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    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      [Some stuff about me. Feel free to comment or just skip to the next paragraph for the actual post/question.]

      Hello all. I am a late starter. I started hunting 3 years ago. Always wanted to, but could never find a mentor/partner/buddy/etc. Finally took the plunge and glad I did. I always wanted to archery hunt but I wound up starting with a rifle. I quickly realized that archery is where I need to be. I wound up purchasing a compound. I was attracted be all the bells and whistles. Looking back, it seems a bit dumb as I was getting into archery for the challenge and to simplify. Go figure. I happened upon my first issue of Trad Bow about a year later. It was the issue with Ishi on the cover. Everything in the magazine was what I was looking for in hunting. It was my values and ideals put into a publication. I read it cover to cover and loved every page. I must admit I was a bit saddened that I could not become a traditional bowhunter. This was because no one had ever given me a Bear Kodiak. Seriously, it seemed like every article started with “I took out the Bear Kodiak that my dad gave me when I was 12…”. OK, jokes aside, I know this is for me. I am hooked. I now have a recurve (InterNature TakeDown) that I got off an online auction. Never heard of it, but it seems like a quality bow. I was worried that I would not be able to hunt with it as I could not seem to get consistent hits, even at 10 yards. Again, thanks to Trad Bow for the last issue. I knew about the 3-under method of drawing but never got around to trying it. Finally, after reading the article, I forced myself to try it. It was amazing. I was still missing, but at least now, I was missing consistently.

      [The actual Post/Question]

      I would like to do a DIY archery Elk hunt in 2013. Are there any resources out there for DIY hunters? Pretty much, I just want to pack the Jeep, drive out to Colorado, walk into the woods and walk out a week later with a once in a lifetime experience (and maybe even an Elk). I just don’t see dropping several grand when I can accomplish it for the cost of gas and a license. I may not have the same odds, but the experience is guaranteed and that’s what counts for me. On those lines, am I correct in that archery licenses for elk are sold over the counter in CO and not on a lottery system? Anyway, all suggestions are welcome. I have a long way to go as I still need quite a bit of practice before taking the recurve out for any animal.

      Sorry for the long-windedness!

      Happy Hunting!!!

      Alex

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Hiya Alex, and welcome here. Yes, you can buy DIY for elk in most CO units, esp. on the West Slope, which I would recommend over the Front Range but maybe I’m biased. A bit over $500 for either sex elk, or half that for a cow tag. While I can’t think of any books on DIY elking, per se, there are lots of good books and articles on elk hunting, and TBM has over the years run at least a few DIY articles, which I’m sure Robin, our beloved Webmother, will soon provide links to here. Otherwise, it’s just camping and hunting. My first advice is always the same: talk to the FS and DOW folks in any area you’re considering hunting in, to find out where you can go to get away from the damned ATVs. Even a short backpack in to camp can make a huge difference in your experience and hunting luck. Later in the month is more pleasant and productive than early. Enjoy, Dave

    • bobtieken
      Post count: 10

      Idaho also has long OTC seasons for any elk.

    • Robin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 916

      Hi Alex, and welcome to the family. It sounds like you found the right place for meeting other traditional hunters and making new friends.

      Traditional Bowhunter® has published too many elk articles to list them all. We offer an index file in the Download Library. It is an Excel spreadsheet, and you can search and sort any way you like. The grayed-out titles are sold out issues, but those are available here to Premium Members. The other titles are available in printed back issues, which can be purchased by phone or through the Shopping Cart System. Please let me know if you need any help with the index file or the web site.

      Your new friend, David Petersen, has also written an excellent book about elk. You can purchase A Man Made of Elk from us or directly from Dave at http://www.davidpetersenbooks.com. 😆

      Take care,

      Robin

      “WebMother”

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      bobtieken wrote: Idaho also has long OTC seasons for any elk.

