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    • kiwigrant
      Post count: 3

      Does anybody have any experience about trimming the Cavalier elite tabs. I’m just not sure how short I can go. Too short could get painful real quick, but I do want as little contact/friction as possible. Thanks for any help.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      If I have to trim a tab, I do so just enough to clear my fingertips so I can feel my anchor.

    • Arne Moe
      Member
      Post count: 147

      Really depends on your release and how relaxed your fingers are. Take your tab and hook the string, and pull it back a few inches. Your tab should be about 1/4 to 3/8 inch SHORT of the tips of your fingers.

      If you are getting “finger burn” or have calluses built up then your release technique needs work but that won’t affect the length of the tab.

      Arne

    • David Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2270

      Hi Arne,

      Speaking of finger burn… sometimes I get that, sometimes I don’t. I would agree that it has to do with my release, as it is not constant. Lately, I’m getting it, but usually I don’t and might not for weeks or months at a time.

      I have watched your release video on numerous occasions and found it and the others really helpful. Thanks for posting them. I look forward to more. dwcphoto

    • Arne Moe
      Member
      Post count: 147

      Thanks David. When your fingers start to “burn” it usually is because you are allowing tension back into your hand and wrist and this causes the string to “roll” forward (towards the finger tips) before you release. Try to keep the string in or slightly behind the first joints and keep it there. Then when you relax the fingers, the string simply “pops” the fingers out of the way and — no more “burn.”

      It has been a while since I did a video, if anyone wants something on an area of shooting form, I’m open to suggestions.

      Arne

    • David Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2270

      Thanks, Arne. I do notice that sometimes I let the string move forward out of a good hook. It seems like my bottom finger, right ring finger, holds less and less of the string these days. I suppose I should get back to basics on that.

      As for more videos, I’m not sure, but I’ll be glad to see what you put up.

      thanks, dwc

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Arne,

      I am going to watch your videos this weekend. Sorry to say, I didn’t even know they existed. David, thatks (again) for pointing me to the good stuff. 😀 Arne, I am actually somewhat surprised that you are saying to keep the string in your first joint. I have always been trying to get as close to my fingertips as possible. I am off to the range to give it a try as we speak (type). I am going to be visiting my friend in Florida between Christmas and New Year’s. I am driving down and will take my bow(s). I hope to get some boar hunting in and have a cooler-full on the way home. I am pretty new to traditional archery. I am still learning. I am as good as a person can be with no physical mentorship, but these forums have helped out greatly. Best thing is, I have a blast. As I have said in another threat, I don’t just go to the range, drop a pin on the target and hit the release. Like you said, nothing against compound shooters, I just have a blast sitting with my back to a tree or in a praying position (on both knees) trying to hit a target. I pretend I can actually get within a mile of a deer and try new stuff. I still try to get the fundementals in, but it seems I do more of the fun stuff. If I could trouble you with a question, I think I have carried my grip over from the compound. Is this still an ok grip (I have the riser resting in the web part between my thumb and index finger, the next 2 fingers just touching the grip and the pinky doing a snobish tea-party hang. Is this something to adjust. Anyway, sorry to bend your ear so much. Be well.

      Alex

    • Arne Moe
      Member
      Post count: 147

      Alex,

      It sounds like your grip is OK but would have to see a picture to be sure. If you like it then that is what you should use. I do have some pictures posed on a thread in a different forum but don’t know it that is allowed here. If you’d like to see them, PM me and I’ll tell you how to find them.

      Many self taught trad shooters “think” that you want that string as far out toward the tips of your fingers as possible. On the surface, it would “seem” to make sense. In reality though (very counter intuitive!) getting that string back in the first joints of your fingers actually gives you a stronger hook AND the ability to relax your fingers for a much cleaner release. The string “flips” the fingers out of the way much faster than you can ever just “open” them. It also allows you to have a totally relaxed string wrist and forearm. In order to hold a “finger tip” hook, you have so much tension in your hand that you cannot get a good release. One of the videos, “Release tips” shows this and explains it and it might help you “discover” a cleaner release.

