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    • shaneharley
      Post count: 118

      So besides keeping your bow arm strong does anyone here try to get in shape before hunting season and what do you do? What’s your focus?

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      ShaneHarley wrote: So besides keeping your bow arm strong does anyone here try to get in shape before hunting season and what do you do? What’s your focus?

      I try to maintain a certain level of fitness year around. My “go to” exercise is running.

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      Traditional calisthenics, push-ups pull-ups sit ups and squat, yoga, and hiking for me.

    • WyoStillhunter
      Post count: 87

      If I keep up with my post-double bypass routine I am good to go for hunting: aerobics, light weights workout, and careful diet. My biggest challenge as I approach 67 years old is loss of flexibility. The last couple of years have really brought that to the top of the list.

    • Steve Capps
      Post count: 85

      I walk and use one of those archery specific stretch band gadgets daily to reinforce muscle memory.

    • paleoman
      Member
      Post count: 918

      I walk miles of utility line right of ways every week, so that keeps me from being a hog from all the unnecessary calories I consume. I try to do 100 push ups a day too but get lazy sometimes.

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      I have a very active job, but I try to run at least 20 miles a week year round, as well as mix in some weight lifting and swimming. Swimming is probably the best thing anybody can do for their body IMO.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      I’ve been getting in shape for the past 20 years. Just keep in mind, “round” is a shape. I think I need to stop doing beer-curls and start on a bit of endurance. I need to drop about 50#. Archery is actually helpful there. I take the bow for a walk on the 3D course and that puts about 1-2 miles on the footwear. Do that 2X/WK, some jogging (2-3 miles), sign up for a few 5K races (just to run, not to place). Also, doing the “Tough Mudder” June 1st. 10-12 miles with obstacles. I just hope not to have an MI at mile marker 2 πŸ˜† . That’s about all. End of September will be the test. My first hunt in the “real” wilderness. Any QC hunters want to give me ideas on “training up”, feel free. Be well.

      Alex

      πŸ˜›

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      If there are two things I’m really poor at, it’s sticking to a regimen, and working out for the sake of working out.

      So instead I just try to do lots of stuff outdoors on a regular basis, year-round – hiking, mtn. biking, xc-skiing, etc. And I live at 6200′ which I think helps.

    • coastalbendbows
      Post count: 120

      I stay in shape with Olympic weightlifting. I’ll be 41 in a month and still compete Both my older kids lift. We all enjoy it.

      Closer to season I do crossfit.

      Shawn

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Zombieland Rule #1: Cardio.

      The fittest all rounders I have met are fellas that do 2 sessions a day, morning is cardio (running one day, swimming the next) afternoon is a split strength sessions (one day is chest, next is back, next is legs so on and so forth). That is awfully time consuming.

      The guys who I think get the most bang for their buck in terms of time invested are those that do crossfit. Crossfit is just short duration, high intensity circuits.

      If you watched my video about learning to shoot my long bow you know I’ve gotten pretty fat and sloppy doing virtually nothing for the last several months but I think cardio and endurance for your legs and core are the keys to preparing for fatiguing tasks like hiking/hunting, especially if you’re doing pack work.

      All that being said, I know a few big fat fella’s who are better hunters than me. Zombieland also offers this gem as a counterthought: “I don’t believe in it. You ever see a lion limber up before it takes down a gazelle?” Haha, love that movie πŸ˜€

      Jim

    • grumpygrumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      I spent 15 years repairing slate roofs (wanted to climb mtns for a living, but the pay isn’t as good). If you can do ballet, 40 feet in the air hanging on a rope, with 20 lbs of tools, and 30 lbs of slate, Physical fitness is a irrelevant. Right now I’m getting physical therapy for the muscles, I abused, and seeing a arthritis specialist. They are telling my right arm biceps will be fixed in June, or off to the more invasive stuff. Not so sure that is viable at 63. I lifted weights in high school, but have always gotten enough exercise doing dumb things as an adult. I may have to change that. :(:(:(Loose muscle tone faster as you get old, and it is harder to get it back. Never expected to live past 30.

    • grumpygrumpy
      Member
      Post count: 962

      I spent 15 years repairing slate roofs (wanted to climb mtns for a living, but the pay isn’t as good). If you can do ballet, 40 feet in the air hanging on a rope, with 20 lbs of tools, and 30 lbs of slate, Physical fitness is a irrelevant. Right now I’m getting physical therapy for the muscles, I abused, and seeing a arthritis specialist. They are telling my right arm biceps will be fixed in June, or off to the more invasive stuff. Not so sure that is viable at 63. I lifted weights in high school, but have always gotten enough exercise doing dumb things as an adult. I may have to change that. :(:(:(Loose muscle tone faster as you get old, and it is harder to get it back. Never expected to live past 30.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      I do a routine of a mixture of weights and cardio 4-5 times a week for 90 minutes or so. I be perfectly happy to maintain at 68.