      Excellent advice, thank you. I thought of CO simply because it seems the closest to me (only a 24 hour drive). I would definitely love to go out to Idaho one day. I could also wait to get a tag from my home state of PA, but the chances of being struck by lightning on a cloudless day while wining the Powerball without ever having played are greater than getting one of those. So I will have to make the trip. Idaho was always on my list of places to go, even before I started hunting. Thanks for the reply.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      David Petersen wrote: Hiya Alex, and welcome here. Yes, you can buy DIY for elk in most CO units, esp. on the West Slope, which I would recommend over the Front Range but maybe I’m biased. A bit over $500 for either sex elk, or half that for a cow tag. While I can’t think of any books on DIY elking, per se, there are lots of good books and articles on elk hunting, and TBM has over the years run at least a few DIY articles, which I’m sure Robin, our beloved Webmother, will soon provide links to here. Otherwise, it’s just camping and hunting. My first advice is always the same: talk to the FS and DOW folks in any area you’re considering hunting in, to find out where you can go to get away from the damned ATVs. Even a short backpack in to camp can make a huge difference in your experience and hunting luck. Later in the month is more pleasant and productive than early. Enjoy, Dave

      Dave, thank you so much for the reply. I can’t even imagine a trip like this. To me, “roughing it” has long been a hotel that only had basic cable. Like I said, I am really new to hunting, let alone archery (and especially traditional archery). All I know is that I regret no starting much sooner. The more I think about it, the more nervous I get and the more I know I will have to do it. I still can’t believe I would even consider it, but reading stories (especially those in TBM) has me convinced that hunting out west, and especially for elk, is what I always pictured hunting as being like. The glassing, stalking, calling, climbing, being out of cell phone range and being truly a part of nature, not just in it are all things I wish Pennsylvania hunting was. Stand and blind hunting are ok, but I know there is more. Thanks for the advice.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      TBMADMIN wrote: Hi Alex, and welcome to the family. It sounds like you found the right place for meeting other traditional hunters and making new friends.

      Traditional Bowhunter® has published too many elk articles to list them all. We offer an index file in the Download Library. It is an Excel spreadsheet, and you can search and sort any way you like. The grayed-out titles are sold out issues, but those are available here to Premium Members. The other titles are available in printed back issues, which can be purchased by phone or through the Shopping Cart System. Please let me know if you need any help with the index file or the web site.

      Your new friend, David Petersen, has also written an excellent book about elk. You can purchase A Man Made of Elk from us or directly from Dave at http://www.davidpetersenbooks.com. 😆

      Take care,

      Robin

      “WebMother”

      Robin, thanks for the advice. Becoming a Premium Member is what got me into this crazy train of thought :D. I have been reading every TBM issue available online. It actually took me a while to get used to just how long TBM has been around. I was reading TBM season 1 issue 2 and saw something I was interested in. Naturally, the first thing I did was look for a web site. I was surprised not to find one. I was even more surprised when I could not find any. Then it hit me. This wasn’t an issue from last year. It was actually kind of funny, but at the same time informative. I look at some predictions made and see how time has proved them right or wrong. To be honest, it’s pretty cool. Thanks again for the reply.

    • skifrk
      Post count: 387

      If you have not done much camping beside motels, you might want to start and try with camping at the local state park as a starting point. While I am no expert on elk hunting in CO like Dave you are more than welcome to pick my brain about what items are needed and possible locations to look for them. Note this year if you come the west has been exceptionally lacking in rainfall. So the big thing to research for is water, specifically water at a source where it comes out of the ground such as a spring, in an OTC. Hope this helps.:D

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Post count: 300

      Alex

      Congrats My friend ❗

      You are embarking on what I am sure will become a lifelong passion….As someone who used to own an archery shop (admittedly a compound “speed pro shop”) in early 90’s and recently (2 years or so) switched to stickbows, I can only tell you it is ADDICTING…Haven’t picked up a wheel bow since. Couple that with the discovery of the joy, reverence and glory of the hunt (notice I didn’t say the kill) and you will be hooked…

      I can offer a bit of advice if I may…I’ve never been a “start small” kind of guy BUT, I would listen/read a lot of what the guys here have to say, especially Dave…He is not only exceedingly experienced in elk hunting but also in wilderness camping/survival etc…

      I would offer this, first, as to your archery skills, practice with a bow/setup that you shoot well and are comfortable with….When you feel like you’re there, practice somemore!

