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    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      Everybody has a hobby or two.  Don’t they?

      I’ve got more hobbies than I need.  Photography is one.  I am the track photographer where my daughter raced BMX (bicycle motocross).  She lives in Topeka now so it’s a 3 hour drive there.  I go instead to Pryor, Ok where my friends operate a track to shoot pictures at there.

      Woodworking, making game calls and assorted items.

      Building my own archery equipment is another hobby.  I’ve been chasing arrows for 55 years now and started building selfbows and laminated bows for about 18 years now.  One thing I haven’t done is build a take-down bow so snowed in boredom got me started on that.

      I built the form and bought a set of Flame Maple Burl laminations.  I went to a semi-local wood shop to buy some Huntsman TDR 1100-11 epoxy.  I had been using Smooth-On epoxy but after reading several bowyer stories of it having glue failures I decided to give Huntsman a try.

      While there I made the mistake of looking through their laminations spotted the Flame Maples.  I usually make my own laminations for my bows but these had to come home with me.

      Bow press and laminations laid out in order of assembly.

      It’s kind of hard to take pictures of the process while spreading glue and laying everything together.  The hard part is not getting everything within arms reach stuck to your fingers.

      Next is airing up the hose to 80#’s and checking everything as air is added and then into the old hot box at 160*.

      I read through the spec sheet for the Huntsman and it’s cure time is a lot less than the Smooth-On.  I left it in the box for 2.5 hrs just in case.

      So far so good.  I’ll let it sit overnight and then sand down the edges tomorrow.  Those glue boogers can be very sharp.  After sanding the edges on this limb I’ll start gluing up limb #2.  Not sure what woods to use on the riser yet.

      This is the grain near the tip of the limb.  I haven’t uncovered the burl.  I’ll get to see that after I draw out the centerline and sand the limb profile.  Stay tuned.

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 250

      Ha !!!1 …………….. Wait ’til you retire; ……… you’ll ask yourself how you ever had time to work !!!!

      Totally cool on the bow build. I’ve wanted to but am still trying to build the perfect arrow. …….. and a few other things.

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      I’ve been retired for three years now Richard.

    • richard roop
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      Post count: 250

      And let me guess …………………… You’re busier now than when you were working !!!!

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      I pulled up the spec sheet on Huntsman epoxy and it cures faster than the Smooth-On I have been using so I pulled the limb out of the hot box after 2.5 hrs.  That was a little longer than needed.

      I took the form apart to see how well everything had stayed in place.  Laminations do shift sometimes so it’s a relief when everything is still in line.

      The epoxy that is squeezed out can be as sharp as glass so you handle the limb with care until you get it sanded off.  After sanding the fiberglass laminations are still a little rough so you make sure you don’t slide your hand on them or you will pick up small splinters.

      Sneak peek after sanding all the glue boogers off the sides.

      Back.

      Belly

      Next I strip off all the painters tape and check the glass.  Then I retape both sides and mark the centerline in the back of the limb.  The tape is pretty tough to remove after baking so I use a plastic putty knife to help get it off.  I used masking tape on the first bow I made and it was terrible to remove.

      Draw the limb shape on the tape and it is ready to sand down.

       

       

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Aeronut

      That flame maple lamination is just the ” bees knees”

      Looking good …can’t wait to see it finished..

      Scout aka Ray

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      Hit the sander today and got the limb shaped to form.  Looks more like a bow limb now.  Now I have to make another one just like it..

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      I’m glad another of my hobbies didn’t freeze during our – 15* nights.  My bees are showing up at the feeder.  Not in great numbers but they are showing up so there’s hope for this coming season.

    • aeronut
      Member
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      Post count: 198

      Limb #2 assembled and in the hot box.

       

    • richard roop
      Member
      Post count: 250

      Fascinating to see the bow build !!!

      Please keep ’em coming.

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      Limb #2 out of the hotbox and ready for initial sanding.

      I ordered a piece of Jatoba wood to use for the riser.  I’m going to add a Hickory accent stripe in it.

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      One thing that has been a problem for me on laminate bows is sometimes the glue line at the fade has small gaps.  None have been bad enough to scrap a bow but they look bad.  The glue lines on these fades came out perfect.

      To drill the holes in the limb butts and riser you need a jig to make sure everything lines up.  These jigs can cost $65 or more.  I was lucky enough where I worked that we had a full machine shop.  I made this jig out of steel from the scrap bin and my only cost was for the four screws.

      Work has stopped for now because I need a new sanding belt for my sander.  The one in use now is my last belt and it is getting worn enough it is starting to burn the Bubinga wedge.

    • aeronut
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      Post count: 198

      I picked up a new belt yesterday at Home Depot so I was able to rough out limb #2.  Now to drill the limb for the mounting hardware and add some antler tip overlays.  I haven’t decided to use deer or Caribou antler.

      Looks a whole lot like the first one.

      #2 is on the left.  I really like these Flame Maple veneers.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Aeronut

      Looking good. Love that Flame Maple !

      Scout aka Ray

    • aeronut
      Member
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      Post count: 198

      Decided to go with deer antler tips on a piece of Tiger Maple.

      Cutting and sanding down some antler from a long dead Texas deer.  Now my shop stinks.

    • aeronut
      Member
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      Post count: 198

      The tips are sanded down to rough shape and all that is left cutting the string nocks and final shaping of them.

      I also set up the limb drilling jig and drilled the pin and bolt holes in the limbs.  I probably quadruple checked this before even getting the drill bit chucked up.   This is not a time to goof up.

    • aeronut
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 198

      My Jatoba riser wood was delivered this morning so I laid out the riser shape on it.

      Then marked the cut line for the accent stripes.  I’m going to use two strips of Maple with a black dyed strip sandwiched between them.

      Meanwhile I have another project in the works.  I bought a knife blade blank and am going to put stabilized Spalted Elm scales on it.  They are in the vacuum chamber soaking up Cactus Juice and will stay there overnight and then get baked tomorrow.

    • aeronut
      Member
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      Post count: 198

      After soaking up the Cactus Juice I wrap the wood in a thick layer of aluminum foil and bake it in a toaster oven for 2 hrs at 200-210*.

      After cooling down and unwrapping.  The resin is cured hard and the rough edges are very sharp.  They are ready to be sanded down.

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