Home Forums Bows and Equipment My Broadhead Choice

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    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Hello Everyone,

      When I first ventured into archery many years ago, I was shooting compounds and at that time my Bhead of choice was The Nap Thunderheads at 125 grn. So when I once again took up the bow I again bought myself a batch of Thunderheads. Well sense then I’ve done a bit of reading and discovered that those are probably not the best choice for hunting with a much slower recurve at 45#. Most specifically, I found the Ashby reports on the 3 Rivers site.

      Well I soon saw that I can’t afford the money for the arrows and heads available and suggested by Grizzly Stick sense I live on a low fixed income. So I’m considering the Cliff Zwickey 175 grn heads as a good compromise or maybe the Zwickey No Mercy. Am I on the right track or should I be looking at something else ? Thanks for your thoughts and opinions.

      Guy   (Bladeswell)

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 206

      Hard to go wrong with a Zwickey two blade. I like the Eskimo.

      Note; One of the Zwickey heads is considered ‘barbed’. Check your hunting regs.

    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Thanks Again Richard,

      Yep, you’re right. The Zwickey CliffZwickey is the barbed one. I live in Wyoming where there is no mention of barbed arrows in the regs. But just to be safe, I will check with Fish & Game. I like that it is 175 grn. I think the No Mercy is 165. I was able to find field points at 175 but not at 165.

      Guy    (Bladeswell)

       

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 978

      Guy

      The Zwickey heads are excellent . I also, have used the Eskimo successfully. Strong, easy to sharpen and reasonably priced. Hard to go wrong there. Not so much what brand but keeping them razor sharp is the ticket- as you know.

      Scout aka Ray

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 206

      Hey Guy,

      I was actually in Rawlings Wy. once and the wind was NOT blowing. Nobody believes me but it’s the honest truth.

      Speaking of wind, before you go hunting it’s not a bad idea to check your broadhead flight upwind, downwind, & crosswind.  Things can change from a still day to a windy day. Aiming can be a little trickier too.

    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Hi Guys,

      So Richard, you were in Rawlings on the one day of the year with no wind ? However did you manage that ? LoL.  Yeah, there is probably going to be some amount of wind any day in Wyoming. So stumping will give me lots of real life shooting practice. I also really like the idea of estimating the range, taking the shot, then checking the actual range with the range finder. I’ve used one in the past and probably like the rest of you, I would give it a guess first then check it. Sometimes being very surprised at the difference. I also read about the Zwickey Eskimo being very reliable and popular with the Trad crowd. And I believe it but the CliffZwickey just looks so…well…cool.

      Guy    (Bladeswell)

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2342

      I like to keep a “no strings attached” relationship with my arrows.  If you “love” your arrows too much, it’s hard to send them into dangerous situations.  That means I don’t buy anything I can make myself.  I was thinking of making broadheads, but then I found tuskers that are available for about $25 for a half dozen.  Even my time is worth more than that…

      They must be sharpened and they are rougher out of the box than other heads but they are well made.  With a little file work and patience, they are as good a broadhead as I have used.

      Here’s a link: http://www.braveheartarchery.us/tusker_broadheads.htm

      If you try (and are willing to use some elbow grease), you can make a broadhead arrow for less than $6.00

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 206

      Those Tuskers look pretty good. If I ever run out of Zwickeys I’ll give them a closer look. (I found a close-out deal on Zwickeys at $24 a dozen and bought all 10 doz.)

      I like that ‘Arrows with no strings attached’. Mine are marked at the nock. No mark is a number one, suitable for hunting or tournaments. Two lines around the shaft at the nock means an arrow that has a slight defect but is still a very shootable stumper. Three lines and the ground squirrel sitting on a rock is in more trouble than it thinks.

       

    • Guy Seniceros
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Thanks Again All,

      Yeah Man, those Tuskers look just like Zwickeys, All business. You guys have been seeing my nick name, (Bladeswell) so Blades well……I have no problems with sharpening any bladed tools or weapons. In fact, I really enjoy doing it. I get a real sense of satisfaction from getting a razor, shaving sharp edge on whatever I might be working on. Not saying everything needs that type of an edge.

      Guy    (Bladeswell)

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 978

      Guy

      Sharpening is a dying art, kudos to you for developing that skill. As you know very important for a trad hunting archer!

      The Tusker Concorde can be purchased in a long, heavy single bevel also, if you ever want to get involved in the Ashby studies…

      Scout aka Ray

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