Home Forums Campfire Forum Orion Rising!!

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    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
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      Post count: 1384

      Who has noticed Orion rising above the horizon in the early time between the dark and the light?

      Have you ever watched the rising planets and suddenly seen how they align with Earth? Did you began to feel a sense of where you are with your feet on the ground, on a planet, in the universe? It can be fleeting, but it is most apparent to me when more than one planet is visible and the other stars are beginning to fade in the early light.

      Rising early to go scouting or hunting affords us one more delightful connection with our world that many go their entire lives and never see or feel.

      So rise up like Orion and draw back your bows. May you always know where you are.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      Part of my ritual when heading out in the morning to hunt is to find Orion in the sky. It is always in the sky early morning during hunting season. It’s like how the call of the crow changes when hunting season comes…

      I like that thought: Put your feet on the ground and know where you are in the universe…

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Duncan,

      I like it. Orion is a great symbol for me, as well. Autumn, hunting season, cool weather. It’s all good. Knowing your place is also valuable. Insignificant in ways, but important in many others. All good. peace, dwc

    • garydavis
      Post count: 101

      When I lived in cities I never looked up. Now that I’ve been living in the woods for a good while I always look for Orion when it’s clear. I’ve never tried to articulate the the sensation or the fleeting thoughts provoked. A sense of place… an anchoring is a big part of it though

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Duncan wrote:

      So rise up like Orion and draw back your bows. May you always know where you are.

      Great post, Duncan! I thought I might be the only one who gets ‘distracted’ by such things…

    • bruc
      Member
      Post count: 476

      Going to start looking. It is a small group seen in the pre-dawn ?

      Thanks Duncan

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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      Post count: 2261

      As good as any toast, especially this fall, we’ll know that many of us at any given time of darkness are gazing in the same direction. Cheers to the good spirit of traditional archery. dwc

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
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      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Bruc,

      I don’t know if you will be able to see it from up there. Down here Orion is tracking across the southern sky so from where you are it will be low on the horizon. Orion’s belt should be easy to spot and then his bow and anchor locked in a perpetual full draw. He has his eye on Ursa major I believe?

      Wish I had paid more attention to the sky when I was in Quebec bear hunting. I don’t remember seeing Orion from there.

    • garydavis
      Post count: 101

      Orion shows up in the Eastern sky just before dawn at the end of July here in Washington State and traverses West until Spring. The Dog Star, Sirius, follows him.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514
    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      I was doing some hammock reading here at the beach, and came across this passage in Leopold’s Almanac: “Orion must have been the original mentor of the too early company, for it is he that signals for too-early rising. It is time when Orion has passed west of the zenith about as far as one should lead a teal.”

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      My favorite–signals the coming of fall and then winter:D a piece of trivia–Betelgeuse–His left shoulder and the bright orange star—The next time you look at it consider that you are gazing at the largest object that you will ever see with the naked eye. If old Betel was at our sun’s location it’s outer atmosphere would be at Jupiter’s orbit.

      Mike

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      I’m no good when it comes to the heavens no end of folks have pointed out the constellations and still the only one I can readily see is the big dipper or the plough.

      I rely on the google sky map app.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      The heavens speak best to those who rise before dawn. Except hunting season, that ain’t me. So far as the “feeling” that our time is here, for me it’s the quality of the light in the northern sky, and simply … a feeling. It seems stronger than usual this year, judging by the reports I’m getting from others. Let us hope it bodes well for all concerned.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Like Pothunter I be mostly constellation blind. The big dipper so I can find my way and Cassiopeia, the “big W”. I wonder if Jim,being down under sees it as “the M” :wink:. I love the morning sky, I have some beautiful sunrise pictures that I often use as backgrounds on my PC. I often sit with my bow in hand and watch the day begin, the changing of the guard in the animal world, when I probably ought to have been headed somewhere. But nothing I pursue that day could replace the “morning rise” that fueled my soul.

      Ralph

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Dave, if you aren’t getting up before dawn you aren’t an old man yet 😉

      Ralph, I figure I’m a bit like you, I’m heavenly illiterate (the first time I was in the US I spent a while looking for the southern cross before someone told me you can’t see it there!). My wife, who is considerably better educated and smarter than me, is a bit of an enthusiast and downloaded a really cool app on her iphone (I forget what it’s called). It figures out where you are then you just hold your phone up to the sky and it shows you the stars and constellations where you’re pointing the phone. You can sweep it across the sky and the phone keeps up, showing everything there. It’s a pretty neat educational tool for a dunce like me 😀

      Some fellas can navigate to a pretty decent standard off celestial nav, which is about as trad as it gets and blows my little mind.

      Jim

      PS

      Ralph, yes I am with about watching the sunrise… that transition from sitting in the cold dark, to first light on the horizon, it’s soul lifting.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      “When you see the Southern Cross for the first time

      You understand now why you came this way.

      ‘Cause the truth you might be runnin’ from is so small.

      But it’s as big as the promise – The promise of a comin’ day.”

      With strung bow and coffee in hand……….

      Bout covers it!:D

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Colmike,

      If you taught celestial nav I would definitely defer to your expertise! I’m more or less an arm chair astronomer who looks around once in awhile with a telescope, visits the planetarium once in awhile and remembers summer nights spent star gazing with my Dad in the summer who seemed to know all the constellations and their names and stories. I had forgotten about old Betelguese. The orange glow is the fading light of a dying star. May already be dead but the light is still traveling to us. But to try and keep this about Trad, is Orion drawing a recurve or a longbow? 😀

      Duncan

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Ralph, that was perfect mate! Who wrote it and what’s it from?

      Mike, it’s a different era now my friend! I got qualified this year how to teach guys to use our fancy new hand held GPS and have company staff trying to book their guys in for the 3 day course (in barracks), but I can’t book time to take fellas out for a few days and do some map/compass navigation exercises. Great stuff.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Stephen Stills …

    • Anonymous
      Post count: 124

      Once Orion is visible, I know the time of year is that which suits me and speaks to me best. I think any of us who hear the call of the hunter’s horn know that well.

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Forager wrote: Once Orion is visible, I know the time of year is that which suits me and speaks to me best. I think any of us who hear the call of the hunter’s horn know that well.

      Indeed.:wink:

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