Home Forums Campfire Forum Taking pics after dark

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    • DAbersold
      Post count: 111

      Because bear are most active just before dark, many are recovered after sundown. Mine was last year. When I got my pics downloaded on my computer, I was…let’s just say, less than happy with the way they turned out. Every one had me looking like a mad man with wild eyes. I’m guessing it is just our eyes way of adapting to the dark. Anyway, is there a trick to taking pics after dark to avoid this?

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      I can’t determine the problem exactly from your post, but it sounds as if you’re describing “red eye”–the glare from the retina that occurs when you use flash on a subject whose pupils are naturally dialated because of darkness. If this is the case, check your camera and its manual. Most “point-and-shoot” digital cameras have a “red-eye” function that flashes a low intensity to light before the shutter clicks, to make the subject’s pupils constrict, eliminating the problem. And if the weather is cold enough so that you don’t have to process the quarry completely, you can always take some shots early in the morning, when the natural light is at its best. With good, tight composition, it won’t matter if you field dressed the animal the night before. Don

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      …and if it’s not red-eye that you’re referring to, but instead, just the “harsh” lighting, then the fix is not so easy. Are you using a point and shoot?

      EDIT: I should add that Don’s advice on taking the pics while you can still use natural lighting is best, as long as the cirmumstances allow it. Not that his advise needs my blessing!!! 😆

    • DAbersold
      Post count: 111

      Thanks for the replies guys.
      Don – The archery season for bear in Calif. is in August. I live in northern Calif. and customarily hunt in 80-90 degree weather with a night temp of 60-70. We have to practically start dressing them before they die to prevent spoilage. (OK that’s an exageration, but leaving them over night even gutted is taking a chance.) Or, do you have any tricks to safely leaving a bear over night in those conditions?
      Patrick and Don – The problem isn’t red-eye. I have a digital camera with a red-eye prevention setting. The pics came out with my eyes more wide open as if I had just been frightened or something. I’m guessing it’s just my eyes adjusting to the dark.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      dabersold wrote: Or, do you have any tricks to safely leaving a bear over night in those conditions?

      Yeah, don’t shoot it.:lol:

      Most likely your issue is the harsh, direct lighting from your flash. If you can adjust and/or move the flash, you could use a reflector of some sort and it will diffuse it. There’s lots of things you can do. It just depends how willing you are to take the time and/or money to do it. I’ll go into more detail if your interested. (specifically, when I have a full size keyboard at hand).

    • Chris Shelton
      Post count: 679

      if you post the pictures I can try and fix it up a bit, I have adobe photoshop CS4, which is absolutely amazing, but it isnt a mirracle worker, but I can try?

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