Home Forums Bows and Equipment Pulling my hair out over quivers.

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    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      Back in my compound days I settled on a Kwikee Kwiver attached to the bow (I also carried a large backpack). When I transitioned to recurves I found that I really did not like the quiver to be on the bow and ended up putting a Kwikee Kwiver bracket on the strap of my homemade and large possibles type bag (gave up on carrying so much ‘junk’ into the woods!) so that the nocks pointed upwards and the quiver was basically on my back. Now I’m shooting longbows and have sold all my recurves except for one and it’s for sale as well. Will be hunting with longbows from now on. I will be taking less ‘junk’ into the woods and will be changing possibles bags to a much smaller one if I even carry one at all. So I’m looking at quivers again. Don’t want a quiver on the bow. Don’t want a ‘modern’ plastic Kwikee type quiver either. Not sold on the back quiver idea yet although I saw one that might be perfect in a 2001 article by Scott Toll in the now defunct Instictive Archer mag. No plans were listed for the quivers and the details in the article were sketchy. Not sure how well a plains type would work. I hunt from the ground 50% of the time AND carry in a Lone Wolf climber the other 50% so whatever quiver I end up with needs to work well with that. I have found that in the past I had to leave the possibles bag at home and carry by hand a 3 arrow Kwikee Kwiver when I carried my treestand. Cumbersome to say the least! Need some ideas here!

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      I’m also one who dislikes bow quiver… stick bows have such fine balance, it just feels sinful to load it up lopsided with a bow quiver… but that’s me.

      I also dislike back quivers. Only because reaching up over my head to get or put back an arrow seems like waving flags in the woods, and putting them back, too old and stiff in the torso to do that gymnastic move.

      I opted for a modified back quiver that allows me to reach around at the waist, grab an arrow, slide it out with a minimum of motion and ease the whole quiver around to put it back. I can slide it under my arm in thick brush and avoid it catching when I stoop to go under brush/limbs. It is an open design so the shaft of the arrow is accessible without reaching over my head or dropping a BH arrow onto my calf! 😯

      I put a fletch cover over the the top to keep out rain and such.

      I find it a best of 2 worlds for me personally. I have this larger one and then one that is a bit smaller… that holds only 4 arrows, which easily slips down alongside my strap on tree stand and still is accessible.

    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      Correct me if I’m wrong but it looks like you are using a Cat Quiver/St. charles type of quiver? Maybe I could strap that onto the climber stand when I take it?? I tend to shoot arrows that are different lengths. Is your design adjustable for this or are you stuck with one length of arrow?

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I mostly shoot my longbows anymore, and I agree – it’s really nice to not have a bow quiver on them. Plus, there are lots of times when I want more than 4 arrows with me, and the last thing I want to do is put a larger bow quiver on my longbow.

      I also have the same opinion as Doc when it comes to back quivers – they’re fine for stumping, but I don’t like them for hunting, because of the movement involved in getting an arrow and because they don’t allow me to wear a backpack.

      So, I’ve pretty much come to the same conclusion as Doc – a side quiver that allows for a low-key, stealthy movement to remove an arrow, and that doesn’t interfere (too much) with a backpack. I really like the Safari Tuff ‘Duiker Deluxe’:

      The ‘deluxe’ version will carry half a dozen arrows, comes with a removable storm hood, and it has a side pocket (like their larger ‘Arrowmaster’ model) which I really like for keeping my armguard, glove, stringer, etc. all together. The quiver is rigid enough that you can strap it to the side of a backpack and not crush your arrows. And the fabric that it’s covered in is really quiet. So far it’s about the best solution I’ve found.

