Home Forums Bows and Equipment I got this old BOW

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    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      I won an old Ben Pearson recurve bow 62″ 50# on Ebay. There are no problems (very minor from age/storage marks) on top limb. I was told by the seller, the bow may be made in the late 60s; my winning bid $69.00 + $16.00 s/h. Is this bow safe to shoot being so old? If not, I still like having it! Remembering the old movies of Robin Hood in the 50s and the 60s.

    • David Bartlett
      Post count: 75

      I shoot my 67 & 1/2 Bear Super Kodiak almost daily. I say string it up and have some fun.

    • wojo14
      Post count: 325

      Heck ya!

      As long as there is no major stress marks in the limbs or warping.

      Shoot it!

      Enjoy!:D

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      David Bartlett wrote: I shoot my 67 & 1/2 Bear Super Kodiak almost daily. I say string it up and have some fun.

      Stringing it up, I have another question regarding string it up. Do you leave the string on your bow or do you remove it when storing it, say for a few days. I’ve ask this same question to a traditional archer and he said, leave the string on. His reasoning is, your compound bows you don’t take the string off of them, why would not leave it on your recurve bow. What do say?

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      One of my favorite bows is a mid sixties damon howatt monterey. Shoots great and I never unstring it. Just shoot it several times a week.

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      I had to take a break from shooting my 1958 Bear Kodiak to respond to this. Just kidding – it was my 1968 Bear Grizzly. Or maybe it was the custom selfbow made for my dad … in 1943.

      As noted above, if the bow is in good condition, there is no reason not to shoot it. The bows from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s will probably go on killing game long after we Boomers have passed from the scene.

      As for the strung/unstrung question, you’ll hear all sorts of opinions both ways, some occasionally taking pains to differentiate between longbows and recurves, selfbows and all other bows, etc., etc.

      I leave my fiberglass-laminate recurves strung. Until I get nervous about the weeks that have passed. Then I dither long enough to remember that the whole reason I have them is to shoot them, and it’s handier to keep them strung and I do more shooting that way. (Makes no sense, but there it is.) I do leave my selfbows unstrung. When the snow gets too deep in the winter for stumping, I unstring all of them. At least for a week or so …

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      eidsvolling wrote: I had to take a break from shooting my 1958 Bear Kodiak to respond to this. Just kidding – it was my 1968 Bear Grizzly. Or maybe it was the custom selfbow made for my dad … in 1943.

      As noted above, if the bow is in good condition, there is no reason not to shoot it. The bows from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s will probably go on killing game long after we Boomers have passed from the scene.

      As for the strung/unstrung question, you’ll hear all sorts of opinions both ways, some occasionally taking pains to differentiate between longbows and recurves, selfbows and all other bows, etc., etc.

      I leave my fiberglass-laminate recurves strung. Until I get nervous about the weeks that have passed. Then I dither long enough to remember that the whole reason I have them is to shoot them, and it’s handier to keep them strung and I do more shooting that way. (Makes no sense, but there it is.) I do leave my selfbows unstrung. When the snow gets too deep in the winter for stumping, I unstring all of them. At least for a week or so …

      I went and done just that, go and get that bow and shoot it! The handle on this Ben Pearson is very good, I got a Samick Sage recurve 62″ 40# that got me into traditional archery, the handle ok I can shoot it, but I like the Pearson much better. Thanks to All for your help!

    • David Fudala
      Post count: 224

      Nothing wrong with shooting old bows as long as they are still in good condition as far as I can tell? I’m opening this season with a ’66 Kodiak. Bear Archery does recommend not leaving a traditional bow strung for long periods of time. Remind your compound buddy that there is no wood in his bow.:wink:

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      dfudala wrote: Nothing wrong with shooting old bows as long as they are still in good condition as far as I can tell? I’m opening this season with a ’66 Kodiak. Bear Archery does recommend not leaving a traditional bow strung for long periods of time. Remind your compound buddy that there is no wood in his bow.:wink:

      Well, I had a very good day shooting, “I got this old Bow.” After reading all the information, I just had to shoot my old bow. I started at 15 yards, then 18 yards, finally I tried my hand at 30 yards. I did ok, but I now wanted to shoot from 10 yards; let the fun begin. I had a lot of fun just shooting my old bow. Trying to get the hang coming to anchor letting the arrow fly (snap shooting) is what I call it! I did very good, not all the time, but 7/8 times out of ten, the arrow would hit the mark. I’ve got targets three locations around my yard, so I’ll move around just shooting having fun; when you stop having fun shooting your bow, that’s when target panic comes; just too serious, and for me archery is therapy (PTSD) (Vietnam Vet) with disabilities from my years in the US Army (13 years). Thanks to ALL!

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      dfudala wrote: Nothing wrong with shooting old bows as long as they are still in good condition as far as I can tell? I’m opening this season with a ’66 Kodiak. Bear Archery does recommend not leaving a traditional bow strung for long periods of time. Remind your compound buddy that there is no wood in his bow.:wink:

      I forgot to said, the buddy wasn’t the one who said don’t leave the bow string on, it was Sportsman Warehouse employee (archery dept.) to remove the string. I ask my buddy advice about removing the string his thoughts about doing it. His reply was, “You don’t take your string off your compound do you?” Leaving the string on won’t do anything to your recurve bow. Just clarification whom said what! My buddy shoots only traditional archery. Thanks for your concern!

    • David Fudala
      Post count: 224

      Ya, wow! Sorry about that Ferdinand! I read that WAAAAY wrong! My bust:oops:

    • rferdinand
      Post count: 17

      dfudala wrote: Ya, wow! Sorry about that Ferdinand! I read that WAAAAY wrong! My bust:oops:

      No biggy! I should had said more who said what. While I was shooting, “I got this old Bow,” shooting the same length bows, it doesn’t mean that you’ll be able to shoot the same arrows in the two bows. Samick Sage, it like a shorter arrow, the Ben Pearson likes the longer arrows. I’m going to have to cut 5 arrows shorter for the Sage recurve bow; the unfletched arrow shafts(bare shaft tuning), the nock is to the left of the field point; weak spine. I believe that I need to cut about half inch off the shaft may be more!

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