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    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      This is bouncing off an old thread I found called How Well Do You Shoot?.

      This time of year the days get shorter and kids are in school so I find myself practicing early on my little range when it’s still dark and stumping on the weekends when the rest of the house is still asleep.

      I like shooting in the dark or near dark. When i can only see the shape of the bag and no detail to aim at I can really concentrate on form. Funny thing is a lot of the time I end up with pretty decent groups despite my lack of aiming. Perhaps I’m aiming more than I think I am.

      In any case I’m really trying to follow the direction given in Core Archery about really putting my back into play. I know it helps and practice is the way to make it second nature.

      You guys have any particular ways you practice that helps? Best, dwc

    • Alexandre Bugnon
      Member
      Post count: 681

      I start practice by shooting 5 arrows eyes closed, in the ground or whatever backstop 3ft from me. That lets me concentrate on my anchor, which is #1 culprit when I shoot bad. I finish practice with the same.

    • skinner biscuitskinner biscuit
      Member
      Post count: 250

      First off I think it’s important to have your target at the height of the animal your going to hunt.I use a reinhardt block target set up for elk vitals,because that’s what I bowhunt.I go to my backyard range and stand at 20 yards(max hunting range)and jog in place to get the heartrate up.I visualize a elk standing there,carefully draw and shoot.If I am consistently in the pie plate day in and out I’m good to go.If not, I have no business hunting.I follow this by shooting from 10 to 40 yards in 5 yard increments (one arrow at a time)crouching,standing,hunkered down,sometimes even sitting on a stool.I follow this by shooting uphill at another target and downhill at another target as well.(All at different distances).Throw in some stump shooting(I love to wallop a stump thorough tree boughs and dense brush with high foc arrows)How fun!…. All and all though,it’s the coldshot that matters most!

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    • Cladinator
      Post count: 25

      Honestly, just getting out and finding time to practice even a little would be an improvement.

      At this rate, I’ll have no business hunting until late October, early November. I won’t even bother trying to harvest a white-tail until I’m confident about my shots.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2359

      This is a good topic. If only there was a tried and true method of practice which would guarantee good shooting 👿

      I don’t really have a method, but I have a few guidelines:

      – Only bring one arrow to the range. Shoot, retrieve, shoot. this keeps me focused on every shot, and keeps me from ingraining bad shots and speed shooting.

      – Practice for no more than 45 minutes. This keeps me from getting fatigued and sloppy.

      – During hunting season, make the first shot a hunting shot. This gives me a measure of my cold shot. If it’s good, I call the practice session good no matter what happens next.

      I look forward to learning a few good tips from this thread…

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Steve, the last couple times I shot I took only one arrow. I do think it helps concentrate on form. Makes my groups a lot tighter, too. Dwc

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2359

      Not only are your groups tighter, but you get your daily walk in too 8)

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