      I guess table exercises don’t count here πŸ˜†

      I have had an inguinal hernia come up however and going to doc tomorrow. My best laid plans may be put on hold for awhile I suppose.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      I’d like to run, but my running style or lack of is a punishment. So I spend time walking in the woods, stumping. I also try to keep a routine of pushups and work with the bowfit. That’s a great exercise tool and it packs for travel as needed, too. I also split all my firewood with a six pound maul. All that helps me try to keep up with the kids. dwc

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      ausjim wrote: Zombieland Rule #1: Cardio.

      ….Haha, love that movie πŸ˜€

      Jim

      And don’t forget Rule #31 – Always check the back seat. 8)

      I love that movie too.

      Back on topic, I’ve been thinking of picking up a bowfit, but always wondered if they were worth it. Sounds like folks on this thread who use them think so, so I might pick one up.

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Smith,

      I’ve gone back and forth about the bow machine and the Chuck Norris one. I honestly would lean towards chuck as it’s a space saver, but I actually wound up doing none of the above. Granted, I am not the person who should be giving fitness advice, but there is a difference between knowing and doing (I knew smoking was bad for me all 25 years that I smoked). I honestly am becoming a big advocate of the “simple” fitness route. One, incorporate fitness into your daily routine (walk the steps, park in the last spot, just not at night, etc). Then, find activities that are exercise disguised as fun (several people here already mentioned skiing, walking the woods, etc). Next, replace some of your machines (walk or bike when you would have driven, chop wood and split it by hand instead of using a splitter, etc). Lastly, use the be best and most natural exercise aid available, gravity. Run, do pushups, situps, do some curls with some paint buckets, do pullups on a tree branch. The biggest issue with this is time, but if you are willing to invest it, the rewards will be great.

      One caveat is diet. 2 terms will never steer you wrong: “well-balanced” and “local”. Just as an example, you need to spend an hour on a treadmill at a moderately fast pace to work off a 6-pack of cheap beer. If you get an real beer, don’t make plans for the rest of the night. Ergo, sometimes it’s just a whole lot easier to push away from the table than to try and work off the excess. IMHO, of course. Any tool will work, so long as you use it. So no matter which route you go, stick with it. Be well.

      Alex

      πŸ˜€

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      You’re right, Alex, and who am I kidding, given my post above? I’m sure that in the end, I’ll just stick to what I’m already doing – shooting my bow a lot, trying to eat well (but good beer is non-negotiable….)and staying generally active at altitude. I need another “thneed” like a need a whole in the head. πŸ˜‰

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      I’m with DWC. I chop eleven cords of firewood a year with my 8# Snow & Nealley maul. Six for my family and five for my in-laws. Other than that I run, which is purely recreational for me so it doesn’t really seem like working out. Given my moderately active lifestyle, I don’t worry about getting in shape for hunting season. But, then, my hunting doesn’t entail packing 250lbs of elk over several miles of mountain terrain. May be different for folks who do.

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      Getting in shape….eesh…sounds like a lot of work. LOL! Honestly, I know I need to drop some weight. I’m at about 230, right now. I could do to lose 25-30, though according to some of the various “models” available online, I should be down anywhere from 155 to 195 pounds. The 195 seems pretty reasonable, but to get there would be the chore. I don’t know that I actually have that much weight to lose. I am sure over the last 10 years or so of building fence, I have gained enough muscle mass that I would have to lose some of that in order to get my weight where the “professionals” say it should be. If I got back down around 210, even I would be happy with myself. What to do. My first preference would be to find a cheap bike I can ride to and from work. It’s only 5 1/2 miles, and I used to cover 6 1/2 with some hills in less than 1/2 hour. All the riding down here would be basically flat, except the two little creeks I cross. And the uphill on both of those is barely enough to worry about…10 to fifteen feet of elevation change over 50 yards or so? That’s my first step, aside from trying to eat better overall. More fruits and vegetables during the day, healtier food for breakfast (when I have time for breakfast), and more water and less sugary drinks. Anyway, those are my half-hashed thoughts on the matter. LOL!!

