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    • SDMFer
      Post count: 54

      Undoubtedly, some of you other than me have received the 2011 Cabela’s archery catalog. I was flipping through the catalog and thought it would be good place to start looking at the “state” of bowhunting. So, I went though and made some notes and I thought maybe you would like to see what I found.
      First the break down by number of PAGES for each category:

      10 for compound bows not counting youth
      3 for traditional bows
      1 for traditional accessories
      11 pages of crossbows, including one that cocks with a push of a button powered by a CO2 canister
      5 crossbow accessories
      14 arrows and arrow building supplies
      10 broadheads
      4 arrow rests
      8 sights
      4 releases
      7 targets
      15 game cameras and game camera accessories
      8 pages scents and scent control
      9 game feeders and food plot seed/accessories
      5 rangefinders, including one bow mounted

      There was also a large number of pages dedicated to clothing, boots, optics, etc. that were not included in my list just to save some space.

      Something that bothers me because I think it speaks directly to what is wrong with the mainstream hunting “culture” of today, the Michael Waddell Bone Collector Logo shows up 28 times through the catalog (I could have missed a few). Granted, this is biased since I didn’t count other logos and probably just reflects my distaste for Mr. Waddell and his hunter hero compatriots on the outhouse channel.

      More than anything, what bothers me the most from this list is the fact that in the archery catalog there are more pages for crossbows than even compound arrow launching devices. Understanding of course that this is just a narrow snapshot of the industry, we can still infer based on what they [Cabelas] present and the proportions each category is presented, that this is what they expect to sell, and/or this is what the current bowhunting public is interested in.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      To be honest, I would’ve expected to see exactly what you found. That’s why I don’t get the Cabela’s archery catalog anymore.

    • SteveMcD
      Member
      Post count: 870

      I am not surprised either. And grateful to be a Traditional Bowhunter.

      Years ago.. we all subscribed to Herter’s and Cabela’s and Gander Mountain…. because they were strictly mail order and you could get a decent break on quality outdoor gear. And in many cases (such as Herter’s – now out of business – sadly, sniff), the only resource available to find many things you needed. Now the Big Three – Cabela’s, Gander Mountain and Bass Pro have over extended their overhead. More stores, more inventory, greater logistics challenges and of course, advertisement and “celebrity” overhead. So the product mark up is insane. 🙄

      Do you really need to pay 150 dollars for a pair of pants!!! :shock::lol::P

      I refuse to buy from them anymore. 8)

    • Homer
      Post count: 110

      Right on, SDMFer. Thanks for doing this research and sharing with us. Coincidentally, I too just got a Cabelas catalog in the mail and brought it home. Normally they go straight into the recycle bin. I too thought it would be informative, if disgusting, to see what the latest garbage is they are hawking, and who the latest batch of “pro staff” wh…. are and what they look like. It’s important to spread the word. For years when I’ve mention to folks that I boycott Cabelas, they way “Why,” clearly clueless even though the reasons are right there on glossy paper. The deeper you look into the Cabelas operation, the more filth you find. There are strong reasons to boycott these geeks in addition to Steve’s comments on pricing. IMHO, Homer

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Homer wrote: …and what they look like.

      😆 That just sounded funny to me.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Patrick — Doesn’t most everything “sound funny” to you? 😛

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      Unfortunately, you have identified a fundamental problem. In a money-driven culture such as ours, the default position will always be the one that makes the most $ for the most well-connected people. (After all, we have the best Congress money can buy.) Thanks to some well known basic flaws in human nature, there will always be more money in crossbows than in longbows, which is why archery seasons as we know them will likely soon be a thing of the past (helped along by input and clout from groups ranging from industry associations to the NRA, which supports the introduction of crossbows into archery seasons.) That’s also why we have illegal ORV’s over-running wilderness areas, and why development interests will eventually gobble up as much of that wilderness as they possibly can. Sad but true… Meanwhile, watch who you choose to buy from and associate with. Don

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      David Petersen wrote: Patrick — Doesn’t most everything “sound funny” to you? 😛

      I resemble that remark. 🙂

    • Backcountry Joe
      Post count: 39

      The state of the hunting community is sad. The Trueblood days of Field and Streams are gone!

