Home Forums Bows and Equipment String silencer placement

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    • Forresterwoods
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      Post count: 104

      In reading a book about native american bows and arrows, I noticed their string silencers are about an inch from each end of the string. After seeing that I wondered why most folks including me put them about a foot or farther from the string ends? Many times you can hear the ‘woosh’ of silencers moving through the air and I wonder if that doesn’t slow down the string? Also if the silencers are on to absorb the string vibration, does not the entire string vibrate so why not place the silencers on the ends like traditional archers with centuries of experience…native americans?

      Kevin

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      From a post on a previous thread, by RI Swamp Yankee:

      “The science suggests the harmonic nodes on a bowstring would be highest (most noise) at the 1/3 and 1/4 points; thus you hear a lot of suggestions to use either/or both of those points. I’d suggest that’s a good place to start, but there is no escaping the fact that you need to invest the time and effort to fine tune from those starting point locations. Nocking points, finger placement, serving size, yarn wraps etc all contribute to changing the location of those harmonic nodes. Just like with an arrow spine calculator, the science is a great place to start, but archery is more art than science in my opinion and the user needs to get involved (do the work).”

      My bowyer, Gregg Coffey, started placing very small wool silencers in these locations and it worked so well across a variety of bow designs that I tried it and now it’s my standard. But experimentation in all aspect of tuning and archery is fun, and like RI suggests, start there and then experiment. Except for some poorly designed bows and/or shooting arrows too light, you can tune an easy majority of string twang out without silencers. I find a strap-on bow quiver also helps.

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 104

      The current issue I see is not with string vibration noise due to my silencers but with arrow speed with silencers on closer to nock point. As not all silencers are the same, I’ll keep moving mine further from center as possible. As long as my string is quiet, the further from center the better as I see it. Guess I’m a little old fashion and like having tufts of beaver fur on my string. (Should have kept that last mole I got from the yard)…haha

      Kevin

    • coastalbendbows
      Post count: 120

      I understand the concept of heterodining and the off placement of silencers and it does work and works really well with all my builds that I send out. I set all mine up this same way 1/3&1/4 and with a SBD string.

      David I’d like to see a pic of these wood silencers if ya don’t mind.

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 104

      HETERODINING? Would that be like taking a lady out for dinner? ❓

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      coastalbendbows wrote: …David I’d like to see a pic of these wood silencers if ya don’t mind.

      Me too!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I’ve used otter or beaver fur strips for years, but recently put some mini-woolies on my new Kanati. One thing I really like about these is that after you place them in between the string strands and tie them down, they are very secure and won’t move around while shooting, but you can still slide them up and down a bit for fine tuning. Not as easy to do with fur strips, which need to be removed completely and then re-installed.

      As a side note, I much prefer the size of “mini” Wooly Whispers, but the only place I can find them is through Kustom King. Not sure why. I like them a lot more than the standard Woolies, which are usually way too big for my needs.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Ah yes, fellers, I’m still to learn to re-read my posts before dumping them on the world. Of course “wood” was a typo. What I really meant say was “elk ears.” I find that a complete elk ear on each end of the string takes 100% of the noise out. 😛

      As I was just reminded by Smithy’s thread in this forum, the little squares of felted wool that Java Man uses and which work so well for me are made by Two Track. It’s a company that makes felted wool clothing and is usually at Kzoo. Expensive but minimal size, very effective and so far indestructible. I use them on my Osage longbow as well as my Java Man.

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 104

      I was sceptical when you said wood. Elk ears sound better..no pun intended. How long are the hairs? I caught a mole in my yard last year but the wife made me toss it. I skinned it and the fur was the softest and thickest ever felt with very thin hide. I’ll keep it out of the fridge next time.:D

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
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      Post count: 104

      Dave..did you say a complete elk ear? One could almost make a wallet from that. Has your message been lost in translation? Happens to me a lot when trying to clearify.

      Kevin

    • coastalbendbows
      Post count: 120

      forresterwoods wrote: HETERODINING? Would that be like taking a lady out for dinner? ❓

      sorry should be heterodyning

    • coastalbendbows
      Post count: 120

      Chuck over @ two tracks has a god thing going. I havent used them but have heard(or not heard) them in action. and from what all i have read they will outlast several strings.

      Shawn

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Kevin, it’s not my “message” that got lost in translation, but rather my inept attempt at humor. 😕

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 104

      I hear ya Dave. I do the same but due to my lack of ellequence I tend to sound rude or sarcastic. What a challenge it must be putting your thoughts and intentions on print. Humor is especially difficult to convey due to cultural differences and personal experiences of the listeners. It seems like when in doubt grace should be the great equalizer.

      Kevin

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