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 413

      like smith said – I’m not much on working out but I hike , bike , ski,camp anything except pump iron. Last night I hiked looking for mushrooms even though it is early and dry , saw a nice rubber boa constrictor – big fun . I like to exercise as long as nobody calls it working out and of course there is always cold beverage.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      lyagooshka wrote: I’ve been getting in shape for the past 20 years. Just keep in mind, “round” is a shape. I think I need to stop doing beer-curls and start on a bit of endurance. I need to drop about 50#. Archery is actually helpful there. I take the bow for a walk on the 3D course and that puts about 1-2 miles on the footwear. Do that 2X/WK, some jogging (2-3 miles), sign up for a few 5K races (just to run, not to place). Also, doing the “Tough Mudder” June 1st. 10-12 miles with obstacles. I just hope not to have an MI at mile marker 2 πŸ˜† . That’s about all. End of September will be the test. My first hunt in the “real” wilderness. Any QC hunters want to give me ideas on “training up”, feel free. Be well.

      Alex

      πŸ˜›

      Awesome on the Tough Mudder Alex! Been thinking of doing the local Spartan Race here, but need to look for my big boy underpants!!

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Like many others around here I’ve topped the hill and am now on the downhill side (pushing 60 real hard).

      I’ve had four stints put in and do my best to keep in so sort of shape other than round.

      I walk (can’t run knees are shot), work outside as much as possible, spit wood each year for the winter and push away from the table when I’ve had enough rather than trying to make sure leftover aren’t put in the fridge.

      The best excuse I’ve found for all my health problems stems from being rasied in the south (everythings fried down there).

      Gave up smoking my pipe afew years ago. Gave up the cowboy killers over twenty years ago.

      Still, I have dreams of chasing mtn. lion one day. If I ever know it’s going to happen I guess I’ll have to give up making sure this recliner doesn’t wonder off and really get into a workout retine.:D

      Troy

    • Bunyan Morris
      Member
      Post count: 135

      I exercise regularly. Running/biking, push ups, sit ups, pull ups.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      When I’m into serious upper-body strength training, like now, I increase the weight from American pints to British pints and double the reps in my daily bow-arm-curling workout. I’m so gung-ho on staying in top shape that I even continue my grueling daily workout when I’m gone hunting. It helps! πŸ˜†

      attached file
    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      sinawalli,

      I still haven’t found my big boy underpants. What I usually do is check the calenday, if I am free, I say “to heck with it” and sign up. I try to con some friends into it as well. That way, I am pretty much forced to do it, and since I don’t want to look like a complete shlub and get carried off the track, I actually train, though not as much as I should. If I had to pay the day of the race, I would probably never run one. I am missing the Spartan Race this year. I will be away. Maybe next year. Now get out there and train. πŸ˜† Be well.

      Alex

      πŸ˜€

    • lyagooshka
      Post count: 600

      Dave,

      Just a little fitness advice: remember it’s quaLITY not quaNTITY. πŸ˜‰

      Be well,

      Alex

      πŸ˜€

    • ArrwSlngnArtist
      Post count: 3

      I just turned thirty around the end of April and have been exercising regularly for the last seven years, ran my first Tough Mudder last September and even finished it within two hours, but this year I’m aiming to finish the Mudder in an hour and a half.

      Four years ago, I was having horrible and often times, debilitating stomach pains to which no doctor could tell why this was happening to me. Eventually I was informed that the cause was food allergies and since then, I have been on a strict diet plan. Before this was all figured out though, my doctor told me to hold off on the gym and that crushed me, as I was use to going daily.

      But the woman I was dating at the time introduced me to yoga and proper stretching and that started my gradual return to training. Once my diet issues were figured out, I began exercising again and slowly developed my own routine. Never have I wanted to be Ah-nold big, but growing up Batman was my idol (yeah yeah, he’s a comic character I know) and he believes in training your entire body.

      After years of trail and error, I’ve figured out what works for my body and how to go about training it. So now I begin every gym trip with fifteen to twenty minutes of stretching (which if you Zombieland lovers saw, even Tallahassee took to stretching), I even stretch my feet as I wear those Vibram toes shoes. Then I follow that with three upper body exercises, usually arms and shoulders; leading into two core strength training exercises and then one or two heavy leg workouts, resting a minute or two between each set. After the legs I do two more upper body workouts and then a full out ab killer ecersise that usually leaves me a little breathless. Back to arms and shoulders for two more rounds, one last medium leg exercise and the big finish, a different ab killer.

      While resting, concentrate on bringing your breathing into check and slowing down your heart rate, so you don’t burn out thirty or forty minutes into the routine. Plus drink plenty of water, I’m not talking about three glasses a day, suck the stuff down as if your life depends on it, because it does. Remaining hydrated throughout the day is essential to your body functioning at its best.