      I’m here to “have my ear bent.” :D:D:D

      Arne

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      Great tips as always Arne. Your advice on keeping the draw hand wrist bent outwards saved me no end of trouble in keeping the arrow tight to the riser. So simple yet so effective. Thanks!

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Arne,

      Thanks for the advice. As I said earlier, I went out to the range and tried to “loosen the shooting fingers”. I am actually having issues with that. I can’t seem to “let go” fast enough. I am not sure how I am doing it, but trying to consiously let my fingers relax winds up with me actually moving my string hand forward as I “let go”. Any suggestions on how to practice this / aquire the skill? I am really trying to get consistancy down, even at 10 yards. I am in an 8″ circle 99%, but I want to tighten it up and get to 8″ (vitals area) at 20 yards. Thanks again for the help. Be well.

      Alex

    • Arne Moe
      Member
      Post count: 147

      Alex, Patience grasshopper!:D

      Getting a relaxed finger release is not a one trip to the range thing. It will take some practice and dedication. Your observation is correct, NO human can physically open their hand fast enough to get out of the way of the string!! That is why good shots allow the string to do the work because it CAN flip the fingers out of the way fast enough IF there is no tension in the fingers. Here are some thoughts to try.

      First, just take your strung bow and sit down in a comfortable chair. Now take a good hook on the string with your fingers and pull the string back a couple inches. Now look at your hand and mentally relax that hand and watch as the string pushes (flips) the fingers out of the way. You will feel kind of a dull thump in your fingers when you do it right and the string will not scrape along your finger tips. And, IF relaxed, the fingers will still be pretty much curled after the string is gone, like they were when you first made the hook.

      Do this frequently over several days!! Get that feel. I demonstrate this in the “release tips” video a little.

      Next, when you go to shoot, remember that feel and the thought of relaxing your fingers. Even do the short draw practice a few times before shooting to refresh your memory. Now, when you get to full draw & anchor, as you start to relax your fingers, you must also expand. Expanding is done by just sticking your chest out a little. This is more of a thought movement than a visible movement. Actually, sticking your chest (upper sternum) out a little causes your string side shoulder to pull back a little.

      Notice the use of the word “little!” This motion is more felt than seen — important not to make it too large!

      This expansion movement is what keeps your hand from moving forward as you relax your fingers. What you will encounter is the combination of two motions. First is the increasing back tension caused by expansion and the second is the relaxing of the fingers/hand. It takes practice to relax one thing (the hand) and increase tension in another (the back). This is not learned in a day. It will take some weeks!!

      It’s hard to explain in the written word and it always seems more complicated than it is when you have to read (or write) it out. Check out the videos again for ideas and suggestions on this stuff, you may find visual information that “clicks” for you after reading this.

      Hang in there it CAN be done; and keep us posted on progress and questions.

      Arne

    • skifrk
      Post count: 387

      Alex, I enjoyed Arnes description of how to practice. One other way i read recently and tried was by G. Fred Asbell in his book “Advanced Instinctive shooting for Bowhunting” in there he described using a one gallon paint can. He describes that if you put the cans thin wire handle on the same joint of the fingers and lift the can where the bottom is about 6″ off of the ground and relax the fingers right, the can should fall back flat to the ground. If the release is wrong the can will then fall on its side, so make sure the can is closed tight. For me that worked well to try, I went with a can that i had left from painting that had only about 1/4 full and it really helped me to get the feeling of a smooth release down.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Thank you all for the advice. Looking forward to giving it a try. Arne, watched several of your videos multiple times. Great teaching aid. Moral of the story is “anything easy usually isn’t worth doing”. I have the perfect bow to practice with and I will try the paint can in between. Thanks again. Happy Holidays to all. Be well.

      Alex

      😀

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