Home Forums Bows and Equipment New Arras

Viewing 11 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • aeronut
      Member
      Post count: 162

      Made some 5/16″ Hickory arrows for hunting coyotes and coons.  They will be tough enough to stand up to the floppin’ and raking through the brush if I manage to poke one though a critter.  If I miss I might be able to find them under all the leaf litter.  I’ve got one that is AWOL from a shot last weekend.

      Ahhhhh, the aroma of burnt feathers.

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 141

      Sweet !!!  Gotta love shield cut fletch; it just looks ‘right’.

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2323

      That’s a lot of critter stickers!  Those raccoons must have gotten into the chicken coop 🙁

    • aeronut
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 162

      Fur prices are really low and the buyers around here aren’t taking any raccoon right now.  The coon population is exploding here.  I have shot two in the past that were showing serious signs of canine distemper.  Notified F&G about them and they said dispatch them.  I called in four last Sunday in about a five minute period and could have easily shot them all with a .22.

      Coyotes are thick around here too since the dog men quit running them (old age main factor there).  I have them on security cameras trotting through my yard in the mid afternoon.  Time to cull the herd.

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2323

      Raccoons can be a little too friendly around here too.  I’ve had many opportunities to shoot them with an arrow, but I’ve been reluctant to do it because of  rabies.  Raccoons are a rabies vector species.  I don’t think I want to pick up an arrow covered with Raccoon blood.

      That said, ground hogs are supposed to be a vector species too, and I’ve picked up many arrows covered in their blood with no ill effect.  Oh well, gotta go.  I keep drooling on the keyboard (crazy eyes emoji)

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2524

      I tried one of my arrows on the fence the other day. I’d like to say it was intentional, experimental, but I’d be fibbing’

      The fence won…………

    • aeronut
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 162

      I have six flu-flu arrows that I made over ten years ago.  I used 11/32 Chundoo (Lodgepole pine) shafts with a .38 special blunt.  These have been shot hundreds of times in hunting camp and have bounced off of a lot of things over the years.  I finally broke the blunt off of one last summer shooting at my swinging targets in my yard.  The arrow hit a glancing blow and then hit the tree root at an angle.

      I make the blunts by pressing an 11/32 field point into a ,38 special casing.  They are tough and stand up to a beating.  These have been shot into a railroad tie fence post without breaking.

      My swinging targets are 20 oz plastic soda bottles hanging from tree limbs around my yard.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 886

      Aeronut

      Love your arrows and the swinging target!

      I have made blunts with 38 special cases – but not over top of a field point. I can see were that could strengthen them considerably . I’ll have to try that.

      Scout

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2524

      When I started chopping feathers years ago I could now and then get two 5″ feathers out of one full length, usually a 5″ and a 4″ for sure. Nowadays I get a 5″, sometimes a couple of 4″ers, sometime either a 5″ or 4″ and a flu flu feather.

      I’m getting quite a supply of flu flu feathers…..

      I guess I’ll need to check next fall and see if bow/arrow legal for dove hunting….
      <div class=”img_cont hoff”>Image result for quizzicle smiley</div>
      Bet I need more flu flus than I can carry to score a bird in flight?

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 141

      When I was shooting wood I used to buy the shafts in lots of 100. Would go thru them and straighten, weigh and group them #1, #2 or #3.  The #1s were the good stuff. The #3s…….. lets just say that just because the ground squirrel was sitting on a rock didn’t mean that he was safe.

      When I used .38 casings for blunts, I used to put a couple of .22 lead pellets on the vice and flatten them with a hammer, then drop them into the case with a spot of glue to bring the weight up the same as field points. They shot surprisingly accurate for throw-aways.

      #6 lead shot & a spot of glue works well, also.

    • aeronut
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 162

      Ralph, look up videos like this to make some bird points.  I’ll bet you can hit a flying target a lot easier than you think.  Just takes some practice and someone willing to throw targets up for you.

       

      Richard, I have used lead shot in the casings but the casings were a bit loose on 11/32 shafts and I got tired of wrapping a shim around them or shaving down 23/64 shafts for them to fit tight enough to suit me.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2524

      Lawful Hunting Methods
      Shotguns, archery equipment including crossbows, falconry, dogs, artificial decoys, and manual or mouth-operated bird calls are lawful.

      Legal in Tx. I’ve hunted pheasants with my bow with some success………..Doves, with no success.

      They be a whole different breed of cat when airborne………..They learn while still in the egg how to fly fast, never in a straight line, and how to change direction of flight in a heartbeat.

      If (and when, confidence speaking) I take one down in mid-flight, everyone I know will know….   :-))

      That’s pure bragging rights there!!!!!!!!!!!

      Ummmmmmmmm?????????? A .38 shell casing blunt with lead and lead laws and migratory game bird hunting??????

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

Viewing 11 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.