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    • tracker26
      Post count: 18

      i was thinkn about elk hunting this year with my recurve in colorado. what draw weight are you guys using on elk? mine is 55#. im sure that will do but im curious about what weight others use.:wink:

      dayton

    • RAGMAN
      Post count: 37

      I shoot 44# @ 30″. Draw length has alot to do with penatration. However 55# will do the job.

    • oldtwohairs
      Post count: 15

      I’m having Mike Steliga from Bruin Bows rework a set of limbs for my takedown to 57# at my draw length. I have a RER that is 63# but it’s just a little more than I can handle comfortably.

      What weight arrows does everyone use for elk? My arrows are 560 to 590 grains.

    • RAGMAN
      Post count: 37

      From my little experience 560 to 590 is very good. I like the 590 with a good sharp two blade head 1 1/4 wide or wider.A good 55 lb bow will do more than what is needed if you put the arrow where it needs to be.

    • Carl
      Post count: 29

      i will be hunting elk this year with a 53#@27 longbow and want my arrows to be in the 530+ gr. range. with a sharp 2 blade head i have absolute confidence in this setup. the last elk i killed [too many years ago] was with a 54# bill stewart recurve, cedar arrows, and zephyr 2 blade head – but i also limit my shots to 30ds or less,preferably 5-10yds ! carl

    • Tracker
      Post count: 2

      I’ve used longbows in the 55-65 pound range, combined with a cedar arrow tipped with 2 or 4 blade heads (550-625 grains) with good results. I like 2 blade penetration, but I’ve also enjoyed more blood on the ground with 4 blades. I haven’t had any penetration problems with the 4 blade (Magnus with a bleeder).

      The last bull I shot gave me a sharply quartering away angle at 20 yards. The cedar/4 blade arrow from the 60# longbow struck just in front of the left hip and exited in front of the right shoulder. Nearly a complete pass through since the broadhead had completely exited the hide. He went 50 yards.

      55 pounds is plenty. Good luck and have fun!

    • Jeremy Holden
      Post count: 59

      Im no expert on elk hunting. In fact I’ve never been. I hear this question asked a bunch though on other forums as well. I always think to myself, don’t forget to check CO state regulations. The state you are going to hunt in may have that weight set for you. I know Illinois and Nebraska do. My 2 cents. Good luck this fall.

      Jeremy

    • JDinCO
      Post count: 15

      The minimum in CO is 35#. Your 55# should be fine.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      CO’s minimum bow weight is an embarrassment and tragedy, more “good work” from CBA, who is more interested in their weak wives and kids being able to hunt elk than trying to elimiante wounded elk running around with arrows flopping around visibly. I’ve been hunting elk in CO for 27 years and have seen and done it almost all. Some years ago I determined that if I couldn’t find a way to kill elk fast and humanely and with certainty, I couldn’t keep hunting them. Back then I was using 64# recurves with aluminum or wood shafts and Thunderhead 3-blade 125s … and never once got a satisfactorily fast kill no matter arrow placement. Average weight was 550. Thank God, then along came Doc Ed Ashby with his great wisdom, which I followed and immediately started getting pass-throughs and animals going down within sight. That said, the arrow is far more important than the bow, though I would never condone less than 50# even if it sometimes works (miss all those ribs, a 50/50 chance broadside and far less at any angle, and maybe can do). In the briefest summary, here is what Ashby says as minimum for big big game like elk, knowing that bone hits are inevitable: Minimum overall arrow weight of 650 grains. Strong, slender two-blade broadheads preferably single-bevel. As much weight as possible up front. I am 63 and my current setup is a 55# Shrew longbow with 750-grain carbon shafts (for their versatility in getting weight up front) and any of several very heavy and strong single-bevel two-blades: ABS “Ashby,” Abowyer “Brown Bear,” Grizzly “El Grande,” Tusker “Concord.” Happily, manufacturers are really getting behind the Ashby technolog and STOS, among others, will soon be coming out with very heavy single-bevel heads. Yeah, it can be done with less and regularly is. But if you don’t want the heartbreak of lousy penetration and a lost wounded animal, why take a chance. And a bonus: The more weight up front, the better the accuracy. dave

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      I agree that 35# is far too light for elk. And, personal opinion, I wouldn’t hunt deer with any less than 45#. But, these are my opinions. Dave, thank you for listing some broadhead choices. That’s always a good starting point. I agree also that weight is an important player. Especially weight forward. One of the “Weekly Tips” was to epoxy a rifle bullet inside the shaft of the arrow just behind the insert. I plan to try this with aluminums and see what I can come up with. I know that it’s gonna be a pretty big bullet, because I shoot 2117’s, but I’m still going to see what I can figure out.