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      donthomas wrote:
      Thanks to some well known basic flaws in human nature, there will always be more money in crossbows than in longbows

      This bears repeating.

      8)

    • W David McLendonW David McLendon
      Member
      Post count: 56

      Smithhammer wrote: [quote=donthomas]
      Thanks to some well known basic flaws in human nature, there will always be more money in crossbows than in longbows

      This bears repeating.

      8)
      Yes it does, easy , quick, zero skill required….A shortcut to the fist pumping manic behavior that makes me want to puke.

    • Crookedstick
      Post count: 38

      Wow. Yeah, that’s crazy. I can’t believe anyone thinks they need all that modern stuff:

      Fiberglas bow lams
      Metal broad heads
      Metal arrows?!?!
      Screw-in tips
      Strings that don’t stretch
      Camo…what a fiasco THAT is…heck, for that matter, cloth fabric.
      Boots?! Mocs are the way to go when it’s cold. Barefoot otherwise.

      Geez, you’re right, too easy, too quick and not much skill required anymore.

      Boycott ’em all. We dont need no stinkin’ clothes! It’s all a fad and will never catch on, you’ll see.

    • trapperDave
      Post count: 62

      I dont see the problem really. Who cares what others choose to use? I dont need BillyBob shooting “trad” like me to feel verified nor do I feel threatened by what my neighbor chooses to hunt with. I use what appeals to ME for no reason other than…it appeals to ME.

      We are HUNTERS. Some of us are trad bowHUNTERS, some primitive bowHUNTERS, some are crossbowHUNTERS and gunHUNTERS. There IS one commonality to ALL….we are HUNTERS and must learn to respect the rights of others in whatever method they choose so long as its legal.

      If ANY of us truly wanted EASY…we would go the grocery store and no farther.

      my .02

    • Crookedstick
      Post count: 38

      Amen TrapperDave, and thanks for pointing that out, but you forgot us naked bowHUNTERS:lol:

    • trapperDave
      Post count: 62

      those are called skeeter bait 😆

    • George McCloskey
      Member
      Post count: 55

      Most of my Cabelas marketing mail goes right into the fireplace. That said, it is a great source for outdoor equipment most of which is good quality. However, I don’t buy anything archery related from them except for a hat or two.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      It’s to deaf ears at Cabela’s it seems, when I send mail to the company that I can access any product that they offer through the internet and I see no sense on wasting so much paper with a plethora of catalogs.How much could prices be reduced (Haha) if so much paper and ink was saved.
      Also, why does the post office advertise $5 shipping deals when Cabela’s charges way more than that for nearly weightless products? Just curious on the latter. Maybe some fine print that I haven’t learned to read yet in 66 yrs.

    • loneviking
      Post count: 9

      Well, to be fair, if there is something I need and can only get through the catalog then all I have to do is choose the ‘pick up at store’ option and there’s no shipping charge.
      And there are some supplies such as reloading and arrow making that are cheaper at Cabela as they buy in bulk.

      But clothes and fad gizmos? They’d go broke trying to survive off what I spend! Somebody is buying a lot of hightech junk that will likely never be used. And that does make me wonder about some of the hunting crowd in the woods today.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      ‘Pick up at store’ option good for many I suppose but for many more an option it is not. It’s a “purty fer piece” from Amarillo to a Cabela’s store so postage we pay if upon rare occasion something is purchased. I’ve backed out twice from ordering something I wanted when $80 turns into a tad over $100 before I’d get it. I can make do for $20.

