Home Forums Bows and Equipment string silencer placement

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • mojohand
      Post count: 16

      How does one determine the best placement for string silencers? Other than trial and error. I would think there has to be some science behind it, such that the silencer is positioned just so to coincide with a certain phase of the wave created by the vibrating string. But how do you all determine this. I searched the site and could find no answer. Does it even matter? I am getting a new(to me) Bear Kodiak Magnum and will be putting some fur silencers on it. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

    • MCuiksa
      Post count: 51

      Mojo,

      I believe the recommended starting point for silencers is 1/4 of the way in from each end. You can tweak from there although I think most would agree that brace height is more critical than silencer placement to eliminate noise/shock. Also, heavy arrows help. Mike.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Mojo — Unlike Mike, I have always heard to position silencers at 1/3 in from the string ends. There’s always more than one way to skin a cat (so long as your knife is sharp.) But just like Mike, I agree that brace height (and arrow weight) have more to do with release noise than do silencers. If I have my Shrew longbow braced right and am shooting elk-weight arrows and have the bow quiver strapped on, I don’t even need string silencers because there is no vibration, no sound at all. Same is largely true with the wood longbows I’ve made. However, I’ve not been able to do that with my own Bear KMag, which, being a radical recurve, is literally a lot more “high strung.”

      On a side note, fyi, I’m now shooting SBD Fast Flight string on my KMag (and all my other bows). It makes a definite difference in speed, has done no damage to the limb tips or laminations after a lot of shooting (I had SBD wrap the string ends for padding), and no increase in release noise. One of these days I’ll give the Shrew a break and go kill an elk with the little green beauty (born in 1968). Dave

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      I like to use 4 silencers instead of two…

      Whether you use 2 or 4 silencers, the best place to put them is where they look the best. Not too close to the limbs, not too close to the center. String the bow up, take a look at it’s profile. Then use a sharpy to mark the string where you want the silencers to go. Use a ruler to get them even as measured from the limb tips.

      Using 4 silencers, 2 on each end spaced about 3 inches apart serves to disrupt the harmonics in the string more effectively than a single set can.

      The other tidbit I would give you is to tune your arrows after you attach string silencers. It likely will affect the arrow flight/spine.

      Have fun!

    • RI Swamp Yankee
      Member
      Post count: 20

      The science suggests the harmonic nodes on a bowstring would be highest (most noise) at the 1/3 and 1/4 points; thus you hear a lot of suggestions to use either/or both of those points. I’d suggest that’s a good place to start, but there is no escaping the fact that you need to invest the time and effort to fine tune from those starting point locations. Nocking points, finger placement, serving size, yarn wraps etc all contribute to changing the location of those harmonic nodes. Just like with an arrow spine calculator, the science is a great place to start, but archery is more art than science in my opinion and the user needs to get involved (do the work).

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Dave – interesting to hear that you’ve been using a SBD on your vintage K-Mag with no problems. I’m definitely considering the same for mine, and I’ve been really happy with SBDs on my longbows.

      And this is probably obvious, but I only consider adding string silencers after I’ve done everything else to properly tune and quiet the bow, and if it is still needed at that point.

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.