired length and you let the arrows tell you what spine you need. I prefer the arrows to be marked with their actual spine rather than a 5-6 lb group and find paper tuning with fletched arrows to be better than bareshafting when tuning wood arrows. Bareshaft arrows can fly pretty sideways and woods tend to break when they hit a target that way.

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Ok so the wood arrows arrived the other day (takes about 3 weeks to get up here) . Now I know what port orford cedar smells like ! that alone is addicting .:D

      they are spined @ 70-75 . I’m shooting them out of a 55# recurve . My draw is around 29″ And the shafts are 33″ right now , with a 145gr. point. I’m going to try some heavier points , hoping I can shorten them up a bit (31″) without them being too stiff . So far they are grouping real nice froim 15 to 30 meters.

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Regarding these pre-fletched shafts . I noticed that they are in fact somwhat random in thier nock placement as far as grain orintation. So I think next batch will be finished shafts only .

    • Chad Sivertsen
      Post count: 84

      Much good advice here. I shoot recurves, longbows, and selfbows with a variety of wood arrows. I mark all of my arrows with length, spine and weight. Near the nock using a fine marker write that info for quick reference.

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      More good advice ! Thanks Chad.

    • Snag32
      Post count: 9

      The nock alignment is for safety reasons too. If the nock is aligned with the grain, instead of perpendicular to it, when shot it can result in a split or exploded shaft! Very important to get this right.

    • marinenelson
      Post count: 20

      tkohlhorst wrote: [quote=J.Wesbrock]One thing to keep in mind with building wood arrows is grain orientation. Wood shafts are spined on the edge of the grain, so make sure you make your arrow so the grain runs perpendicular to the bow (i.e. With your bow straight up and down, the arrow grain runs left and right. If you make them so the grain direction is random, your spine will also be random. Aside from that, the tuning is the same as with any other arrow shaft type.

      I never would have thought about that. I am still in a big debate with myself to start making my own arrows. I think it would be a blast but currently I do not have any space where I live…once I own a house and stop renting then I will get more serious.

      Don’t let renting stop you, I made a take down recurve on an apartment back padio, and several longbows in rental houses. When the Marine Corps moves you, you just set up shop where you can. there is not much that is more satisfying than using equipment you made yourself.

    • Bitter
      Post count: 7

      I have built lots of my own shafts out of Douglas fir, spruce

      and western larch, and out of vg bamboo. the last 2 are what I have found to be the best and the strongest. Its lots of fun and a chalenge. I have one of those veritas arrow makers wear you spin a half inch square wood stock threw it with a fast drill gun. Make shr you get strait grain wood for best performance. I am looking to sell my arrow maker becouse I am making arrows in bigger quanitys.In all 4 types.

      I will be back if any want to know more info on how the veritas arrow maker works.

      Jonathan

    • marinenelson
      Post count: 20

      Bitter wrote: I have built lots of my own shafts out of Douglas fir, spruce

      and western larch, and out of vg bamboo. the last 2 are what I have found to be the best and the strongest. Its lots of fun and a chalenge. I have one of those veritas arrow makers wear you spin a half inch square wood stock threw it with a fast drill gun. Make shr you get strait grain wood for best performance. I am looking to sell my arrow maker becouse I am making arrows in bigger quanitys.In all 4 types.

      I will be back if any want to know more info on how the veritas arrow maker works.

      Jonathan

      I was really interested in making my own shafts with a veritas, but where have you found to be a good source for wood? I’m having a hard time finding straight fur, and I don’t know what Larch and vg bamboo are. Where would I find those? Any info you have would be appreciated.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Find some Surewood shafts. The ones I’ve gotten for the past 2-3 yrs. been good shafts. Rare is it that you’ll find a wood shaft that doesn’t have to have some straightening done to it. That’s part of the fun.

    • Bitter
      Post count: 7

      A reaply back about the wood I use and how get it. I have a big advantage becouse we are in the heart of some of the best old growth timber there can be found. I have cousins that have a family owned saw mill. And they get lots of premium wood in.I dont know how much it would cost to ship you some.

      The vg bamboo I cant tell becouse I am going to try to market that and my supplyer is a little unstable. If you are more interested we can talk more.

    • jreller
      Post count: 1

      I don’t understand. snag32 on 4/23 and marine nelson 4/26 with jwesbrok commentin on nock orientation to arrow grain.

      one says grain should be perpendicular to string and grain, the other says the opposite. or they are saying the same thing with different words,,,or I just don’t understand.

      I run grain perpendicular to bow and allege the nock and cock feather with the grain. ie bow is up and down grain is left/right and tab on nock and cock feather also left/ right. right ?

    • handirifle
      Post count: 409

      jreller wrote: I don’t understand. snag32 on 4/23 and marine nelson 4/26 with jwesbrok commentin on nock orientation to arrow grain.

      one says grain should be perpendicular to string and grain, the other says the opposite. or they are saying the same thing with different words,,,or I just don’t understand.

      I run grain perpendicular to bow and allege the nock and cock feather with the grain. ie bow is up and down grain is left/right and tab on nock and cock feather also left/ right. right ?

      Well crap, wrote a big answer and this thing times me out:x. Yes they are saying the same thing. Align the bowstring and the nock groove perpendicular to the grain of the arrow. I drew a pic to show, hope it helps.

    • pewanogo
      Post count: 35

      Got into building wood arrows myself after reading so much about it in recent articles by G Fred and others. I had great success in the build and the performance as they shot great and were super quiet but……. was shocked to find after all the work (fun) and artistry of dipping, cresting and fletching that my carbons built up over 100grain heavier. All along I figured the woodies would come in heavier but that was not the case. The woodies shoot great, and fun to build but not the weght that I expected.

    • tombow
      Post count: 103

      pewanogo wrote: Got into building wood arrows myself after reading so much about it in recent articles by G Fred and others. I had great success in the build and the performance as they shot great and were super quiet but……. was shocked to find after all the work (fun) and artistry of dipping, cresting and fletching that my carbons built up over 100grain heavier. All along I figured the woodies would come in heavier but that was not the case. The woodies shoot great, and fun to build but not the weght that I expected.

      Can you give us some specs such as: Shaft material, where you got the shafts from, finished arrow length, broadhead weight, which bow(s) you shoot them from, etc,? I’m going to start a new thread so I don’t hijack this one!

      Thanks!

      TomBow

      TomBrissee

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