      I also run two to three times a week, between three to seven miles and never on a treadmill, I hate those damn things. Mountain trails, paved paths, the side of the road, it doesn’t matter so long as you’re getting that all important cardio in.

      Of course none of this means a hill of beans if you don’t eat correctly and fast food doesn’t count people! Protein is a workout nuts best friend, be sure to eat enough in order to rebuild the muscles that you’re breaking down while exercising. Lots of fruits, veggies, pork, fish and rice make up my diet, I haven’t taken enough game yet to factor in its pro and cons, but once I finish training my dad (he is on the recovery path from neck surgery currently) for this hunting season, I intend to catalogue what works for us.

      Speaking of hunting, I only have one day a week to practice with my beloved recurve, but I make the most of it. Usually shooting until my hand goes numb, my dad comes down and asks for help (he has an area for shooting at his place) or the rain sets in. I’ve been researching different cultures shooting techniques and have been sandwiching together what works for me, hopefully this season I’ll be able to take down my first big game animal.

      Well I hope this was informative and helpful to those that need it and I look forward to any feed back.

      Happy training for the upcoming season!

    • wideangle
      Member
      Post count: 35

      I hit the weight room all year and cycle through endurance and strength building (squats, presses, pull ups etc)rotations. I also swim and ride my bikes. 90 days before opening day I start to add in hikes that are increasingly diffucult.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      David Petersen wrote: When I’m into serious upper-body strength training, like now, I increase the weight from American pints to British pints and double the reps in my daily bow-arm-curling workout…:lol:

      Dave –

      I’m curious – do you pay attention to specific gravity with your pint lifting as well? I now personally, I’ve found Imperial Stouts and Scotch Ales, for example, help me achieve my peak threshold a lot quicker….

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Smithhammer wrote: [quote=David Petersen]When I’m into serious upper-body strength training, like now, I increase the weight from American pints to British pints and double the reps in my daily bow-arm-curling workout…:lol:

      Dave –

      I’m curious – do you pay attention to specific gravity with your pint lifting as well? I now personally, I’ve found Imperial Stouts and Scotch Ales, for example, help me achieve my peak threshold a lot quicker….

      You guys are living in the past with your heads stuck in the sand. I know it’s counter intuitive but the densest lifting beverages are those with the most dissolved sugar and least alcohol. Real men lift schnapps. I like butterscotch. Man up.

    • T Downing
      Member
      Post count: 233

      For what its worth. I used to get into hunting shape for the high country by playing basketball at least three days a week. But that ship has sailed with a recent rupture of my right Achilles tendon. I had a great run. Now its time to focus on the future and find the necessary hunting shape by mountain biking, lifting weights, and some rock climbing. I am a huge advocate of being in high country bowhunting shape. Many times it determines how hard you hunt and that can be a huge reason for taking animals….

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Well, long ago I was a trainer in an iron gym and can tell you that there are two basic approaches to strength training: low repetitions with high weight for bulking up … and high repetitions with lower weights for endurance. At my age I’ve shifted to the endurance routine. Plus of course we have to calculate the weight of the container. A good sturdy mug of Kolsch, alternating lifting arms, seems to be about right. In a pinch XX lager will do. And of course, every now and again, you have to lift the pitcher to refill the mug … that’s the extreme part of the workout.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Schnapps NO, Innis and Gunn.

      The joys of having a brother with a pub, Im off to ‘beer club’ its a little like an iron gym without the pain, sweat or weights.

      Mark.

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      David Petersen wrote: Well, long ago I was a trainer in an iron gym and can tell you that there are two basic approaches to strength training: low repetitions with high weight for bulking up … and high repetitions with lower weights for endurance.

      Dave, you can’t flex fitness… I met an old Hungarian trainer who skulled yard glasses. You get a good, heavy one rep lift combined with a long endurance hold. Old school. Imagine doing a yard glass of schnapps! Now there is a test of manhood.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      I’m assuming you guys pour with the opposite hand occasionally in order to keep a balanced look about you. Or after a few does it really make flip? πŸ˜†

    • shaneharley
      Post count: 118

      I’ve pretty much cut a whole lot out of my diet and started walking up a local hill that’s darn steep. I managed to drop 4.4 pounds the first week and 3.8 the next. I think not driking pop helped me a lot.

      I hunted spring bear this year and realized that it might be a whole lot more fun if I was in better shape. Plus packing that bear out about killed me.

      So I decided that to get the most out of my upcoming archery season I would start now. The horrible hill is a killer to walk but it’s getting easier.