    • Cameron UnruhCameron Unruh
      Member
      Post count: 240

      I am a “build it if I can” type of guy so I tanned a blacktail dear hide with the hair on and made a side quiver that fits my style. The cut in the front hangs down on my right side and I can slip and arrow out with little movement. The quiver can slide around to travel on my back or alongside my pack. If I was to purchase a quiver I would go with Safari Tuff…

    • skinner biscuitskinner biscuit
      Member
      Post count: 250

      Here’s one I made using a Selway slide on quiver.I put rifle sling post on mine, so I can put on whatever sling I want.It helps in adjusting by turning the post as well.I only use this once a year when I go to a 3d broadhead shoot in Brownsville.I prefer the bow quiver when hunting. I keep a velcro strap on the hood so I can stick a fir bough in it.I believe it really helps break up my outline and conceals my draw. For practice a back quiver.

      attached fileattached file
    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Post count: 573

      Smithhammer- on the Duiker, do you tuffheads stick out of the foam with their sharp edges showing? I read the foam is only 1.5″ deep. The side quiver I have only has 2″ of foam. I enjoy using a bow quiver because it is one less thing on my back and I have more control of the arrows when crawling through brush. But I bought a side quiver for the rain cause I don’t like my broadheads getting wet; however, I haven’t used it and can’t speak to its efficacy.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Ptaylor wrote: Smithhammer- on the Duiker, do you tuffheads stick out of the foam with their sharp edges showing? I read the foam is only 1.5″ deep. The side quiver I have only has 2″ of foam. I enjoy using a bow quiver because it is one less thing on my back and I have more control of the arrows when crawling through brush. But I bought a side quiver for the rain cause I don’t like my broadheads getting wet; however, I haven’t used it and can’t speak to its efficacy.

      While the longer broadheads (Tuffheads, Steel Force Traditionals) don’t go entirely into the foam, the bottom of the quiver still covers them from being exposed, if that makes sense.

      And I hear you on the up-sides of a bow quiver – sometimes in thick brush, anything other than a bow quiver can be an annoyance. But the weather/shrubbery/etc. protection that something like the Duiker offers, combined with an unencumbered bow, having my leaning more and more in that direction these days. I have yet to find any arrow carrying solution that isn’t a compromise. If only I had silent, scentless, perfectly camoflaged servant who could hand me an arrow when needed….:lol:

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Here is a past thread with a home made side quiver I made if you are interested in making your own creation

      https://www.tradbow.com/members/cfmbb/messages.cfm?threadid=E39542A5-1422-1DE9-ED7512F725A286CC

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Couple more old threads on home made quivers I made. There is pic in one of the pattern with measurements if you want to make your own. This one of my favorites at is can be worn on the side or around back.

      https://www.tradbow.com/members/cfmbb/messages.cfm?messageid=E526DE05-1422-1DE9-ED5E3BA36B1FD9A3#E526DE05-1422-1DE9-ED5E3BA36B1FD9A3

      https://www.tradbow.com/members/cfmbb/messages.cfm?messageid=945F14DF-1422-1DE9-ED3C867C2112AA47#945F14DF-1422-1DE9-ED3C867C2112AA47

      BTW search the word quiver and there are tons of threads to look through on quivers.

    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      Duncan- I’ve seen a lot of guys on the ‘net use those type of side quivers. I’ve always been curious though, what keeps the shafts from making noise? With a soft leather back quiver the ‘tube’ of the quiver flattens out to the contours of your back and compresses against the shafts to kee ’em quiet. With the plains quiver it’s sort of the same concept, leather is snug around the shafts. But with the hard leather tube type side quivers the shafts just sort of lay in there. I understand that most have foam in the bottom to stick the point into but what keeps the nock end from moving around and making racket? Not a critisism, but an honest question.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      James G

      Lots of great advice here–but my 2cents.

      I shoot a long bow (shrew classic hunter) and I used a bow quiver—never liked the feel. So got the back quiver from 3 rivers their cheapest one think it’s called the trad or something. Leather shields on the tuffheads and no problems in the bottom. As for nock end moving around:D man that is movement on your part. Like shooting the bow, stalking the prey, moving with your gear—silently– takes practice. Is it more difficult? But that’s what we do, and hanging a bow quiver on your Coffey original to me is just –not good. In my humble opinion8).

      Good luck with your choice.