      An elk is a rather large animal, become familiar not only with it’s vitals etc but also, how to break one down once you have it on the ground, and how to pack it back to camp/out of the wild…definitely NOT something you want to learn on the fly….will make for a miserable/disappointing experince if all that meat/trophy goes to waste…

      You are embarking on a calling, not a hobby my friend….enjoy, learn, experience and it will soon be a part of your soul….I know it has for all of us here 😀

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Thank you all for your time and advice. This is definitely something I plan to do. I hope to be able to do it next year, but only time will tell. My biggest issue (as some of you predicted) is my lack of experience as a camper, and in dressing animals. I would consider it a great disrespect to any animal take not to use it to the fullest. I would hate to spoil the meat by not treating it properly. That is why I am reading up on it as much as I can and getting out there to practice (every aspect, not just the shooting). My last hurdle will be (I feel) the bow. I am shooting a 45# recurve. I think it is a little too “light” for an elk. This means I will eventually need to upgrade and then “re-learn” to shoot on the heavier bow before I go. I guess the good news it that I still have time. I have been on many an FTX in the army, I aced Land Nav (besides, I have a GPS) and I truly feel I have a passion for this. Only time will tell, but I feel good about it. Thank you all, again, for your time in replying.

    • strait-aero
      Post count: 350

      Alex, I suggest,and second our Webmother, Robin’s saying to read A Man Made of Elk by Dave Petersen, as it will show you the way you should approach the hunting of many animals, not just elk. Dave has had a lot of experience with ‘wapiti’ and other denizens of the wild.

      My own suggestion is that you get as much practical time as you can in shooting and hunting before tackling elk. I haven’t hunted them either so I’d be new to that game. Although, I am able to skin and dress out big game and have taken deer and other animals with the bow. Get proficient and start hunting sometning! Wayne

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Wayne-

      Thanks for the reply. The book is on order, I am just waiting for Mr. Petersen to get back from his trip so he can mail it. 😀 I agree with you completely. I have very minimal experince with field-dressing (I assisted, never did start to finish). Also, I have not yet taken any game with a bow of any kind. Only rifle. I hope to this year and with the way practice is going, I feel it may be the recurve. I look forward to the experience and can’t wait for the early archery season to start in September. Thanks again for the advice.

      Alex

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Alex — I’m home and all book orders went into the mail this morning. So far as field dressing elk and elk hunting in general, check out the CO Dept. of Parks and Wildlife website, which has both those topics on videos you can stream. In fact they have an entire “Online elk hunting university” course, free. It’s not exactly the way I handle elk but a real good primer. And while all the elk hunting is with rifle, you’ll still learn a lot. If don’t own a bugle, don’t buy one. If you do own a bugle, give it to someone you don’t like. 😛 Cow call very sparingly and hunt elk as you would whitetails (not including tree stands), have no great expectations beyond a nice camping trip in the Rockies, and you’ll have a “successful” hunt no matter what.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Can’t wait to get it. Thanks for the advice. This is definitely a work in progress. I think planning will be fun as I will get a chance to read and learn quite a bit. Beyond that, every hunt I have been on has been “successful”. I went out, I hunted, I came back. To me, taking an animal is not the measure of success. That’s why we call it hunting, not killing. 😀

      Thanks again,

      Alex

    • Amoose
      Post count: 80

      Seriously consider the undertaking of harvesting an Elk without help, they are large animals, you need a lot of equipment (game bags, knives, pack frames, cooler, etc.).. to take care of your animal,

      An awesome experience can turn into a nightmare when that Elk is laying in the deepest hole he can find, on his stomach, and trees and other brush keeping him there,

      Rolling over an animal of that size, then tieing his legs out of the way, or however you process him (or her?) and getting it all out of the woods requires 6 trips for me alone, any help is appreciated.

      I honestly feel that Elk hunting requires at least 2 people, one can do it, but he/she better know how to get the animal (meat/trophy/hide) out before it is worthless..

