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    • jpcarlson
      Member
      Post count: 218

      I’ve never shot one, just watched them being used with bows from Asia. Has anyone here ever tried one? seems to be quite simple and seems to release well. Might even cause less torquing of the the arrow at realease? Any thoughts?

      J

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      J,

      From my understanding, these rings are for a specific type of bow (mongolian, horse, etc). They cannot really handle the puondage of long/recurve bows. Also, the shooting style when using a thumb ring has the arrow on the opposite side of the bow from the archer, as opposed to facing the archer like with long/recurve bows (much like a Japanese Yumi). That being said, I don’t actually see why it couldn’t be used. I mean, if you can flip a coin in the air, you can learn how to use this release. Maybe someone out there has already done it. If so, I too would love to hear about it. Be well.

      Alex

      😀

    • jpcarlson
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 218

      From what I have read, many of the old mongolian horse bows, Syrian bows, etc were of quite high poundage. I read many were around 80# draw weight, so it would seem the ring can take what most of us use for hunting weight. I didn’t realize one had to shoot off the opposite side of the bow though, so that would be a problem:)

      J

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      J,

      You could be right. I am not an expert on old Syrian or Mongolian bows (or any for that matter 😆 ). Actually, I had the same question as you, but when I looked up shooting with a thumb ring on YouTube, it was apparent that the arrow was on the “wrong” side, so I never went further. Still, I wonder if it could be done [well]. Check out the video below…

      Be well.

      Alex

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      If a right-handed archer pulls the string with three fingers (split or under) the string torques to his right. If a right-handed archer pulls the string with a thumb (ring or not) the string torques to his left. (Vice versa for southpaws.) Try it, you’ll see. Either style –three fingers or thumb– determines which side of the bow your arrow can be shot from.

      Here is info from a guy who’s found a way to use a thumb ring with a bow designed for a three-finger shooter:

      Archer’s Thumb Ring

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Post count: 104

      jpcarlson wrote: I’ve never shot one, just watched them being used with bows from Asia. Has anyone here ever tried one? seems to be quite simple and seems to release well. Might even cause less torquing of the the arrow at realease? Any thoughts?

      J

      Well I use a thumb ring. With practice I’ve found my arrows far more accurate and faster flight than with fingers. Native Americans have historically used the thumb to shoot with not fingers. This was important with plains Indian flat bows that were very short with a steep angle on the string. (I have a backwards feather glued on my shelf to prevent the arrow from sliding off):wink:

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      Forresterwoods wrote: [quote=jpcarlson]I’ve never shot one, just watched them being used with bows from Asia. Has anyone here ever tried one? seems to be quite simple and seems to release well. Might even cause less torquing of the the arrow at realease? Any thoughts?

      J

      Well I use a thumb ring. With practice I’ve found my arrows far more accurate and faster flight than with fingers. Native Americans have historically used the thumb to shoot with not fingers. This was important with plains Indian flat bows that were very short with a steep angle on the string. (I have a backwards feather glued on my shelf to prevent the arrow from sliding off):wink:

      You should put up a pic of that set up!! Sounds very interesting!! Thanks!!

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