    • StickbowmanMI
      Member
      Post count: 10

      I actually went to the Cabelas in Dundee, Michigan and since they revamped the store, I visited the archery section again. I found almost nothing for the Traditional Shooter. I don’t even look at their catalog anymore. If they are not interested in Traditional archery, then I don’t need them. Just my two cents on the matter. I would rather deal with the advertisers that are listed in Traditional Bowhunter Magazine.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      One thing I’ve noticed on the Cabela’s website is that many of their ‘traditional’ archery accessories are significantly more expensive than they are from places like 3 Rivers or Kustom King, when it’s the exact same product from the exact same manufacturer.

    • rnorris
      Post count: 88

      I live pretty close to a cabelas here in Michigan. At first I loved it . As the years went by, thier traditional archery selection dwindled to nothing, and crossbows GREW. I too saw the archery catalog, it held my attention for about 15 seconds. What a shame.

      I railed against crossbows here in Michigan for years. We lost. My biggest problem with it was the fact it was being shoved down our throats by big business. Nobody wanted a crossbow here until big business TOLD the idiots they needed one. It was such a bought and paid for debacle here.

      I used to have that “live and let live” attitude like Trapper dave. Not anymore. I look at every extreme high tech-guy and crossbow “hunter” as a complete traitor to bowhunting.

    • ReadyHawk
      Post count: 62

      Yeah, wanna know what the fashionable bow hunter would look like,,,open the Cabelas catalog.

    • rnorris
      Post count: 88

      Thanks for the breakdown of the catalog, by the way. I referenced this post on my blog this morning. Good work. You made some of us think.

    • bruc
      Member
      Post count: 476

      Traditional archery must be growing significantly!
      Considering four pages of trad gear in a Cabelas catalog, that were never there before, and countless custom bowyers. Tells me that the sport must be growing.
      I rough counted 55 bowyers this morning in THE magazine.
      Wonder what the percentage would be Trad compared to Compound ? Any ideas ?
      Bruce
      BTW there is only one TBM 😉

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      I just got a big fat Redhead hunting catalog, and it has NO trad bows or gear, period. Meanwhile, the new L.L. Bean hunting catalog has a “family archery set” of inexpensive, low-pounds take-down recurves … and NO wheelie junk much less X-guns. If I have to buy something from a big mail-order house, it will be L.L. Bean. But so far as finances and availability allow, I much much prefer to support the Ma and Pa outfits who are themselves trad folk, esp. those who advertise in TBM. It wasn’t Cabelas, Redhead or even Bean that brought traditional bowhunting back from the edge of the grave–it was TBM and the advertisers who support them. I feel morally obligated, and happily so, to return that support and keep it all in what truly is a family, including this website. The trad world is the only way I’ve ever been a “family man.” IMHO.

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      I don’t get into the gadgets a whole lot. I’m not going to preach to someone about the values of traditional archery and primitive hunting, or bore you to death with condescending remarks about compound bows and crossbows and the users while I run down into the woods to use my game cameras and feeders. I don’t use game cameras, feeders or licks either. I am not necessarily against them though.

      The ethics of hunting are highly debatable and everyone’s point of view is diverse. But I will say that I believe traditional archery is unique and the merits of this activity demand credit when someone is able to harvest their animal after hard work. I don’t use compounds and have never shot one in my life. Just doesn’t look like they were made for me.

