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    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      I started with the rifle, then to modern archery (compound bow), and now into traditional archery. I wanted to cover all the bases in archery. The simplest of traditional archery I like. To get some knowledge of this sport, I got a book “Beginner’s Guide to Traditional Archery,” it has helped, but I need more information. Bow and Arrow magazine has a section “Stickbows,”I’ve gotten some information from it, but still need an understanding of terms used in traditional archery. What is “dead or semi-dead release, point-on distance and gapping shooting? My bow is Samick Sage 62” 50# limbs, and I know because I have read that 50# may be too heavy, the bow came with 40# limbs that I just didn’t like, I am able to pull more weight, but do not need to, 50# is enough! Help!

    • Robin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 916

      I’m sure some of the other members will chime in soon, but here is a link to the Glossary of Archery Terms posted on our site. That might help with some of your questions. I would also suggest you get T.J.’s book, The Traditional Bowhunter’s Handbook. Pick the Shopping Cart that applies to you and the book is about halfway down the page. If there is anything else I can help you with, please let me know.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      With respect to the particular terms about which you asked:

      “Dead or semi-dead release” Something to be avoided…seriously. It’s when your release hand does not move upon release, aside from your fingers opening. It’s generally indicative of collapsing at the shot or a lack of back tension. Ideally there should be a somewhat rearward movement in your release hand at the shot.

      “Point-on distance” This is the distance at which you can hold the tip of your arrow on the bullseye like a sight pin and hit it.

      “Gap shooting” At distances shorter than point-on, during aiming there will be a “gap” between the tip of your arrow and the bullseye. The tip will appear below the bullseye. Gap shooting is simply incorporating this knowledge into your aiming system. If you want some excellent tutorials on gap shooting I can provide you some links to various different types of gap systems by some of the best barebow archers in the nation.

    • Col Mike
      Member
      Post count: 911

      Welcome Aboard! T.J.’s book recommended by web mother is a must have. Lot’s of great info on this site. Be sure to read the Ashby library. Trust the rest of the members will give your as much information as your credit card can take:D

      Enjoy your new pursuit–be warned it is addictive as R2 says.

      From Wasilla –we have many friends up that way. Check out our website below.

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      2nd the Welcome Aboard! G Fred Asbell’s books are very informative also.

      Have fun.:D

      Ralph

    • Stumpkiller
      Member
      Post count: 193

      A caution on the release. Jerking your hand back is as bad as collapsing on the release. I anchor and then use back tension to expand my chest and release in that motion. My hand moves very little and remains at anchor along my jaw. Not the Hollywood flourish some guys perform a second after the arrow is gone and they realize they were supposed to move something. 😉

      One of my favorite archery books is Shooting the Bow by Larry C. Whiffen (1946). May be able to find it or have a library get it for you. Don’t believe anyone that tells you target techniques do not apply to bowhunting. It’s just a little dirrerent (closed) form but the basics work for both.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Stumpkiller wrote: A caution on the release. Jerking your hand back is as bad as collapsing on the release. I anchor and then use back tension to expand my chest and release in that motion. My hand moves very little and remains at anchor along my jaw. Not the Hollywood flourish some guys perform a second after the arrow is gone and they realize they were supposed to move something. 😉

      One of my favorite archery books is Shooting the Bow by Larry C. Whiffen (1946). May be able to find it or have a library get it for you. Don’t believe anyone that tells you target techniques do not apply to bowhunting. It’s just a little dirrerent (closed) form but the basics work for both.

      Absolutely correct.

      Rearward movement of the string hand upon release should be an involuntary reaction to a properly executed shot. It should never be an action in and of itself.

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      Thanks to all that answered the for HELP! My first compound bow (11/07), there’s more to follow: seven compound bows, 1 crossbow (not too fun shooting it), and my 1 recurve bow. As you can see archery, modern or traditional is very addicting especially if you LOVE the outdoors. I will get the books to learn what I can from them. I hope that I can get good enough with traditional archery, so, one day when Mr. Moose walk’s through the yard, I’ll be ready. Rudy

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      Rudy, if you haven’t already, you should hook up with The Cook Inlet Archers. Tell Vikki that Charlie sent you.

    • SteveMcD
      Member
      Post count: 870

      Welcome to Traditional Archery! I have no Shooting Trophies or Resume to stand on. Just several decades of experience. Ditto.. what everyone said. Just 3 tips.. 1) Focus on your form first, if your form is on, the bow will take care of the rest, 2) it’s very easy to make this stuff complex and there really is no need to be, and 3) Have fun! 8)

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      SteveMcD wrote:

      Just 3 tips.. 1) Focus on your form first, if your form is on, the bow will take care of the rest, 2) it’s very easy to make this stuff complex and there really is no need to be, and 3) Have fun! 8)

      Couldn’t agree more. Sometimes the wisest advice is also deceptively simple.

    • robbin68
      Member
      Post count: 49

      Welcome to traditional archery. I still consider myself a beginner at it because I am not as experienced as many of the guys on here and I still haven’t taken a deer with my recurve but here’s a few things that have helped me become a better shooter. 1. Relax and slow down. When I find that I am shooting poorly it is typically because I am too focused on just winging another arrow at the target to make up for a poor shot. 2. If that doesn’t help, put the bow down and shoot again tomorrow. Getting frustrated will make it less enjoyable. 3. Sounds silly, but I try to pretend my 3d deer is the real thing and every shot is a real opportunity to harvest a deer. Good luck and don’t give it up if you don’t feel successful at first. I have been shooting for five years roughly, exclusively traditional for two years and I am still waiting to take a deer with my equipment.

      [A man is never lost if he does not care where he is at.-unknown]

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