      Mike

    • WyoStillhunter
      Post count: 87

      I have not used the plains type quiver myself. But I do enjoy, and often learn from, the YouTube videos of Greyarcher1. Grey does not hunt but he is way, way into traditional archery and makes much of his own gear. Recently I have only seen him using a plains quiver. Check out his videos and see how it works for him.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      JamesG:

      I use this little guy to hold arrows when quiet is needed. The leather is pliable enough that it silently releases when the fletch end pulls through

      Honestly when small game hunting I don’t worry about it.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      I also put a plug of closed cell foam in the bottom and if you are concerned a broadhead might push through you can put a hard plastic protector between the foam and the leather end cap.

    • Cameron UnruhCameron Unruh
      Member
      Post count: 240

      Regarding the noise of a side quiver…I put a stuffed wool sock which is tied off to a leather strand in the top opening of my quiver. This stops all arrow movement but still allows you to pull out an arrow. My quiver is a bit larger than the small leather tube versions so I am not sure the same thing would work well with other styles.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Oh yeah, there are a variety of ways to hold the arrows in place. Cameron mentions the wool sock, good idea too, you could line the upper end with shearling, native Americans stuffed dry grass in theirs.

      Something I’ve been thinking about would be to borrow from the wheelie technology a little and take a “whisker biscuit” and somehow fit it in the top of the quiver. This could work on the smaller tube sizes but might not with the larger tube quivers. Just tossing around some ideas for those of us who like creating our own gear. 😀

    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      Duncan that little leather disk to hold the shafts is a wonderfull idea! Thanks for the ideas and help! Time to head to the workshop.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      It sounds to me like you are moving toward the basic setup. There’s a lot of spirit in a bare bow and a back quiver. I used a bare bones basic back quiver this past year and took it into the tree with me. I just found a branch, or put a hook up to hold it. I tried wearing it in the stand, but the feathers rub on the tree too much.

      It takes some practice to learn to use a back quiver well and to be able to walk through the woods with it. But it’s just more of the same. If you are shooting a longbow, you know what I mean.

      The only issue I haven’t resolved with the back quiver yet is what to do on longer hunts where a back pack is required. I didn’t do any of that sort of hunting this past season. But I am sure I will some time in the next season or two.

      For here in NC, a possibles bag and back quiver handle it all.

      Maybe next time I am out west I just get me one of them there man servants to carry all my gear 😯

    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      HAHAHA……man servants. Yeah that’s what’s needed……:lol:

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Steve Graf wrote:

      The only issue I haven’t resolved with the back quiver yet is what to do on longer hunts where a back pack is required. I didn’t do any of that sort of hunting this past season. But I am sure I will some time in the next season or two.

      This has always been my question for folks who are big fans of back quivers for hunting – how do you carry the rest of your stuff? Or are you just not carrying much else?

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      James, there are a lot of great ideas above and from some very experienced heads. Of all the side quivers I have seen (though never used) the Asbell looks like a reasonably priced ($70?), utilitarian option. Nothing fancy, but functional, versatile and robust in design. Perhaps worth your consideration.

      Jim

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      I’ve never done a backpack hunt though I do love hearing about others that do have those kinds of hunts. As an outsider looking in it seems a type of catquiver or St Charles style attached to the most convenient side of the backpack would be a solution. Then, once set up in camp you just wear the quiver with what ever day pack you use for forays around camp. Extra arrows could be kept in a tube on the larger pack?

    • JamesG
      Post count: 32

      I will be making a version of the side quiver Duncan made.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      I will say that when I do use a bow quiver, Eagle’s Flight are the lightest, least obtrusive bow quivers I’ve ever used. Even on a light longbow, I don’t feel that they affect the balance negatively at all.

    • Greg RaganGreg Ragan
      Member
      Post count: 201

      Get a Hill stye backquiver and learn to use it and break it in properly. There is nothing better to hunt with than this style. HH had it right and was a pretty good hunter.

      Don’t skimp on a “Cheap one”…. get one from a manufacturer that knows how to build a proper Hill style. HHA still sells them as do others like SunsetHill (Nate Steen).

      The design and heavy leather that is conditioned to form to your back keeps your arrows from making noise or rattling around together. I can bend over and touch my toes with the quiver almost completely upside down without arrows from falling out.

      I have a “how too” in the works for using and conditioning a new quiver for publication and after it is out there I’ll post a link…..but look into it. Besides, there is nothing more classic looking or faster on the shot than a Hill Style.

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