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Amoose,

      Point well taken. As a matter of fact, that is one of my biggest fears. I am almost more worried that I will be successful than I won’t be. I would not want to waste an animal because I am ill prepared. I definitely want to take as much time as I can and research the entire process. Afterwards, I might just decide that it is a bit too much for me. Also, I might just see if I can make any friends who are willing to o along. I originally wanted to look for a guide, but after looking at prices I figured I would take the chance of doing it on my own. Who knows? Like I said, it might be too much, or maybe I’ll go on a mini hunt for whitetail and build myself up. All I know is that elk is on my list of things to do, but then again so is moose, caribou, bear, hog, mule deer……

      😀

    • CarolinaBob
      Post count: 28

      1. What kind of shape are you in. since you stated 2013, then good get in the best shape of your life, if you are a flatlander, then twice the best shape of your life. 2. Are you a backpacker/camper. if not start now, think bows are expensive ha, good outdoor gear can be outasight, and anything for sleeping or shelter you find at Wallyworld is probably gonna be junk. So get a good sleep system and start in the back yard (allows you to bail if the weather turns bad or your equipment doesn’t work out.Decide what you are gonna eat, many good things to eat that only require hot water, learn how to bear bag your grub. 3. Learn how to shoot out to 30 yards, putting the first shot in the bulleye standing kneeling, sitting, from behind cover. The bow you have now is OK if you can shoot like I stated. 4. Learn first aid, broadheade and your knife should be shaving sharp. 5. Have fun, the first time you hear a elk bugle you will know what fun is.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      I’m actually not a flatlander. I live in a 3 story house. Seriously though, out here in eastern Pennsylvania, I see hills not mountains. I have been to Colorado to ski, so I have a feel for what I’m up for, but not ever having done it before, I am sure I am underestimating. I am glad you mentioned the camping aspect as well. I was hoping to use some of my OCIE from the army (sleeping bag, polypros, etc) but I would still need a tent and a backpack with frame. MREs would be the main staple, and I would need to make sure there is a water source nearby. Otherwise, I think it will be an adventure of a lifetime as so far my hunting consists of a few hours after work at a local farm I have permission to hunt. Thanks for the advice.

      Alex

      🙂

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Alex –

      There will be a trad archery rendezvous in your state next month, the Eastern Traditional Archery Festival:

      http://www.archeryfestivals.com/

      I’d highly recommend checking it out, if you can. Could be a great opportunity to try out a lot of different bows and talk to knowledgeable people.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Wow, that sounds great. Will definitely have to check it out. Thanks for the info.

      🙂

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Well, I have another dilemma. I am looking at the SW corner of CO for next year’s camping trip, AKA taking the bow for a walk. Problem is, with my luck, I may actually get a shot at something, or even actually get something. So there-in lies the dilemma. I am not as young as I used to be (like any of us are). I can spend the next year getting in shape, compiling equipment, saving money, etc. My wife is surprisingly for the idea. I guess the prospect of me being eaten by a bear or lion or coyote doesn’t phase her as it does me. 😆 Problem is, I wouldn’t mind that as much as I would winding up in a ditch. I tend to drive much longer that I should, and on a 7-day trip, I cannot see spending 4-5 of those days on the road. So I either try to drive it in as little time as I can, or I fly out. Monetarily, they are about equal. Advantage of driving is that I have my own vehicle and (again, knowing my luck) a way to bring back meat. Advantage of flying is it saves me a 29 hour road trip (again, not as young as I used to be) and gives me more time out in the field. So, any thoughts? Thanks again for all the input.

      Alex

      🙂

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Times like this you need a hunting partner, your wife may even enjoy the trip. A partner would also reduce some of the costs and work should you be fortunate.

      Good luck, Mark.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Mark,

      I absolutely agree. Problem with the wife is that she has no passion for the outdoors. Kids seem to be following suit, though it’s still to early to tell about the 4 year-old. Since I did not grow up hunting, I do not have many friends that hunt. It’s something I have wanted to do all my life, but never had anyone to go with or ask advice of (years before the internet).

      Another thing I was wondering of all the people who have traveled to hunt in Alaska, or somewhere far away, by plane is how do you get the meat (and/or trophy) back home? How much does it cost? Are there special shipping companies that handle this?

      Thank you all again for the help.

      Alex

      🙂

    • skifrk
      Post count: 387

      I have friends who go to Alaska for fishing a lot and what they do is vacuum seal the meat and flash freeze it in dry ice and then ship, I don’t know if that would work for you in the meat realm. If you have an idea of the nearest town to where you want to hunt, check and see if their are any m,eat processors in town that could help you with the shipping of your game. If you are coming solo and only have say 7 days to hunt total i would fly so I get more time hunting. Have you tried to find any archery clubs in your area that you could join, someone their might be willing to be your mentor.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      That might be a good idea. Gotta see if I can find one around Durango. 😀 I belong to an archery club, but it is mostly compound. I am going to join PA TradBow. Might make some contacts/friends/nemtors. Thanks for the reply.

