Home Forums Bows and Equipment Looking for a good broad head

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    • newbreedarcher
      Post count: 28

      Hey guys! I’m looking for a broadhead to use this season. I’ve heard a lot about single bevel bh’s and was curious, what do you guys think of them? And what is a good choice for an affordable one? Thanks a lot:D

    • Ireland
      Post count: 108

      newbreedarcher wrote: Hey guys! I’m looking for a broadhead to use this season. I’ve heard a lot about single bevel bh’s and was curious, what do you guys think of them? And what is a good choice for an affordable one? Thanks a lot:D

      Lots of good ones to choose from and most will get the job done.

      If you want the best…take a close look at the TuffHead.

      Ireland

    • Stumpkiller
      Member
      Post count: 193

      I’m a fan of the STOS (plain ‘ol double bevel) and the Magnus II are also viceless broadheads.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Anyone used the new VPA two-blades yet?

    • sapcut
      Post count: 159

      I would definitely suggest the TuffHead as well. It’s difficult to understand what a superb cutting tool it is until you hold it then put it through an animal.

      I recently killed a good wild boar with a TuffHead 300. That broadhead went through 4 inches of shield armour and everything in between…. only to come out bloody and STILL shaving hair from my arm. Very impressive to me.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      newbreedarcher wrote: And what is a good choice for an affordable one? Thanks a lot:D

      With that in mind, I’d probably go with Grizzlys. Last I saw they were around $33 for six, have been around for decades, and enjoy an excellent reputation.

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      I’ve used the Grizzly heads on and off over the past 20years. Kept going back to them when the bouble bevel heads I tried didn’t hold up as well.

      Havn’t seen the new one out now, but the older ones were a pain to get sharp.

      This season I’ll be using the 300gr Tuffheads. I like the size and material they are made of. They also come almost ready to hunt with. I’ll only have to touch up the edge to make them ready for my quiver.

      Troy

    • T Downing
      Member
      Post count: 233

      Another vote for Tuffhead!

    • newbreedarcher
      Post count: 28

      I’ve been looking at tuffheads for some time now. My only questions are: do they come in a screw in type, or are they only glue-on? And also, what type of target can I use with them? I’ve been told I need a thin dense cell target because they cork-screw in the target and removal is near impossible without taking the bh off. Is this true?

    • sapcut
      Post count: 159

      They are glue-on. If it was screw-on and the threads or threaded shank gets bent then the entire broadhead is toast. The glue-on also is muuuuccchhh more versatile when changing weight up front, etc.

      The wide bevels do twist through a target, lungs or bone and that’s a good thing. I personally use the old school stryofoam targets about 12″ wide. I never want to use a broahead target that is too dense to prevent the broadhead from exiting the back side. That way I know I’ll never loose the broadhead in the middle of the target.

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Well said, Sap!!

      Troy

    • woodchuck
      Member
      Post count: 40

      I was wondering the same thing about screw-in availability, then checked Tuffhead website. They do have screw in adapters available at http://www.vintagearcheryco.com/shop/

      Not sure how they work, very new to Traditional Archery, so still learning.

    • turok
      Post count: 25

      Killed a small pig last feb. with a simmons tiger shark.

      Huge holes,lots of blood, 15yards and down.

      Screw in or glue ons. They also shoot beautiful!

      Turok

    • wideangle
      Member
      Post count: 35

      Magnus 2 blades sharpen well and if shot into the vitals are lethal.

    • Dan Jackowiak
      Post count: 106

      I like the Werewolfs

    • Fletcher
      Post count: 177

      The Tuffheads are great broadheads; Grizzlys are a more economical choice and a very good head as well. I’m pretty fond of the 200 gr model, formerly the ElGrande, now the Kodiak. The new Grizzlys have a MUCH better grind than in the past. These are all SB heads, a good choice IMO.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      I am among the relative few who have had a chance to field test the relatively new Tuffhead. Shot plumb through a nice bull elk last year; he went only 15 yards before going down and was dead in as many seconds … and he walked rather than ran that 15 yards as if he was only slightly spooked, not having felt a thing as the magic lazered through his chest. Those were 225s with carbon shafts. This year I’ll be shooting the 300s with wood shafts. However, you don’t necessarily need that kind of head weight for all game, like typical small whitetails, IMHO. If you’re shopping for lighter heads my advice is to stick with the same basic characteristics manifest in the Tuffhead: high MA (long and narrow, which the VPA lighter heads are NOT), single bevel, steel hardness 50-54 for an ideal combo of toughness and sharpenability. For turkey this spring I’ll be shooting the same heads I used with impressive results for Coues whitetail this past winter: STOS 145s custom ground to single-bevel from blanks. STOS should be encouraged to offer single-bevels in the 150-175 mid-weight zone … and/or Tuffhead should be encouraged to make a lighter model, if that’s possible, which I doubt as a certain steel thickness is necessary to provide strength and a nice wide bevel shelf, the engine that produces torque.

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      I like the tuffheads but for economy you might try the eclips single bevel . Ive had good luck using the steel adapters on glue on blades . I use JB weld epoxy on them . Haven’t had any trouble with alignment or anything coming loose etc. I wish I could say I was able to field test the TH on one of these rangy Moose but they eluded me all fall only to emerge in my backyard in MARCH ! 😆

    • mikelee
      Post count: 86

      Hey Dave what kind of wood(for shafts) are you planning to use in that setup .

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Mike — Fletcher (Rick Stillman) of The Feathered Shaft is making these up for me. Shafts are single-tapered 23/64 Sitka spruce, fletched with 4×3″ (not A&A). I used test shafts to determine the proper spine for my 53# Shrew at 85# for the 300 Tuffhead. In order to keep the weight down to not much over 700 grains total, it took a while for Rick to collect a batch of shafts with low weight and the required spine, and even then he got only 9. It appears FOC will be 20-21%, which may be about the highest possible with wood and not that shabby. The whole battle is to find wood with high enough spine without killer weight. If these shafts perform as expected (based on shooting test arrows), I’ll put in a standing order with Rick for more of the same, as he’s able to collect them. I’m thinking, without any real knowledge, that perhaps a new generation of compressed shafts could be the answer to higher spine without excess weight, for greater FOC. Dave

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Dave,

      If someone could compress stika spruce that might be the ticket. I played around with compressing poplar when I was making shafts. The compressed material produced higher spines than the same material uncompressed. I took material that came from the same board to do the comparison. Weight was quite a bit heavier on the compressed shafts as well. If the increase in spine allows the maker to use lighter weight material that would normally yeild lower spines then the weight would be lower as well.

      Troy

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