      Cabelas simply does not have very many products I like. A miniscule amount in the archery section. Today people seem as if they are more focused on their clothing and equipment for hunting than they are about the experience and adventure. Does Cabelas breed this mentality? Partly so. They are a business and operate on business model for profit. Just like television, books, photos, magazines, websites and people in general.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Ray — You are right. Much of America, including Wall St., operates on the Cabela’s model of business. And we see what that has gained us. My specific arguments against Cabelas as in fact leading hunting in dangerously wrong and unethical if not immoral directions, aside from selling anything that’s even marginally legal anywhere, include them brokering “trophy dart hunts” for rhinos and elephants behind high fences in Africa, and buying up prime riverside fishing property in MT, which had always been open to public access, and developing them with trophy homes as high-end “trophy fly fishing properties” not open to the public. There is conscientious capitalism, which helped make America great, and there is pure self-serving greed and to hell with everyone and everything else, which greatly weakens us. The laissez-faire model of “let the other guy do what he wants so long as it’s legal” has never struck me as something sacrosanct and above criticism. If pointing these things out is “preaching,” so be it; I’ve always thought of it as necessary and I wish others were doing more of it so I wouldn’t have to. I can and do however happily accept your views as your views, without backing away from my own convictions. Cheers, Dave

    • SteveMcD
      Member
      Post count: 870

      Backcountry Joe wrote: The state of the hunting community is sad. The Trueblood days of Field and Streams are gone!

      Yes, Indeed! Tap’s Tips, The Old Man & the Boy, Burton Spiller.

      We are all of an earlier time. A better time. But as mentors and teachers we all have hidden agendas. So we have the opportunity to pass on what we believe is right.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Perhaps, but in just about any age there have been things to lament, ways in which it seemed like humanity had been sold out to the cheapest common denominator. Pining nostalgically for some idyllic period in the past that probably never actually existed seems a bit futile.

      I say live with a strong spirit, and with your core values held up proudly, in whatever age you happen to live in. I am a product of the present, and it’s 2011. I believe that the kind of crass commercialism we’re talking about here is bullshit. I try to live simply. I hunt with a trad bow because I love it, and because I believe it has always been a great avenue to open one up to all the rich details of the hunting experience, regardless of what century I happen to have popped out in. And I try not to get bogged down in all the peripheral silliness of wishing others thought like me. That’s their problem. They won’t be found where I hunt anyway.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Amen to supporting the Moms & Pops of the world. Many of us are in business for ourselves, too, and depend on the local support. I’m getting back into this archery after many years away and I’ve been able to get a lot of guidance, not only from this site, but from the business that advertise here. I owe them many thanks, especially Three Rivers, and my continued business.
      On a related note. When the Big C opened a store in central PA I thought I’d take a ride out there. My son, still in a stroller at the time, really loved the stuffed animals and the aquariums. That’s all cool, but the fun stopped there. I looked long and hard to find a product that was made on these shores and found darn little. You would think that at a flag wavers’ paradise like this is supposed to be, that you would find a little bit of the stars and stripes on some of the products. No such luck.

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      David Petersen wrote: Ray — You are right. Much of America, including Wall St., operates on the Cabela’s model of business. And we see what that has gained us. My specific arguments against Cabelas as in fact leading hunting in dangerously wrong and unethical if not immoral directions, aside from selling anything that’s even marginally legal anywhere, include them brokering “trophy dart hunts” for rhinos and elephants behind high fences in Africa, and buying up prime riverside fishing property in MT, which had always been open to public access, and developing them with trophy homes as high-end “trophy fly fishing properties” not open to the public. There is conscientious capitalism, which helped make America great, and there is pure self-serving greed and to hell with everyone and everything else, which greatly weakens us. The laissez-faire model of “let the other guy do what he wants so long as it’s legal” has never struck me as something sacrosanct and above criticism. If pointing these things out is “preaching,” so be it; I’ve always thought of it as necessary and I wish others were doing more of it so I wouldn’t have to. I can and do however happily accept your views as your views, without backing away from my own convictions. Cheers, Dave

      I cannot dispute much of what you say and would be in agreement with most of it. However I will point out a detail which is probably inaccurate. This kind of dabbles into politics but you offered the entry here. The term “laissez-fair” has been used in a fairly broad sense. However in America and probably the specific prime Montana riverside properties you speak of, I see no example of “laissez-faire” destruction. People simply cannot build whatever they want wherever they want anywhere in the United States.

