Home Forums Bows and Equipment New "Meat Head" from Tuffhead

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    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      One of my favorite booths at Kzoo last weekend was Joe Furlong’s with his Tuffheads. Joe took the opportunity to introduce his latest head, which he’s dubbed the Meat Head, which is finished in brown. At 190 grains, glue-on, it’s his lightest offering so far. It’s also his first high carbon steel, while the 225 and 300 heads are stainless. Like the others, the Meat Heads are 52 Rockwell (C). While carbon steel requires more attention to prevent corrosion, I’ve never had a problem with that and it allows him to sell them for quite a lot less. They’re the identical length and width of the others, but thinner to get the weight down. I picked up a half dozen and can’t wait to test them for bending or breakage in heavy bone. But even these are thicker and harder than many other popular brands so I’ll be surprised if they don’t make the mark. I’ll stick with the heavier heads for elk but welcome a lighter Tuffhead for deer and prongy. Another new toy to play with, and Joe always welcomes knowledgeable feedback aimed at making his heads even better, good news or bad. 😀

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      David, enjoyed our visit at Kzoo wish we had more time to compare notes on hunting and broadheads but that is the way it is at shows.

      Thank you for your critique of Vintage Archery’s new broad head.

      We had a lot of interest in the new MeatHead and sold quite a few. I believe that the MeatHead while not stainless and not as heavy as the TuffHead models will still out preform other broadheads in the same 190-200 grain weight class.

      As you mentioned we are able to offer the carbon steel broad head at a price considerably less than the SS TuffHead as it is quit cheaper to manufacture,that is the steal is cheaper to purchase and the processing (heat-treat. etc ) is cheaper. Even at a lessor price than the SS TuffHead all of the other features of the premium broadhead were maintained.

      The MeatHead comes factory sharp has a cut on contact tanto tip and is coated with a ceramic finish . It is has same basic dimensions of the TuffHead.

      The MeatHead is not listed on our web site as of yet, but will appear in the coming days

    • JodyS
      Post count: 114

      Like Dave, I picked up some of the “Meat Head” broadheads at KZoo. I am looking forward to giving them a try. I am gluing the inserts in them tomorrow, and hope to introduce them to a doe this weekend (our bow season is still going on here in Arkansas).

      Joe, it was great to meet you. I enjoyed getting to talk with you.

      Jody

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      Yes!

    • T Downing
      Member
      Post count: 233

      This is good news! Love Tuffheads…Looking forward to trying the Meat Heads out. Hopefully I can use them this year for Pronghorn…Thanks Joe

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Joe — Since you can produce and sell carbon steel heads for a lot less than stainless, why not offer the full Tuffhead line in carbon, making them more affordable to more folks? Is the market demand for stainless that much stronger that carbons won’t sell as well even when cheaper? In my case I am happy to take the little additional care to keep carbons shiny and sharp, rather tha pay the extra price. So long as steel quality and hardness is there, and the heads come hunt-ready (and shaving) sharp, either works for me. We are still in full winter mode here, snowing nicely at this moment, so I’m a ways away from testing the new Meat Heads.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      David Petersen wrote: Joe — Since you can produce and sell carbon steel heads for a lot less than stainless, why not offer the full Tuffhead line in carbon, making them more affordable to more folks? Is the market demand for stainless that much stronger that carbons won’t sell as well even when cheaper? In my case I am happy to take the little additional care to keep carbons shiny and sharp, rather tha pay the extra price. So long as steel quality and hardness is there, and the heads come hunt-ready (and shaving) sharp, either works for me. We are still in full winter mode here, snowing nicely at this moment, so I’m a ways away from testing the new Meat Heads.

      David, I had written an answer to your post earlier and some how lost it before it posted.. FUN… FUN …FUN .

      When I got the idea to build a broadhead I did not give much thought to what would be the cheapest way to build it for marketing purposes or I probably have settled on using carbon steel.

      My thought was to build a broadhead that incorporated all Dr.Ashby’s theories and which incorporated my own:idea: ideas. I felt that the “perfect broadhead “ should be made of stainless steel as the edge is easier to maintain as it is not as effected by corission or rust There were several single bevel broadheads on the market , but none that incorporated all of Ashby’s ideas. If I was going to make a premimum broadhead it should be made of stainless. Ask any knife maker they will tell you corrousion and rust are their worst enemy.

      The MeatHead being made of carbon does not weaken it nor is it softer than the stainless. Both the MeatHead and the Tuffhead are the same Rockwell hardness (RC 52) The MeatHead is made of thinner steel as you noted to make it lighter in total weight .It sill is plenty thick at .050. The edge of the carbon steel broadhead does needs attention before hunting , and during prolonged hunts particularly in wet weather.(Vasoline does help)

      I was raised with carbon steel knives and broadheads .

      Traditional hunters of old still think carbon to be superior and that idea right or wrong is reinforced by the attractive price of carbon broadheads.

      I am glad that I can offer a good broadhead (MeatHead) at a reasonable price that gives more hunters the opportunity to use a broadhead that incorporates most of, if not all, of Dr, Ashby’s ideas. I believe traditional hunting will be benefited by it.

      I do not have plans to make any heavier or lighter weight carbon broadheads . For now I am staying with the present line up of broadheads. Every single bevel model requires two version a right and left. It does not take long to develop a lot of inventory with three models.

      I do have thoughts of a heavier TuffHead and have SS steel for it , but don’t know when I will get to it. Most would think a heavier head , more than the 300 grain TH broadhead ,is not practical ……….. .. Some times you just have to follow your ideas . It is all fun .:D

      By the way the MeatHead is now listed on the shopping page of the TuffHead web site

      I did some target practice today.It was cold ,in the teens.I need some thing to blame the poor shoots on I know it can’t be me:oops: Spring will be here sooner than you think Dave, than you can get out and test those broadheads

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      JodyS wrote: Like Dave, I picked up some of the “Meat Head” broadheads at KZoo. I am looking forward to giving them a try. I am gluing the inserts in them tomorrow, and hope to introduce them to a doe this weekend (our bow season is still going on here in Arkansas).

      Joe, it was great to meet you. I enjoyed getting to talk with you.

      Jody

      Jody It was a pleasure meeting you at Kazoo. Thanks for your purchases. Please give me any feedback good or bad with your MeatHead experiences.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      T Downing wrote: This is good news! Love Tuffheads…Looking forward to trying the Meat Heads out. Hopefully I can use them this year for Pronghorn…Thanks Joe

      Tom, I hope you do get a chance to shoot some MeatHeads with good results. I really like your stories and pictures:D

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