Home Forums Bows and Equipment Movable nocking point

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • Dennis
      Post count: 52

      I’m in the process of retuning a few of my bows. (it’s winter.) I’m having trouble adjusting the nocking point on my strings during the tuning process. My final nocking point will be tied-on unwaxed dental floss and fletchtite. When I use a metal nocking point it’s either too difficult to move or so loose I shoot it off the string. Any suggestions or tips on a temporary nocking point material for use while tuning?

    • Robert Gilbert
      Member
      Post count: 22

      Dennis wrote: I’m in the process of retuning a few of my bows. (it’s winter.) I’m having trouble adjusting the nocking point on my strings during the tuning process. My final nocking point will be tied-on unwaxed dental floss and fletchtite. When I use a metal nocking point it’s either too difficult to move or so loose I shoot it off the string. Any suggestions or tips on a temporary nocking point material for use while tuning?

      [u]se masking tape[It is easy to adjust and remove:?/u]

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2371

      If you find the tied on nocks to be less reliable than you had expected, you might give the brass nock sets a try again. I suspect your troubles are due to your nock pliers, not the nocks themselves.

      There are good pliers and bad pliers. I had a real nice set a few years back but lost it in a move. I went through a few since then and spent a few years trying the tied-on nocks too. I have found another half decent pliers sold by Carbon Express. And overall, I find the brass nocks are less trouble and more easily adjustable…

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      What Steve Graf says. As strings stretch, and in my experience they never completely quit stretching, esp. if we leave our bows unstrung for long periods, permanent nocking points become unworkable. I have never ever in my life had problems with clamp-on brass nocks slipping or coming off. Frequently I use the same one over and over, spreading it open to remove then clamping it back down on a new string. The pliers, made for this purpose, always bring it back to round. There are many ways to go about it, certainly, but with the right pliers I think your troubles will be over. IMHO

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      With respect to brass nock sets, keep in mind they come in three sizes as denoted by the color of their rubber layer. Red is the largest, black is mid sized, and blue is the smallest. Use one that’s too small and it may fly off. Use one too large and it won’t crimp down tightly and may slip.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Great info, Jason! Can’t believe I’ve never picked up on that. So far as I can recall, all mine, since they were invented, had black rubber grippers, and I’ve not seen the other colors advertised, though I don’t spend much time perusing supplier websites and catalogs. With the ongoing shift to thinner FF strings (I’m shooting an 8-strand and there are 6-stranders out there) the blue nocks could become more common. Although, due I presume to complaints about standard arrow nocks coming off the skinny strings, and/or thin strings being uncomfy even with a shooting glove, lately it seems the top-end makers of skinny strings (like SBD) are wrapping the servings thicker to compensate. So far I’ve had no problems with the blacks, but this is an interesting tidbit to learn at this late stage, thanks.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2371

      David Petersen wrote: … So far I’ve had no problems with the blacks…

      That’s because the size of the nock set used should be relative to the size of the arrow nock. And generally speaking, most arrow nocks today will fit a sting built to the diameter of a black nock set…

      – If a small nock set is needed to fit the string correctly, then the arrow will fall off the string easily.

      – If a large nock set is needed to fit the string correctly, then the arrow will fit too tightly on the string.

      I have found that the black nock set is the correct size for carbon arrow nocks. So if it won’t fit the string correctly, no need even trying an arrow.

      Which is yet another example of a good life lesson learned from traditional archery – medium is good.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      I second masking tape as temporary nock and use bow string tied with a double constrictor knot to make permanent nock points, no glue just grunt and they don’t move. Nice thing is you don’t need spare nock points and pliers in your pack, just in case.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Steve,

      You beat me to it. Since I primarily shoot Easton Uni Nocks, the diameter of my string at the center serving dictates a medium nock set. The nocks I glue on wood shafts for small game arrows have a slightly larger throat, so the bow I use for that type of hunting gets a string with a slightly thicker center serving and a large nock set. The same goes for my bowfishing setup.

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.