      The more I look into that idea you present the more I see an class warfare argument which has a lot of potential to wander off topic. Rich people came in and bought up the land. With the aid of the rich corporations. While discussions on this matter inherently affect prime fishing spots, the connection to Cabelas in order to broker the deal doesn’t seem like a conflict with sportsmen. Cabelas is essentially brokering deals on property which is private. If people want to make private areas into public areas they need to work with their local governments on that. To simply blame it on corporate Cabelas is not really representative of the whole problem and doesn’t point out that people can collectively work together and organize better outcomes to some of these situations. If it wasn’t Cabelas it would be someone else. Perhaps someone from out of the country who intends to reap the profits and send them overseas. I am aware that in some people’s world, most any land is priceless and should be under complete control of the government. Not necessarily yours but this is a small example of that mentality.

      The fact is that there are going to be some things which we cannot control in our lives. While I might agree with the sorrows of losing access to public fishing areas I also will state that without presenting options and throwing stones at the people who bought or sold the land doesn’t seem like a solution to anything.

      I can think of at least 4 local government fiascos in recent years which have taken place with public land management. Some of which are more destructive (unintentionally so) than some people placing homes along a river. Including one example which contributed loads of pollution into the local lake, and right into a wetlands habitat. What we need is balance but I don’t subscribe to class warfare against would be homeowners or even the big bad coporations unless it is appropriate. I couldn’t tell you how much I appreciate the public access to the local lake we have here and how I wish there was more of it. I know the value of this as I live it year round.

      In addition, my statements are not intended to represent “if it’s legal it’s ok” in any way shape or form. It’s unclear why you would mention that so I must presume you are indicating that is my outlook or intended delivery. It’s not accurate. The statement does not seem to add to the discussion thus far. Perhaps you would like to expand on your use of these terms so we can understand your intent.

      I could go on further but I don’t really want to wander too far from the discussion for the moment. If you don’t like Cabelas, don’t buy their Chinese products.

    • bruc
      Member
      Post count: 476

      BRUC wrote: Traditional archery must be growing significantly!
      Considering four pages of trad gear in a Cabelas catalog, that were never there before, and countless custom bowyers. Tells me that the sport must be growing.
      I rough counted 55 bowyers this morning in THE magazine.
      Wonder what the percentage would be Trad compared to Compound ? Any ideas ?
      Bruce
      BTW there is only one TBM 😉

      I initiated the conversation merely mentioning that Trad Archery must be growing And I’m not sure by how much ? I wasn’t slammin Cabelas or anything else just curious about our growth ? My un-educated guess is 40-60 . 40 being Trads 🙄 Am I being optomistic:?:
      Bruce

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      I suppose that I was slamming Cabela’s. I shouldn’t single them out, as it’s hard to find things Made in USA pretty much anywhere. I don’t have anything against the Chinese people either, or any other nationality, race, religion, etc… Their politicians are probably just like ours, just trying to get theirs while they can. I’ve been around a little bit and am pretty sure that your average person on the street in any country, in any part of the world, is pretty much like me. I’m just trying to make a living and see my kids off the best way I can. My aim at the big box is just lamenting the fact that so many jobs and so much of our money is overseas. What we get in return is often of low quality. Our options are few these days.
      I would imagine that the growing interest in traditional archery is way to get away from the technology that we are surrounded by all day, the necessary and the unneeded. The values that we speak of are a way to get back a little sanity that we seem to be losing in other arenas.
      I should add that I’m no purest. I have purchased items from the big C and others, after finding out that I couldn’t get it at the local store. For my archery gear, I’ll stick with the places you find on this site and what I can get from craftsmen that I meet.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Ray– I can only repeat my conclusion: “I can and do however happily accept your views as your views, without backing away from my own convictions.” No amount of discussion is likely to change either of us on this issue, so I’ll leave the last word with you. Cheers, Dave

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      I’ll admit, Cabelas is a mildly interesting waste of time. I didn’t take anyones comments about Made in China as having racial intent and none of my remarks have racial intent. You have to describe a nation somehow. The fact is Cabelas doesn’t produce many items which I am jumping to buy. Neither do a lot of outdoors stores. A few fishing poles, a few arrows and bows is about all I need.

