Home Forums Campfire Forum High Camp

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • George McCloskey
      Member
      Post count: 55

      I’d like to open a thread on high country base camps and bow hunting.
      For the last 5-6 years I’ve headed into the Pioneer Range of Idaho on foot, often reaching 9,000+ feet by midday, only to have to start down at about 4pm to get to the truck by nightfall. This year I’ll be backpacking up to a base camp to be in-country for a morning and evening hunt (thanks Dave for the advice in your writing).
      Can the members on this forum share what has worked for them regarding food, shelter, etc? It often goes from 80 degrees to zero with blowing snow in an afternoon – depending on what the weather decides as many of you have experienced. I’ll be looking to spend about 4 nights in God’s country. I’ve backpacked as a young adult and have light tackle, but always seem to pack too much. I will bring some Crown Royal so add 2 pounds to my pack before you share how I can save weight.

    • purehunter
      Post count: 63

      Are you in San Franscico? Hey, get a D-6 tag and we can hunt the Sierras so we can “practice” the back pack hunts. Going to Colorado myself…….anyway, I use clothing of lightweight layers to adjust to the temps, always carry a beanie. I lay everything out several weeks prior that goes into the pack and try to make sure it is REALLY needed. I even go one item at a time to do that. Use a flask, it can save weight. Headlamp, no flashlight.

      Make your gear do mulitple tasks if at all possible. There was a thread a little while ago on backpack hunts that had a lot of replies. Good stuff in that thread. My pack for four days in that kind of weather/country is about 36 or so pounds with one water bladder full. I like Mountain House food and its light and works with my stomach. MRE’s are good but heavy. I admit to taking some comfort food (ie good tasting) along, like candy bars. Lots of hot drink mix/broth. I’ve found a good hot drink does wonders when its been hot all day, then really cool/cold when the sun goes down and you start to shiver and pull on ALL your layers.

      Have fun and good luck!

      Craig

    • Homer
      Post count: 110

      There was a long thread on backpacking hunting here not that long ago, which probably contains most of what all of us with experience have to say on the topic, which may be why you’re not getting a big response here (so far). If I could find it for you I would, but I can barely find my eyeglasses.:oops: There was a lot of good info in that thread, as I recall. My biggest concern about backpack hunting is that you have to carry the meat out, if you get lucky, along with all that backpack gear which is an extra trip. With elk or moose or bear, that can be near impossible. So as I age I’ve learnt to keep my backpack hunts reasonably short, just far enough to get away from the mobs and into undisturbed country. I do like the being-aloneness of it.

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      Here’s the other thread: backpack hunts

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Thanks, Charles — you beat me to it! 😳 Dave

    • George McCloskey
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 55

      Thanks all for the comments and link to the prior posts. I’ll check ’em.

    • George McCloskey
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 55

      Make your gear do mulitple tasks if at all possible.

      Thanks Craig. I think that this is one of the keys to going as light as practical.

    • FUBAR
      Member
      Post count: 252

      Just got back from backpacking and the wife had gotten me something new to try for dinners. At the grocery store she found a box of instant potatoes. There is 4 different flavors and they come in small pouches. They are real simple. Bring 1/2 cup water to boil, add packet, let sit a few minutes. I cut up and added a beef stick to the 4 cheese taters and it was delicious and filling. Would be real good on a cold evening

    • Charles Ek
      Moderator
      Post count: 563

      I’ve been using these Idahoan brand instant potatoes for some time, both in camp and at home. They’re very good in all flavors and relatively light to carry at just over four ounces per package.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      A good sleeping bag with separate waterproof outer, there is nothing worse than a bad nights sleep after a tiring day.
      A change of footwear around camp, pack everything into dry bags, if you use a camel back or similar take a repair kit.
      Tabasco.
      Rice and dried meat, cant go wrong.
      Handline for fishing.
      Krill light or similar, if you’ve ever lost a camp in the dark you’ll know why.
      Petroleum jelly/Vaseline, fire lighter, lip balm and lube.
      If you need a plate, stainless steel cat food bowls have steep sides to stop dinner escaping and are easy to keep clean.
      Chess set or cards if you have a partner.

      PS. Forgot the most important thing, a sense of humour.

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.