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    • Ptaylor
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      Post count: 579

      My wife and I went on a foraging hike today. We found the first patch of Chanterelles this fall! Man, I love these things!

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    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Mushroom Bill went to the ER twice last week because he ate the wrong mushrooms.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Nice haul!

      Hahaha Grumps ๐Ÿ˜†

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Post count: 300

      This is a part of my outdoor Ed I feel I’m sorely lacking. Love mushrooms but don’t know enough to forage. And they all over the place up here in the Adirondacks!

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Great find! I wish we had those on our property, but I haven’t found any yet.

    • skifrk
      Post count: 387

      love mushroom hunting with the wife and now as the daughter gets older she can go along with us too. We don’t see as many chantrelles but other variety’s.

    • Dan Sweeney
      Post count: 94

      Beautiful. Few things beat the assorted wild mushrooms. I’ll be out at a wilderness area cabin next weekend and hope to find some Chicken of the Woods.

    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 579

      Dan, how do you cook chicken of the woods? I have tried it twice and didn’t enjoy it very much. But lots of folks eat it, and I see it on the trees once in a while.

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      I love chantrelles. Unfortunately, I am allergic to them! The secret to chicken of the woods is to carefully trim off just the thin outer rim–no more than an inch and maybe less than that. The rest is tough and pulpy, but you can cook the trimmed edge just as you would any other mushroom. Don

    • Todd Smith
      Post count: 167

      I have been getting into mushrooms more lately. Have not found Chantrelles but just had Shaggy Mane for breakfast with scrambled eggs and Hen of the Woods last weekend with eggs once and with onions, red pepper, and garlic once. (Side dish for the last of the venison backstrap from last season.)

      Be careful with the identifying… I have several books and when convenient also do some confirming online. Then I ‘test’ to see how my body will react by eating just a small amount first.

      Mushrooms have added another really cool element to my ‘stalking and still hunting.’ ๐Ÿ˜€

      Enjoy!! Todd Smith

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    • Alexandre Bugnon
      Member
      Post count: 681

      Nice knife, Todd! I hope that for the sake of authenticity, it is a Victorinox and not the much debated (In Switzerland) copycat Wenger!!:D

    • Todd Smith
      Post count: 167

      alexbugnon wrote: Nice knife, Todd! I hope that for the sake of authenticity, it is a Victorinox and not the much debated (In Switzerland) copycat Wenger!!:D

      Alex, I have to admit – you made me look. ๐Ÿ™‚

      I am relieved to say it is a Victorinox. ๐Ÿ™‚ Todd

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      The trick in gathering wild mushrooms is not to exceed your confidence level. A good place to start is with the “Foolproof Four”: puffballs, chicken of the woods, chantrelles, and morels. Branch out from there, hopefully with the knowledge of mentors. Almost all boletes are fine as are orange delicious and a number of other readily identifiable species. Remember that there is really only one mushroom in North America that will flat out kill you (without a liver transplant): Amanita phalloides. Know what it looks like and beware. (it’s not hard.) Don

    • Ptaylor
      Member
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      Post count: 579

      Don, I’d add 2 items to your list: First, Hedgehog mushrooms are really easy to ID because they have spines underneath their cap instead of gills. Around here (NW CA), there isn’t anything to confuse them with, and they taste great!

      Second, there are some inedible/poisonous Boletes, but all of them bruise blue when broken or squished. So watch out for Boletes that bruise blue, the rest are good.

      I enjoy perusing the mushroom aisle at our Co-op grocery store. Whatever is fruiting in season and readily identifiable is sold there. So I’ll check out the mushrooms there to help learn a new one. I figure if they sell it in the grocery store to the general public it must be relatively safe. However, we cooked up a meal of Matsutakes and my body rejected them while my wife loved them. So everyone reacts differently to each mushroom. I even know a gal who cannot eat chanterelles. I like to try a small piece of a shroom for the first time.

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Don’t tell Bill, but I saw a big chicken of the woods near a deer trail yesterday. Not going to harvest it for him, or tell him about it, because if it is harvested it will scare the deer. ๐Ÿ˜•

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      Preston–I certainly agree with your advice about testing any new mushroom in small amounts because of the wide range of individual intolerance of perfectly good species. Like your friend, I just can’t eat chantrelles, which was a heart-breaker when I was growing up in Washington State, where they were everywhere. To the best of my knowledge there is only one toxic bolete–the aptly named “Devil’s Bolete”. It’s pretty easy to recognize, and your tip about bruising blue is a good one. There are actually several species of scaly hedgehog mushrooms, so you need to know the ones in your area. Where you are, all indeed may be fine, but others can lead to nausea and vomiting.That’s about the worst thing that can happen with most of the “bad” mushrooms, except amanita phalloides. Everyone needs to be able to recognize that one and steer clear! Don

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