      As far as discussion and views changing, my intent is not to change someones view. I simply just dived down into the assertion that Cabelas ruined prime fishing access and it seemed to be missing some connecting content. In addition I also addressed the suggestive remarks that if you don’t have a strong opinion one way or the other on the matter then you were “if it’s legal, it’s ok”.

      If I was going to work on preservation of river access I would look into forming an organization which has clear goals and can raise money to purchase land , manage the land and make it available for public use permanently. There are organizations which do this sort of thing today. I bet Cabelas may even be willing to donate to some of these type of organizations.

      Anyway…

    • Homer
      Post count: 110

      Ahh, good on you both, Ray and Dave, for living up to my closing quote, below. 😀 Homer

    • hrhodes
      Post count: 31

      I ordered a bow from Herter’s back in the 70’s…. that was a great outfit. There were a few celebrity photos in it as I remember.. But I can’t see Fred Bear doing any “high fives” or big celebrations for the “Sportsman’s” Channel…

      Big difference in Trad Hunters and those guys. It is a moment of quiet reverance for me to approach a kill. A time for a mix of emotions, joy and some sadness. At the very least it requires a prayer for a departed friend that has played it’s part in this thing we call hunting.

      Of course, that’s just me. To each his own. If they want to sign up for a fashion show rather than a hunt and if they want to shoot deer with a ray gun or laser guided bomb and call it hunting, and it’s legal, hey, go for it. Not my style.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Ray,
      I appreciate your last post. Understood and appreciated. Thanks, dwc

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I LOVE, I repeat, LOVE these discussions! I think it is healthy and important that differences of opinion are heard and respected. And I love your signature quote Homer!

      Guess I’m in a loving mood tonight. 😆

    • George D. Stout
      Post count: 256

      Before we throw too many rocks at “cheap labor”, or even the Chinese, lets remember why companies use that labor and their products. We priced ourselves out of competition with our ridiculously high wages for workers….and subsequent sundry benefits. While auto workers were making six times what the average wage earner made, the cost of our goods skyrocketed over the years to keep up with those ever increasing wages/benefits. As a country, we made ourselves a non-entity in the manufacturing process…due to the greed of big unions and workers who wanted more without thought of consequence. The consequences are now.

      For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.:cry:

      Anyway, when I get a Cabelas catalog, it goes it the fire starter box for camping season. And not for reading.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      George, I think your comment about unions, etc. is also an excellent fire starter. 😆

      I don’t get the Cabela’s archery catalog because it doesn’t offer anything for me. I don’t like all of the technology in hunting, and never did…even when I was using a compound. But to deride Cabela’s for not having much, if any, traditional archery equipment, is akin to a compound shooter deriding 3Rivers for not having equipment for them. “traditional” bowhunting will never be mainstream, and Cabela’s is a mainstream retailer. Just my humble opinion.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Yes please, let’s not let this slip down into a debate on economics and international financial politics. This time of year, with all of us starting to feel the rut just ahead in our own bellies, we have a lot more and better things to talk about. I’ll try my best to follow my own advice too! 😛 dave

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Patrick wrote: But to deride Cabela’s for not having much, if any, traditional archery equipment, is akin to a compound shooter deriding 3Rivers for not having equipment for them. “traditional” bowhunting will never be mainstream, and Cabela’s is a mainstream retailer. Just my humble opinion.