      Alex

      🙂

    • vajd
      Post count: 29

      I fly every year, thats why I got a take down bow. I have thought about flying into Durango getting a cab to town. Stay near the Durango Silverton Railway, they have a ticket where they will drop you off and pick you up days later if you wait by the tracks. I have not done this! I always rented a truck, but thought it would be fun.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Now that sounds like something I would love to try. Planes, trains and automobiles. Love it. I have to look that up online, see if there is any info. I also have to find a place in Durango to get my license. Otherwise, I will try to plan for San Juan. Still not sure about the meat. I might have to look at Bing for some processors in the area. Anyway, thatnks for the heads up. Getting more and more excited each day.

      Alex

      🙂

    • Amoose
      Post count: 80

      I know that we found out years ago when a guy from PA shot an elk at our camp that shipping through a seafood company was cheaper than other options, but probably not many seafood companies around where you are hunting…?

      LOL

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      True, but…

      If I am not looking to drive, that opens quite a bit up for me. My dream (after I win the lottery and become president…) is to hunt my own back yard in Alaska. Until then, I just want to visit these places I have been reading so much about, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico, etc. I originally posted that Colorado was my choice because tags are available over the counter and I could drive there, but now I am wondering. As I started getting replies and thinking about it even more seriously I am paying attention to things a bit more, i.e. how winded I get walking a half mile to put up my stand, how a 2 hour drive takes more of a toll on me than it used to, etc. So I have to think practicality and not just “I’m gonna go out an do it”. Lots to think about, but lots of great advice. Hope it keeps coming.

      Alex

      🙂

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Durango has no game meat processors I know of. However nearby Pagosa Springs does, and maybe other nearby small towns. Unless you’ve won the lottery I can assure you it’s outrageously expensive to have meat processed, frozen and FedExed across the country. A couple of times I’ve shipped meat for a NY friend who hunts here with me most years, and to send just 30 pounds was over $200. An average young bull or mature cow will produce maybe 130 pounds of boned meat, not counting neck or rib meat or internal organs. A solo fly-in elk hunt is a rare critter indeed. Almost all nonresidents team up and drive out, splitting the driving and gas costs, then have a way to get their meat home. Something to consider.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Definitely food for thought. Will have to consider many things. Looking at back packs. Still trying to decide on volume. Looking at tents. Counting my MREs. All the fun stuff. Starting to think it’s much harder than I origianlly planned. Can’t wait for the timber frame home in Alaska. 😀 Any suggestions on where to hop off the train? I like the prospect of looking for a small local spring in the woods and setting up on it, maybe even camping near it. Close satelite images might help here. Chances are, I’ll go nuts just planning, but if I don’t, as long as I bring enough TP, I should be OK. I was hoping not to have to “Make Friends”. That’s a last resort. 😆

      Alex

      🙂

    • vajd
      Post count: 29

      I’ve told other guys that if they dream of going and keep putting if of it will never happen.

      I tell them to pick an area with alot of public land and over the counter tags. Fly out and go camping and scouting first. Just bring a camera and save money on the tag.

      If your unsuccesfull in finding elk or the terrain is to physical your not out much cash. If you do find elk, you could have your bow/arrows ect. shipped nextday air to you, and buy a tag, and head back into the wilderness and hunt.

      I have yet to kill a bull elk (buck fever on the first bull I ever saw, a foot over his back @25yds) but my pal Paul has killed 3, I have passed up some cows due to the cost of shipping.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      I couldn’t agree more. I would like to hunt the country, but Elk is my ultimate trip. I would like to give it a try and I’m not getting any younger. I actually would like to hear a bugle on something other than the TV. Everything else is gravy. I wouldn’t mind the meat, but I am not expecting much. Bull or cow never mattered much. I wouldn’t pass on a bull, but I definitely wouldn’t pass 10 nice-sized cows hoping for some horns. So that is where I am at now. No telling what will happen, but I totally agree that for many “tomorrow never comes”. Thanks to everyone for the advice.

      Alex

      🙂

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