Home Forums Campfire Forum Okay….Stump Shooting..?

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    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Hi Again,

      So here is another question from the resident “Noob”. I see “stump shooting” mentioned quite often while reading different posts and articles but don’t quite understand the purpose. If you shoot at a stump are you taking a chance of damaging an expensive arrow ? Are you shooting Bheads at stumps ? And if so, how would you get it out ? With as much mention as it gets, there must be a reason that this noob just hasn’t figured out. So guys and gals, please help along the education of the unknowing. Thanks for your patience and I hope I’ve managed to bring out a couple of knowing smiles.

      Guy    (Bladeswell)

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 206

      Ahhh…………….. Stump Shooting. Also known as Roving. One of archery’s simple pleasures, alone or with some friends.

      Gather up some expendable arrows and find a place that’s not too rocky or high grass. Somebody picks out a ‘stump’ that could be a leaf, dirt clod, or even a rotten stump. Everybody shoots for bragging rights and on to the next shot. Could be 10 yards or 60 yards.  Blunts that group the same as your broadheads are an asset for realistic hunting practice. Everybody takes turns picking the shot.

      Great way to spend the day.

    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Thanks Richard,

      You cleared up another question for me at the same time. Roving. So as I interpret your answer, it seems a good way to practice at an “estimated” range rather than a known range. Do it enough and your range guesstimation should improve. Do I have it right ? Thanks again.

      Guy   (Bladeswell)

       

       

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 978

      Guy

      Ditto what Richard said–

      Yes you have it right, it can help you practice ranging

      Great practice and loads of fun. Need to be careful on being sure of your target and what’s behind it of course. A lot of hunters carry a smallgame/ stumping arrow while hunting big game, to practice a shot now and then on a long day in the field. Stay tuned so to speak.

      Scout aka Ray

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 206

      This might be sacrilegious but I usually carry a range finder while roving. I’ll take a shot or two and if I’ve misjudged the distance badly, I’ll check it with the laser.  Uphill, downhill and some side hill shots can be a bit tricky sometimes.  Estimate, shoot & confirm.

      Also …………….. As long as it can be done safely and there’s a good chance you’ll be able to find your arrow(s), there’s no such thing as an un-ethical practice shot. Point on and beyond if for no other reason than to just watch the arrow arc up and then down into (or close to) the target. Teaches consistent draw length and proper back tension, too.

    • Charles EkCharles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 559

      In addition to training you in estimating ranges, stumping/roving also teaches you to make shots from unorthodox positions,  through narrow windows in cover, uphill, downhill, etc. Gee, when could that sort of thing ever happen in real life?  😉

    • aeronut
      Member
      Post count: 183

      I always carry a couple of field point arrows with me when I still hunt.  When I get back to the road and head for the truck I do some stump shooting at the numerous cans and cups along the way.  Just be sure that label you see in the grass isn’t attached to a bottle or you may shatter an arrow.

       

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