      Despite agreeing with a number of the previous comments, I’d also have to agree with this. It’s kind of like lamenting that Cabela’s doesn’t carry bamboo fly rods and silk lines. The fact is, we’re an obscure niche of the sport, though 4 pages in a Cabela’s catalogue dedicated to trad supplies is certainly more than they had a few years ago, which indicates something. But ultimately, I’m fine with being part of an obscure niche. It seems to be an inherent part of most things I’ve been attracted to.

    • William WarrenWilliam Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      trapperDave wrote: those are called skeeter bait 😆

      Cabelas has a repellant for that……:D

    • Bounty Hunter
      Post count: 149

      donthomas wrote: (helped along by input and clout from groups ranging from industry associations to the NRA, which supports the introduction of crossbows into archery seasons.)

      That is why I’m no longer a member of the NRA or the Texas State Rifle Association. They both teamed up and pushed crossbows down our throats. It was only the Lone Star Bowhunters Assocation standing against crossbows and we won for a few years, but couldn’t hold out any longer against the big guns like the NRA and TSRA.

      As far as Bass Pro, Cabelas and the likes, I don’t go to their stores or order from their catelogs any more. Like stated before they have just gotten too big for their own pants and the only thing they really care about any more is what makes them the most money.

      I hate to see things go down the path they have, but I will say that today I am seeing more and more folks turning to traditional gear and that gives me some hope for the future.

    • GERALDTOMLIN
      Post count: 10

      Seems like I joined up with pretty traditional crowd when I signed up with traditonal bowhunter. Geez, I was surprised to hear that people would throw away a Cabela’s Catalogue!

      OK, OK I must agree that there is truely too much fancy junk on the pages for Compound bows and Crossbows. And really, very much overpriced junk….. but one man’s junk is another man’s dream. I’ve seen it happen that way so many times. I enjoy my compound bow almost as much as my two recurve bows, but the junk gadjets, i can’t understand.

      Now, for the rest of Cabela’s, Geez, all that fantastic outdoors stuff. wow, what’s wrong with that? camping fishint hiking, etc etc, wow!:D

    • Nate Bailey
      Post count: 101

      Backcountry Joe wrote: The state of the hunting community is sad. The Trueblood days of Field and Streams are gone!

      I usta read field and stream, loved it when i was a kid–won’t touch the mag now!

      As far as Cabela’s is concerned–I love my Alaknak tent and I do like some of my Cabelas clothes. I hate the idea of Crossbows during bow season, and atvs in places where they shouldnt be, but they are usefull to get you to the trailhead. Or should I say, wherever you would take your pickup to– as they get better miliage. I just bought a dual sport motorcycle (dirt/street), so I can get myself in the woods more, without burning 20 gallons of fuel, each time. let me stress–bikes, quads, and the like shouldn’t ever go where you wouldn’t take your pickup.

      The problem here isnt the stuff, its us, well not on this board, but society. That is why we need to support groups like PBS, and Backcountry Hunters– they stand in opposition to the perversion of human indulgence. In other words–if people were responsible and thoughtfull, there would be no need for such groups– I think the best medicine is, the medicine that is lived out in our daily lives, correcting people (most of all kids),comunicating, as most people, if they thought about it, would understand where we are coming from.
      just my 2 cents!

    • Nate Bailey
      Post count: 101

      David Petersen wrote: I just got a big fat Redhead hunting catalog, and it has NO trad bows or gear, period. Meanwhile, the new L.L. Bean hunting catalog has a “family archery set” of inexpensive, low-pounds take-down recurves … and NO wheelie junk much less X-guns. If I have to buy something from a big mail-order house, it will be L.L. Bean. But so far as finances and availability allow, I much much prefer to support the Ma and Pa outfits who are themselves trad folk, esp. those who advertise in TBM. It wasn’t Cabelas, Redhead or even Bean that brought traditional bowhunting back from the edge of the grave–it was TBM and the advertisers who support them. I feel morally obligated, and happily so, to return that support and keep it all in what truly is a family, including this website. The trad world is the only way I’ve ever been a “family man.” IMHO.

      YEP

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