Home Forums Campfire Forum Suggestions: History of Archery Books

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I’m a big time history buff, but I’ve not really delved into the history of archery much. I would like to change that. It would be much appreciated if I could get some recommendations.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Good idea for a thread – I hope to learn about some new titles as well.

      A few off the top of my head that I’ve enjoyed:

      “The Crooked Stick: A History of the Longbow” by Hugh D. Soar

      “Arrows Against Steel” by Vic Hurley

      “American Indian Archery” by Reginald and Gladys Laubin

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      If you want more history than just the evolution of the stick and string, perhaps “Bows of the LI’l Delta” would be of interest in how archery came to be a viable hunting tool on the American Landscape?!

      How nobody wanted bows to be allowed for hunting…till St. Charles and Fred Bear started putting good animals on the ground and showing it was a formidable tool of fair chase harvest!

      Evolution of Pope & Young Club is presented along with all the rocky trails leading to it…

      I read that one over once a year!

    • Charles EkCharles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      Longbow: A Social and Military History” by Robert Hardy (proving that you can’t judge an actor by his stage, TV and film resume):

      “This revised and expanded edition chronicles the history of the longbow from the earliest known example used 8000 years ago, through its coming of age at the battles of Crecy, Poitiers and Agincourt, to its use as a hunting and sporting weapon, and its present-day status in Britain. The book contains the first authoritative account of the archery equipment found in Henry VIII’s warship the Mary Rose; describes the archers themselves, their equipment, training, uniform and terms of service; examines the fact and fiction of the Robin Hood legend, the reasons why the French never took to the weapon and the devastating effect of longbow against longbow in the Wars of the Roses; offers a detailed account of how to make a longbow from scratch, including all the tools and materials required. By the author of “The Great War Bow”.”

      The Great Warbow: From Hastings to the Mary Rose

      by Matthew Strickland and Robert Hardy

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      I know everyone has read it but Hunting With The Bow And Arrow by Pope is in my reckoning unmatched in setting the scene for modern bowhunting.

      In terms of broader history I haven’t read or heard of anything coming close to a comprehensive history, covering African, European, Asian and American archery, from prehistory through to today.

      I’m eager to see what else is recommended though.. great thread topic!

    • Patrick
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Have any of you read, “The History of Archery” by Edmund Burke? Steve Turay quotes the book on his website.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Patrick wrote: Have any of you read, “The History of Archery” by Edmund Burke? Steve Turay quotes the book on his website.

      No, but I’d like to – it looks interesting.

      I’ve looked high and low for archery history books that are about more than just the “English” longbow, and there is so little out there, other than some dry, academic texts (“Arrows Against Steel” is so far the best, non-Anglo-centric book on the subject I’ve seen).

      It would be great to see a book that takes a comprehensive, global approach!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514
    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Smithhammer wrote: Here’s another resource:

      http://www.archerylibrary.com/index.html

      That site is down right now. I was going to post it the other day and just now checked it again.

      Darn because it has some neat old stuff on it.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Here’s something of interest.

      http://www.archeryhalloffame.com/inductee.html

    • snikkerbua
      Post count: 8

      Hallo.

      Two books I have learnd a lot from is:

      The bow builder`s book

      european bow building from the stone age to today

      ISBN: 978-0-7643-4153-3

      Traditional bowyer, more unnecessary fun

      By Jack B. Harrison

      ISBN: 0-97266393-0-6

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Patrick,

      I like to surf Ebay for old archery books. You can usually find various ones for a few dollars. They’re fun to read, and after a while you realize how little has changed over the past hundred years or so.

    • Charles EkCharles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      snikkerbua wrote: Hallo.

      Two books I have learnd a lot from is:

      The bow builder`s book

      european bow building from the stone age to today

      ISBN: 978-0-7643-4153-3

      Traditional bowyer, more unnecessary fun

      By Jack B. Harrison

      ISBN: 0-97266393-0-6

      The first one is at my elbow right now, waiting for me to make up my mind which ancient Danish design to use for a selfbow project. (The wood I will use has benefited from my procrastination, even as the project has not …) It’s a great resource on the history of European bows and I strongly second its nomination here.

      (Til snikkerbua – Velkommen! Bare send meg privat beskjed dersom du vil snakkes om buer og jakt osv. Jeg er oversetter av de skandinaviske språk til engelsk.)

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I’d love to find a good, objective account of the 100 Years’ War, if anyone has a recommendation.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Doc Nock wrote: If you want more history than just the evolution of the stick and string, perhaps “Bows of the LI’l Delta” would be of interest in how archery came to be a viable hunting tool on the American Landscape?!

      How nobody wanted bows to be allowed for hunting…till St. Charles and Fred Bear started putting good animals on the ground and showing it was a formidable tool of fair chase harvest!

      Evolution of Pope & Young Club is presented along with all the rocky trails leading to it…

      I read that one over once a year!

      I never forgot this suggestion, and just this last Saturday, I picked up one of two copies sitting on the book shelf at Jay’s Sporting Goods I had been eye balling every time I’d stop by. I absolutely love it…great book!

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      I have a copy autographed by Glen. Met him at trade shows a few times.

      Read the book many years ago while I still had my head to the grindstone. I should probably read it again now that I have time to appreciate the words.

      Just had a friend and teacher pass away. He was my age when we met 30 years ago, and now he is gone… Time, where does it go so fast and why is it in such a F$%^ing hurry?

      Take time to read great stories, and to make great stories with your friends and your family!

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Difficult to find a single objective account of the 100 years war,there is a lady who’s name escapes me has written some good books I will look into it and let you know .

      Mark

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Agincourt: The King, the Campaign, the Battle Paperback

      by Juliet Barker

      I recomend this, well researched and well written.

      The Time Traveller’s Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century

      By Ian Mortimer

      This is a bit early but gives a good insight to the life of my ancestors, its a wonder any of us survived.

      Most of the accounts of the 100 years war were written by Heralds or scribes employed by nobles so may be a bit bias, or totally inaccurate. Those written by the church are a little better but you need to be more dedicated than me to read them.

      Unfortunately there is little recorded about the common man that was often ‘volunteered’ to go to France.

      Mark.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Mark

      Great reads and reference. I have to admit that I was a bit confused by Bruce’s question–which 100 years war–15th,16th,–19th or the one we just finished 20th century–well, at least we are only into the 15th year of the next 100years war:evil: Any hope that we might eventually learn a darn thing?

      Sorry mom–shot the bow today:D

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Hi Mike, a bit early to write the history of the current 100 years war, although it would be nice to think that the introduction might be written by somebody that was there.

      The lessons have been leant time and again by the common man.

      Mark.

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.