Home Forums Bows and Equipment Full length taper?

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    • Ed Zachary
      Post count: 58

      Using power tools, how does one go about forming a full length taper on a 32 inch long 23/64″ shaft? (23/64″ down to say 11/32″ or even 5/16″) Is a router needed with some sort of taper jig? Thanks

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Ed Zachary wrote: Using power tools, how does one go about forming a full length taper on a 32 inch long 23/64″ shaft? (23/64″ down to say 11/32″ or even 5/16″) Is a router needed with some sort of taper jig? Thanks

      Ed
      This can be accomplished with a small plane and sandpaper. You will need to determine how fast you want the taper and mark where the taper will end. Then begin taking very small amounts of wood working toward the knock end and turning the shaft to begin each stroke. This is hand work so eyeball it now and then to see that it is even. When you have your rough taper, finish with it sandpaper but be careful to not take too much too fast.
      It may help to have V block to lay the shaft in while planing.
      Duncan

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      Duncan, I was thinking of doing the same thing basic thing with my doug fir when I finally get around to actually making the arrows (whenever that is…lol). I have two blocks of wood from a firewood tree a friend and I cut down that are about 45″ long (our rounds we marked out were 15″ each…3 x 15″, etc, etc), and they’re approximately 2 1/2-3″ x 4″ or so on the other dimensions. I’m hoping to get a fairly large number of shaft blanks between the two pieces I have so I have lots of stuff to play with. After I cut them down to 3/8″ blanks, what would my next step be? Aside from buying a hand plane to use…lol. Do I need to determine the diameter of my front end or the rear end first? What are good diameters for each? The arrows I shoot now are 2117 aluminums cut at 31 1/2″, and I have 150 gr. broadheads and 145 gr. field tips, currently. Feel free to PM me with your responses if you think it would be easier. Thanks.

      Michael

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Montana,
      I think you would need to bring your square stock down to a round shaft of say 11/32 before beginning a taper. I’ve used a small Stanley plane to make round shafts out of square 3/8 stock. It takes patience though. You basically wind up with a hex shaped shaft. Then carefully remove a few more edges until it is almost round then finish with sand paper until you have the size you want. I made a guage from a piece of scrap iron. When your shaft is very close you might be able to take a drill and run your shaft through the guage then finish the sanding. I have done this with ash but not the wood you mentioned.

      I’m no expert on tapered shafts but I think the taper would take up no more than half the length of the shaft cut to your draw length. I would start with say an 11/32 and go down to 5/16″ on an uncut shaft. The plane I mentioned is a really small mini plane by Stanley and should be available in any hardware store and probably at Walmart. The blade can be sharpened if necessary. To make the taper, I would start at the end and take off very small amounts of material turning the shaft in the same manner as when making the shafts from square stock. That is rotating it 360 degrees each stroke until you reach the desired diameter. I would suggest practicing on a spare shaft. As you take off material your stroke will become longer until it reaches the desired length of taper. Probably should create your taper before cutting the shaft to length.

      I think there is an article on this in a past TBM issue??
      Duncan

    • aeronut
      Member
      Post count: 258

      Go with Rivercane or Bamboo. They are naturally tapered.:D

      Dennis

    • Clay Hayes
      Member
      Post count: 418

      River cane is hard to come by in the Rockies. It is fine stuff though, provided you can find a good stand with few nodes. I wish I had some.

    • Clay Hayes
      Member
      Post count: 418

      Michael, can you post a close up pic of the growth rings in that Doug fir? I’ve made some great fir shafts from some of the heavier wood, but the lighter stuff was way too weak in spine.

      I made a dowling jig out of a plainer using only a drill press. It works awsome for parallel shafting.

      ch

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      I can try. I’ll have to learn how to post pictures, but I’ll see what I can do. I also took some test shots, one with a SHARP 3-blade Wensel, and one of the UNsharpened 2-blades that I won from Standing Bear, and the outcome was an amazing eye-opener. I have those pics on my wife’s camera. Just have to load them.

      Michael

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      Clay Hayes wrote: Michael, can you post a close up pic of the growth rings in that Doug fir? I’ve made some great fir shafts from some of the heavier wood, but the lighter stuff was way too weak in spine.

      I made a dowling jig out of a plainer using only a drill press. It works awsome for parallel shafting.

      ch

      Clay,
      I’d like to see your doweling jig if possible.
      Thanks,
      Duncan

    • Clay Hayes
      Member
      Post count: 418

      Duncan, I posted some pics on the “Trailhead”.

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