Home Forums Campfire Forum lessons learned

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    • maddawg
      Member
      Post count: 30

      I know the season is just beginning but sitting in my stand I had a thought post a few hard earned lessons learned from this season.

      when setting a blind or stand remember the sun.

      never try to use a self climber on a shag bark hickory

      I might shoot wheels but I have a traditional heart

    • Anonymous
      Post count: 124

      [quote=maddawg

      never try to use a self climber on a shag bark hickory

      So true.

    • maddawg
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 30

      change all batteries before the season starts and remember 2 is one and one is none when it comes to critical items (flashlights’)

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      If you are climbing this year don’t ever forget your safety harness. There are guys out there that will tell us we don’t want to learn that lesson the hard way. I shudder now to think of all the hunts with little or no fall protection in my past. I guess I was just lucky. Today I would not go up without one.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      maddawg wrote: change all batteries before the season starts (flashlights’)

      And bring waterproofed spares ๐Ÿ˜€

    • David Fudala
      Post count: 224

      Enjoy the moment you are in out there, it will never happen again!

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Extra batteries are silly. How are you going to change them in the dark? You need at least 2 flashlights. A head lamp, a small lamp to see to change the batteries in the head lamp. And a third to pound the crap out of the other two when they don’t work.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      grumpy wrote: Extra batteries are silly. How are you going to change them in the dark? You need at least 2 flashlights. A head lamp, a small lamp to see to change the batteries in the head lamp. And a third to pound the crap out of the other two when they don’t work.

      Oh…and glasses to see to change the Mini-Mag bulbs that you drop in the leaf litter trying to get that wee thing outa the base of the flashlight…

      As for one to pound, Grumpy, hell, I have enough ready rocks for that! My MiniMag burned a bulb… dang. It was blacker than the inside of a sack of black cats. I had #2 in my pocket!

      That would be #2 FLASHLIGHT in me pocket!:shock:

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      ROFL

      But how do you find the rock???

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      grumpy wrote: ROFL

      But how do you find the rock???

      Same way I find bedposts, doorjambs and other things under foot in the dark…take off your boots and stub your toe on one… there it is!:roll:

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      grumpy wrote: Extra batteries are silly. How are you going to change them in the dark?

      Haha, that’s why the gods gave us moonlight and starlight, to change batteries with. Anyway, if a clutz like me can strip and assemble a machine gun blindfolded, a normal, fully functional man can surely pop a battery cap and fit a couple of batteries ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      Back before GPS I got all screwed around in northern Maine. Took out the compass and decided the compass was drunk. After passing the same moose track after a couple hrs of corkscrewing around, I said maybe that thing knows something! By God it was smarter than me:wink: A good humbling I’d good now and then.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      I bought one of those GPS things once…a Garmin E-trex.

      Read, studied, practiced. Once in our river hills, I was at a place I knew well… I did the waypoint for the truck before leaving. I knew where I was, but it kept telling me to go in a direction I knew was a sheer drop 400′ down to the river.

      I gave it away! Had I been somewhere I wasn’t familiar, and followed that thing… the last thing I’d have said would have been similar to Sundance’s commentary jumping off the ledge into the river in Butch Cassidy movie

    • Col Mike
      Member
      Post count: 911

      You want to be very cautious when using gps in mountains and lots of trees. As the one time head of the Space Command command center—this reluctant grunt had to learn some things–not trad. but could keep you safe. Those devices in cars and used in cities are ground augmented. Sat. talks to a ground station and walla you have 3 meter accuracy. Out in the boonies–unless your with a military operation–your receiver is just getting that 2 watt signal from you hope–at least 3 sats. with the right geometry. Well then we have to talk about PDOP which is more then I will go into here–if really interested pm me. Bottom line–in the wild- map and compass skills will be my choice. My humble opinion.

