Home Forums Friends of FOC Meatheads and carbon arrow sleeves

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    • tailfeather
      Post count: 417

      If one were to shoot Meatheads with a total point weight of 350 gr, would it be necessary to have the “sleeving” behind the point? I see several of you using those sleeves (aluminmum shafts cut to length?) to add strength to that portion of the shaft with a heavy head….primarily with wood shafts, but I’m pretty sure with carbon, too.

      Even with my current setup using a Magnus 1, I still have 345 gr up front. Just wondering if it is something I should consider, as I’m completely ignorant on the subject.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      Hardly anything remotely near an “expert” but Doc A sold me on over-footing, which is what I call the 2117 over my GT shaft ends… and other shafting I use.

      My reason was, as Ed and I discussed, I wanted lighter GPI carbons…only way to get that, (so I didn’t end up shooting rebar arrow weight), was to go to the target type shafts…which had thinner walls and lower GPI overall.

      using 100 gr. inserts, I fashioned over-footing about 2.5″ long to reinforce the lighter wall shafts BEHIND the end of the 100 gr. brass insert. That is where most arrows have broken for me or bent when I shot alum decades ago.

      It adds a slight amount of weight, but I’ve yet to bust up arrows with that on and hit a few into rocks…totally screwed up the field point, but left the shaft undamaged. I don’t know what others call it, but I call it “over-footing’. Ed did some work on internal footing of a parabolic tapered bit of hardwood doweling behind the insert, but they seemed tedious to produce and make —consistently…alum arrow over-footing was simple by comparison.

      YMMV

    • Dan Jackowiak
      Post count: 106

      I use a 1″ footing over my skinny shafts that have a 50gr HIT insert. They are tuff as hell, I have not broken one yet.

    • jpcjpc
      Member
      Post count: 170

      I save a lot with footing

      Here is the best answer

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2330

      I had a problem with getting a sleeved arrow into the back of the meathead. The broadhead is designed to come over the end of the shaft and protect it, which is great. But the problem is that the inserts go way down into the broadhead. When you tighten the shaft onto the insert, you need to make sure it bottoms out on the insert, and not the inner wall of the broadhead. Hopefully that makes sense…

      I ended up having to ditch the aluminum sleeves to insure contact between the insert and the arrow.

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      Steve Graf wrote: I had a problem with getting a sleeved arrow into the back of the meathead. The broadhead is designed to come over the end of the shaft and protect it, which is great. But the problem is that the inserts go way down into the broadhead. When you tighten the shaft onto the insert, you need to make sure it bottoms out on the insert, and not the inner wall of the broadhead. Hopefully that makes sense…

      I ended up having to ditch the aluminum sleeves to insure contact between the insert and the arrow.

      Steve What you are describing is correct. The proper sequence is to seat the adaptor inTO the broad head with glue.Then screw the arrow onto the the adaptor. If you are going to use a footing push the footing down firmly so it contacts the broad head.Mark the arrow at the top of the footing . Unscrew the arrow place the footing to the mark and glue. Every thing should match up.

      Some footings over the arrow will fit down inside the broad head depending on the diameter and the footing used. Either way if use the corrective procedure it all works out.

      F

      [b]TAILFEATHER To the original post[/b] Footings are a matter of choice.:?: Some add footings for additional weight .Most use footings for additional insurance against breaking,bending or mushrooming of the arrow tip. If one hits a hard object there is a extreme amount of pressure applied to the adaptor and insert. Enough impact can force the insert in to the arrow causing a mushroom or split. I would guess that the number oF people ‘not’ using footings overwhelm those that do. Conversely archers into heavy arrows and EFOC use footings almost exclusively.:D

    • Vintage Archer
      Member
      Post count: 276

      Steve Graf wrote: I had a problem with getting a sleeved arrow into the back of the meathead. The broadhead is designed to come over the end of the shaft and protect it, which is great. But the problem is that the inserts go way down into the COURISITYbroadhead. When you tighten the shaft onto the insert, you need to make sure it bottoms out on the insert, and not the inner wall of the broadhead. Hopefully that makes sense…

      I ended up having to ditch the aluminum sleeves to insure contact between the insert and the arrow.

      STEVE I GOT THINKING ABOUT THE PROBLEM YOU WERE HAVING WITH THE FOOTING NOT GOING INTO THE TAPER OF THE BROADHEAD. THE INSIDE DIAMETER OF THE FERRULE IS 23/64” ….JUST OUT OF

      CURIOSITY WHAT OD ARROW AND AL.FOOTINGS WERE YOU USING ??

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2330

      Gold tip 55/75 traditional arrows. I’ll have to check on the aluminum sleeve. Made from some old aluminum arrows that fit nicely over it. I’ll find out the arrow size and update.

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