Home Forums Bows and Equipment Tillering Question.

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    • NZLongBowMan
      Member
      Post count: 11

      Hello,

      I’ve predominantly been a longbow man but I recently took the chance to buy one of Ron LaClair’s super shrew recurves (secondhand) so I did.

      The problem is I shoot 3 fingers under but it seems this bow is tillered for split finger. Is there anything I can do to counter or compensate for this? I’d really love to get some arrows tuned for it and actually have it work 🙂

      Thanks!

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      NZ

      You might want to contact http://www.javamanarchery.com/

      Greg probably built the bow. But not sure about that.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      NZLongBowMan wrote: Hello,

      I’ve predominantly been a longbow man but I recently took the chance to buy one of Ron LaClair’s super shrew recurves (secondhand) so I did.

      The problem is I shoot 3 fingers under but it seems this bow is tillered for split finger. Is there anything I can do to counter or compensate for this? I’d really love to get some arrows tuned for it and actually have it work 🙂

      Thanks!

      NZ

      I don’t think you will see any difference in the way the bow shoots using a three finger under release. Some times the bow might be a little noisier than if shot with split finger but most do not see/hear any difference.

      My experience shooting three under did not make any difference in arrow tuning. You might find that your normal knocking point on the string might have to be changed slightly.

      Tillering limbs different is a practice left over from the all wood bow era. Bowyers would make the bottom limb stiffer so as to compensate for the stress put on the bottom limb when drawing. Excess stress on a wood bow limb would distort the limb. This was particularly noticeable on wood bows when un strung or in the relaxed position.

      I know some will disagree with this statement:D but in a fiberglass bow difference in the limb tillering (top vs bottom ) is not necessary. There are some who “manufacturing” bows ignore differential tillering and make there limbs the same.:D

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      vintage archer wrote:

      …I know some will disagree with this statement:D but in a fiberglass bow difference in the limb tillering (top vs bottom ) is not necessary. There are some who “manufacturing” bows ignore differential tillering and make there limbs the same.:D

      As you anticipated someone would do Joe, I respectfully disagree. IMHO it matters not what the bow is made from. What matters is that the bow balances in your hand, and is correctly tillered.

      Take a bow with even length limbs and hold it horizontally from the string or grip. The bottom limb will drag the ground. Measure the string length from limb tip to nock set on the top and bottom side. Does the difference give you pause? It should.

      I am strictly a hobbiest bowyer. For me it is a Budda Exercise (used that phrase twice today 8) ) And I am prone to harsh judgement. But I believe bowyers make limbs the same length because it is easier to tiller and make a good looking bow as it hangs on the wall.

      Tillering a bow with a top limb 2 inches longer than the bottom limb is a greater challenge. But when you get it right, you have a superior bow. A real meat maker.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      Steve Graf wrote: [quote=vintage archer]

      …I know some will disagree with this statement:D but in a fiberglass bow difference in the limb tillering (top vs bottom ) is not necessary. There are some who “manufacturing” bows ignore differential tillering and make there limbs the same.:D

      As you anticipated someone would do Joe, I respectfully disagree. IMHO it matters not what the bow is made from. What matters is that the bow balances in your hand, and is correctly tillered.

      Take a bow with even length limbs and hold it horizontally from the string or grip. The bottom limb will drag the ground. Measure the string length from limb tip to nock set on the top and bottom side. Does the difference give you pause? It should.

      I am strictly a hobbiest bowyer. For me it is a Budda Exercise (used that phrase twice today 8) ) And I am prone to harsh judgement. But I believe bowyers make limbs the same length because it is easier to tiller and make a good looking bow as it hangs on the wall.

      Tillering a bow with a top limb 2 inches longer than the bottom limb is a greater challenge. But when you get it right, you have a superior bow. A real meat maker.

      [b]Steve[/b] No real argument from me. I built all my self bows just as you described. My laminated bow forms are set up the same way.:D

      Balance in hand is important and this can be attained by different limb lengths. As you state most bows are now built with equal length limbs to facilitate the manufacturing process. A lot of the new bows are tillered evenly.

      The point I was making to address the original question is the tillering for split fingers would not make a lot of difference for three fingers under.

      There are very few real custom bows being made any more….Most of the basic designs are set up for CNC. machines or sanding jigs to shape risers and limbs. The string nocks are even cut by machine……I speak from experience when I say bowyers were forced into it in order to make a living. I saw this when I built custom bows commercially. When I switched from custom to making kids bows (BLACK RHINO ) I also switched my method from all hand work to jigs for sanding and shaping etc. I no longer called them custom bows but manufactured bows.:D:

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      Joe, you’re the black rhino guy? Very cool. Now you are the broadhead guy. What were you making before the Rhino bows?

      As for the tillering question, I guess I got lost somewhere. I agree with your observation that it doesn’t much matter between 3 under and split.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      Steve Graf wrote: Joe, you’re the black rhino guy? Very cool. Now you are the broadhead guy. What were you making before the Rhino bows

      STEVE Yes I started the BLACK RHINO bows about 10 years ago ………before that I built custom bows under the name VINTAGE ARCHERY. I offered a recurve and 3 long bow models…I got into kids bows to help offset expenses at shows.It worked out so well I gave up custom bows. I was to slow building bows and maybe to particular to ever make a go at it…..I sold the BLACK RHINO to Chuck and Pat Jones about five years ago. Chuck helped me out when I owned the company and got slammed with demand . He glued up bows with my material and forms.It worked out well as he did that in his own shop…Later I sold out to him.Since Chuck and Pat purchased the company they have added more bow models including a new recurve model just this year .

      Under Chuck and Pat The Black Rhino continues to be one of the premier kid’s bow being offered. They are shipped all over the world. I don’t have any ties to the company other than friendship with Chuck and Pat but still am proud of the company and the concept of making real shootable traditional bows for kids. Bows that they can be proud of.:D

      If you have a passion for archery and have been involved with all the great archery vendors out there it is hard not to want to get involved again. I don’t take any responsibility for starting the broad head business but blame it on Dr Ashby and his writings :D.THE DOC MADE ME DO IT.:D:D That is what I told my wife 😀 Did I mention that I had never met or talked to the good DR.until after the first production run of the TuffHead. I did not need to I had all his teachings memorized.:D

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      Very interesting stuff! And I do agree with you. Kids deserve good bows if we expect them to develop love for archery.

      I hate seeing kids running around with crappy little “bows” that don’t shoot worth a flip. They are so full of enthusiasm that they can make it look fun.

      I bought my kids bows that cost $150 or more each. Little 15# wonder bows. But that was in the days before Rhino Bows. Got them from Martin.

      Hopefully the kids will take these bows with them and give them to their own kids when the day arrives.

      A good bow, whether for kids or adults, will never be wasted.

      Thanks for thinking of the Kids!

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