Home Forums Campfire Forum Scentless waterproof spray?

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    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Have any of you guys tried this stuff? I was at a local sporting goods store today for a new pair of hiking boots when I saw it, in an orange bottle. Didn’t get the name but it’s not one of the usual suspects for hunting-related chemicals. In fact, while it could be useful to hunters if it works, it makes no pretense of eliminating or containing odors, or thus of improving your hunting odds, but only to be a scentless waterproofer for packs, boots, etc. — stuff we carry on the hunt. But I’m not about to sink almost $20 into finding out. If and when someone here tries it in the field, please let us know if it (a) is an effective waterproofer, (b) is in fact scentless to your nose, wet and dry, (c) how long it lasts without wearing off, and (d) any other worthwhile observations. Next time I’m there I’ll get the name and see what the website has to say. Bottom line I don’t know if I can bring myself to spend $20 for a small bottle of anything except really good whiskey or cognac. Thanks, dave

    • Raymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1072

      Dave –
      Not sure about the orange bottle scentless Waterproofing. If I find some I will check it out.
      I heartily agree with the “good whiskey” comment [ For medicinal purposes only of course]. However I thought cognac was for mid – afternoon girl watching from a sidewalk cafe on the “Champs Elysees” in Paris ?!?
      Scout

    • David Petersen
      Member
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      Post count: 2749

      Scout — Indeed, cognac would work well for that purpose, a veritable moveable feast of lovely womens. But that’s a long flight, a longer swim,and I don’t eat snails. So I’m happy to do my girl watching (these “mature” days) across the campfire or living room at my lovely wife. 😀 It’s been raining daily here, so staying dry in the coming hunting seasons is much on my mind. I’ve also been renewing the seam sealer on my tents and the MT Pitch Blend on the leather uppers of my LL Beaner hunting shoes, as well as the leather hood of my bow quiver. When the inner fire is burning, energy runs high and it’s all good fun. Even without the cognac. This is, after all, still the margarita and beer time of year. For those who drink. 🙄

    • Raymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1072

      Dave–
      I only mentioned the Paris remark, because an old friend [ avowed cognac connoissuer ] said it could only be used in specialized and proper applications. one of which was my comment. I can verify it is very apropos in that scenario -haha. Roger the Margarita/beer time of year. I always prefer fine bourbon for the backpack application.
      I too am preparing for the fall – is the orange stuff a liquid,gel, paste?
      Scout.

    • FUBAR
      Member
      Post count: 252

      Can’t say I have seen this stuff. I use Camp-dri and after leaving it outside to dry a few days, don’t notice an odor

    • Backcountry Joe
      Post count: 39

      I’d be willing to pick some up and try it out if you can give me more info.

    • Amoose
      Post count: 80

      FUBAR wrote: Can’t say I have seen this stuff. I use Camp-dri and after leaving it outside to dry a few days, don’t notice an odor

      I use this also, and here in Washington we get a little wet.

      I spray with a lot of light coats, let dry thoroughly and hang outside to dry.Keep doing it until water beads off.

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      Fuggetaboutit! If an elk can smell your waterproofing, it can smell you. Don

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A $20 bottle of whiskey is probably just as effective at keeping you comfortable when it’s raining.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Don — You are right considering scent in the breeze. I am referring to residual scent left as we walk along, and I know absolutely I can control it with rubber boots and elk pee, and that the waterproofing spray I once used on leather/nylon boots almost turned a herd of elk inside out in panic when they crossed the point in the game trail where I crossed half an hour before. It’s residual scent I’m concerned with here.

      Bruce — a $20 bottle of whisky? Either you drink cheap rotgut or it’s a mightly small bottle. Cool

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      David Petersen wrote:

      Bruce — a $20 bottle of whisky? Either you drink cheap rotgut or it’s a mightly small bottle. Cool

      Ha. Wink Have you tried Buffalo Trace? If not I’d highly recommend it – surprisingly good $20 hooch. But given my druthers (and a little extra cash in the wallet), I’d opt for Blantons or Woodford….

    • George D. Stout
      Post count: 256

      You need to quit going to places like Cabelas. Only bad things can happen there; go down to the local hardware store and get a can of Snowproof. Rub it in good, and let the boots on the porch for a day or two. I don’t know what it smells like, but it’s not strong and it sure doesn’t smell like humans. You probably need to be more concerned with internal exhaust.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      donthomas wrote: Fuggetaboutit! If an elk can smell your waterproofing, it can smell you. Don

      Exactly!

    • rnorris
      Post count: 88

      I like Montana Pitch Blend, seems to me pine pitch and beeswax are pretty natural smells.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Montana Pitch is all I use on all my leather – quivers, sheaths, boots, whatever.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      So there are some advantages to living the wrong side of the pond, we can visit Cognac and the Loire for a long weekend, he said smugly, although I pay a whole lot more for Buffalo Trace.

      As for scent proofing about halfway down the bottle and it no longer seems to matter.:P

      I’m still using neatsfoot oil and dubbin cant say it does anything for scent but keeps my boots supple and my feet dry.

      Mark.

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Snow Seal beeswax dressing has been a long standing staple in my boot care kit. More recently I’ve used Obenaufs and I have used Knikwax on hiking boots.

      Snow Seal is virtually scentless. The leather must be dry when applied and it should be heated so it will melt and soak into the leather. Used liberally it is fairly waterproof and works better in snow than slogging in muddy boggy places. If you are going there you need rubber boots.
      Will need to re-apply. The last 7 oz jar lasted me 15+ years.

      Obenaufs is a liquid concoction that soaks into the leather on its own though I suspect application of heat would hasten that process. Water proof in most conditions but has a long lasting petroleum odor

      Knikwax is a wax/silicone solution. It is recommended to wet the leather before application, then allow to completely air dry. This also is a very good waterproofer but it also has an odor not unlike rotting gasoline, so on hiking boots its OK, on my hunting boots, no. The odor will wear off eventually, you could apply it well ahead of the season and air them out and you should be OK. I typically only apply it once a year anyway.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Well, somehow we drifted into leather treatments, when I originally asked about spray waterproofing for fabric parts of boots. But in review I didn’t make that clear. For leather I long ago landed on Montana Pitch Blend and nothing else in a long lifetime of wet feet comes close. And its pleasant scent doesn’t spook animals. Ingredients include mink oil, beeswax, and pine pitch. It’s getting more popular and easier to find all the time, in shoe stores and online from most trad archery suppliers, Sierra TP, etc.

      Thanks for all the good ideas, fellers. Especially regarding good booze. We quit drinking at home nearly a year ago, so now when I do drink it’s more fun than ever and won’t kill me quite as fast.

      Happy Thanksgiving to all, Dave

    • rnorris
      Post count: 88

      I missed the fabric part of your question….sorry. I gave up on boots with fabric being water proof long ago. I do have one pair I wear for turkeys, but all of my boots are now leather or leather/rubber.

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Guess I homed in on the word boot in your post and ignored the word spray 😳
      I have not used the spray. Like you I would not spend the 20.00 bucks to find out.

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