      This year I’m hoping my legs will keep up with my enthusiasm to walk the wilderness areas.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      R2 — No, I never switch hands when weight training with liquid-filled glass weights … I use one in each hand. πŸ˜†

      Jim — Does that great Tim Flannery quote come from his “Here on Earth”? I’ve not read it yet, but it sounds closely parallel to the Sagan-Druyan classic “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.” My problem is I’d prefer to skip over the first 4.5b.y. or so, the green slime and all of that, and get right down to say 1.7mya and H. erectus, et al., the original trad hunters!

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Dave, I lifted it from the internet, but I think it’s from “Country”, which I’ve not read. I’m reading a book of his at the moment called ‘The Explorers’. A thing that grabs my imagination about Australian exploration (and may grab yours) is wonderfully summed up by Flannery:

      There is a certain moment in Australian exploration which has always transfixed me. It is the instant when white looks on black, and black on white, for the first time. Neither knows it, but such meetings bridge an extraordinary temporal gulf, for they unite people who became seperated at least 50,000 years ago. That’s 40,000 years longer than people have been in the Americas or Ireland, 20,000 years before the Neanderthals finally surrendered Europe to my ancestors, and 25,000 years before the worst of the last ice age turned most of Australia into a howling desert, a vast dunefield. No other cultures, meeting on the frontier, have been separated by such an unimaginable chasm of time.

      Magic stuff.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Jim, there was a time that I would’ve drank to that, now I “salute”. πŸ™‚

    • johnge75
      Post count: 1

      ShaneHarley wrote: what do you do? What’s your focus?

      I am not one of the ones that stay in shape year long.

      I try to focus on my legs. I do a lot of the stair machine and lunges. I will get a few hikes in throughout the summer but about a month before I am going to hunt I try to spend as much time in mountains as I can to get used to the altitude.

    • rollingrock
      Post count: 4

      I usually run three times a week plus do some push ups and other stuff. But in my opinion, life style is very important too.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      I really hesitated to respond to this because it has been my life. Staying in shape is survival. Lots of good advice here but thought I would share with you all a cardiovascular work out that is not only beneficial but fun8)

      Attending the Army command and general staff school in 82 I was asked to participate in a review of the army’s physical fitness test–(for you Marines out there they were thinking of increasing their 2 mile run to 3). After much testimony from some learned PhD’s the bottom line was –you need to get your heart rate up to 80% of its max for 20-30 minutes a day 3 or 4 times a week. OK, Alex –you can thank me that you guys are still running 2 miles because when asked by the Commanding General what I thought–I said-” Sir you have heard the evidence–2 miles achieves the cardio levels and besides if you go to 3 miles the USMC will go to 5 and we will all hate you”.

      And Gen Saint (later SACEUR) said–best reason I’ve heard we will keep it at 2 miles.

      OK that is the background–now to the workout.

      Preparation–coffee pot minimum 4 cups ready to perk in the morning (presuming only one athlete).

      one pack of non filtered cigarettes (camels are best) next to pot.

      Workout–leap out of bed in the morning (pot on timer of course)run to the kitchen–slug down one cup of java while rapidly inhaling the first camel. Breath deep–repeat 3 times—I’m telling you your heart rate will soar to 85–90% max and stay there for 30 min. minimum.:D

      If your still with me–strength training tomorrow.

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403

      Now I see what is was doing wrong…..damn filters!!!

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I searched and found reference to the BowFit exerciser in this thread so I thought I’d add my two cents. I bought one a while ago, and man…I wish I would’ve bought one over a year ago. It would’ve kept me from tweaking my should late last fall. I use it at work through the day. I initially bought the medium, but later purchased the heavy band separately directly from them. In hindsight, I wouldn’t have purchased the medium band at all.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      I second again the bowfit. I have a heavy band on the rig and bought a second, medium band that I use for the other exercises other than a bow style pull back. Best thing going. I try to squeeze in a few push ups and put a pull up bar (recycled shovel handle) in the studio door for kicks. Beats the gym for me. Dwc

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      The older I get, the more I realize that it’s better to do a little something all the time than to train intensively in bursts. I don’t enjoy exercising indoors. Fortunately, I live in the country and participate in a wide range of enjoyable activities daily in addition to hunting and fishing. Scouting, training my dogs, wildlife photography–it doesn’t matter as long as i’m pushing myself when I do it. Tackling steep terrain regularly is really helpful and counts more than covering a given number of miles. I don’t worry about upper body strength except for a few specific exercises directed at a damaged shoulder. Legs and cardio fitness are what count. If I can’t think of anything better to do, I run a couple miles through the hills around my house. So far, so good. Don

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