      And Ausjim is not a clutz he just learned how to do that in the standard military way —mindless repetition–followed by blunt trauma.:D

      Mike

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Mike– your last line sure sums up my time in the Corps! ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    • jason samkowiak
      Post count: 141

      paleoman wrote: Back before GPS I got all screwed around in northern Maine. Took out the compass and decided the compass was drunk. After passing the same moose track after a couple hrs of corkscrewing around, I said maybe that thing knows something! By God it was smarter than me:wink: A good humbling I’d good now and then.

      This is the story of my life…lol

      If i had a nickel for every time i argued with my compass id be a rich man!

      So far though, the compass has proved to be right everytime.

      I will add a lesson learned.

      sunrise does not have a snooze button! nothing better than hitting the snooze one more time, but nothing worse that rushing to get on stand because you slept in.

      If you think you will be warm enough add one more layer.

      Pee BEFORE you get all dressed up, nothing worse than having to pee bad and then having to fish thru 11 layers of clothing to get a handle on the situation.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      jasonsamko wrote:

      Pee BEFORE you get all dressed up, nothing worse than having to pee bad and then having to fish thru 11 layers of clothing to get a handle on the situation.

      Jason, I read a great quote from Shackleton that from memory went: “One of the greatest challenges of Antarctic exploration is getting 2 inches of manhood past 4 inches of wool every morning.”

      You reminded me of that ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      Batteries, batteries! That “them things I wish I’d brung some of’em”?:D When I was in the corps we couldn’t interpret the signal from Sputnik. :D, so kindly persuasion from wanna be DI’s in ITR taught me the value of compass and map. Camp Horno at Camp Pendleton had way too many rattlers in the area to go roaming around in the dark without a return guide plus the ice cream and cookies given upon a proper and timely return to point “A” were an incentive:P. Maybe not those. Ever been “swimming in the sand”? Bet a few of you know about that. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Don’t miss point “B” or “C”!

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      get a handle on the situation

      That, Jason, is the most polite way I ever heard a very masculine dilemma ever put!!!:lol:

      R2, I love your tag line!!! Excellent! World would be a better place if we all subscribed to that simple ditty!

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      colmike wrote: And Ausjim is not a clutz he just learned how to do that in the standard military way —mindless repetition–followed by blunt trauma.:D

      Mike

      My Dad used to call that “the military way of teaching ya” Yes, colmike he repeated it mindlessly, and frequently threatened blunt trama.

      Laughed so load at this thread that it woke the kid up @#$%^&*

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Doc Nock wrote:

      Oh…and glasses to see to change the Mini-Mag bulbs that you drop in the leaf litter trying to get that wee thing outa the base of the flashlight..

      Which glasses?

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      ausjim wrote: [quote=grumpy]

      Haha, that’s why the gods gave us moonlight and starlight, to change batteries with. Anyway, if a clutz like me can strip and assemble a machine gun blindfolded, a normal, fully functional man can surely pop a battery cap and fit a couple of batteries ๐Ÿ˜‰

      I’ve never been called normal, and fully functional is juat a memory. On the other hand I can cast a fly dead on in the dark. But then I’ve been told that isn’t normal.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      grumpy wrote:

      On the other hand I can cast a fly dead on in the dark. But then I’ve been told that isn’t normal.

      I need to get you down here on the Yellow Breeches for the dead dark of night white fly hatch in August!:roll:8)

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Actually I was on my way about 10 years ago when Arwen arrived.

      Life is what happens while we are making other plans.

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      grumpy wrote: Actually I was on my way about 10 years ago when Arwen arrived.

      Life is what happens while we are making other plans.

      Ah, yes… Well, it petered out pretty badly for a few years, but I’m told that it’s coming back. I’ve not been there in years…standing in the water to “reserve” a spot from 3pm till dark about 7:30pm is not my idea of a fun way to spend an afternoon.

      Neither is casting flies in the dark. Turn on a light and you’re immediately engulfed in bugs and can’t untangle a mess!

      Archery, while at times frustrating, is way simpler!

    • grumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      Daylight is always simpler.

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