      Michael

    • JDinCO
      Post count: 15

      I was just stating what the law in CO was. That does not mean I condone it. My hunting bow is 59# @ 29″, which is about 53# @ my 27″ draw.

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      JD…sorry to imply that you condoned big game hunting with such light equipment. Didn’t mean for it to come across like that. Montana, sadly enough, does not even list a minimum draw weight for hunting. They also do not list a minimum caliber for hunting guns, for that matter, except for blackpowder.

      Michael

    • JDinCO
      Post count: 15

      Michael. no offence taken, I just wanted to make sure I was clear in my posting. The bottom line is the hunter is responsible to ensure that thier equipment is tunedand shooting properly, broadheads are sharpened and above all has the ability to to make a good ethical shot on the animal.

      Someday I’ll read Dr. A’s report in it”s entirety, I’ve read bits of it.

      JD

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      I’ve also caught bits and pieces here and there on Dr. Ashby’s studies. There’s a lot there to take into consideration. I eventually want to get some of the best shafts, broadheads and other “goodies” I can get, but on a seasonal laborer’s budget with 3 kids and a stay-at-home wife, that’s a while comin.

      Michael

    • JDinCO
      Post count: 15

      I understand that.

    • Jesse Minish
      Post count: 115

      Who is Dr. Ashby? All I know is with a tuned arrow and a razor sharp broad head you shouldn’t have any worries with penetration no matter what someone says you need.

    • kingwouldbe
      Member
      Post count: 244

      Dave2old wrote: CO’s minimum bow weight is an embarrassment and tragedy, more “good work” from CBA, who is more interested in their weak wives and kids being able to hunt elk than trying to elimiante wounded elk running around with arrows flopping around visibly. I’ve been hunting elk in CO for 27 years and have seen and done it almost all. Some years ago I determined that if I couldn’t find a way to kill elk fast and humanely and with certainty, I couldn’t keep hunting them. Back then I was using 64# recurves with aluminum or wood shafts and Thunderhead 3-blade 125s … and never once got a satisfactorily fast kill no matter arrow placement. Average weight was 550. Thank God, then along came Doc Ed Ashby with his great wisdom, which I followed and immediately started getting pass-throughs and animals going down within sight. That said, the arrow is far more important than the bow, though I would never condone less than 50# even if it sometimes works (miss all those ribs, a 50/50 chance broadside and far less at any angle, and maybe can do). In the briefest summary, here is what Ashby says as minimum for big big game like elk, knowing that bone hits are inevitable: Minimum overall arrow weight of 650 grains. Strong, slender two-blade broadheads preferably single-bevel. As much weight as possible up front. I am 63 and my current setup is a 55# Shrew longbow with 750-grain carbon shafts (for their versatility in getting weight up front) and any of several very heavy and strong single-bevel two-blades: ABS “Ashby,” Abowyer “Brown Bear,” Grizzly “El Grande,” Tusker “Concord.” Happily, manufacturers are really getting behind the Ashby technolog and STOS, among others, will soon be coming out with very heavy single-bevel heads. Yeah, it can be done with less and regularly is. But if you don’t want the heartbreak of lousy penetration and a lost wounded animal, why take a chance. And a bonus: The more weight up front, the better the accuracy. dave

      AMAN!!!! Dave, you said it like it is, there are people who think we are fly fishing, and want to use the lightest gear they can get away with.

      I want more than I need to get the job done.

      This is my Elk arrow for this year.

      Oh! by the way it worked excellent also.

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      King,

      Just wanted to say, that is one ugly arrow, as far as asthetics is concerned, but I bet it packs a WHOLLOP!!! I like that you listed all the parts and pieces used. And, obviously, it works very well.

      Michael.

    • Treetopflier
      Post count: 146

      I’m with you, King! Elephants have been killed with a .22, but that doesn’t condone the .22 as a good (lethal, ethical, high odds) choice for elephants! We are limited by physical ability as to the weight bow we can draw … but we are not limited as to the weight arrows we can shoot, and as Doc Ashby notes, in the bow/arrow duality, the arrow is by far the most important for penetration and lethality. Jesse, you owe it to yourself as an open-minded intelligent man to at least read the basics of Ashby’s research, which has been ongoing 10 years longer than you’ve been ongoing, before making flat pronouncements to the contrary. Do a search in the back issues for the two-part overviews of Ashby and his work, put together by Petersen a few years ago. There’s also a basic overview by Don Thomas in the current Bowhunter Big Game issue I hear. King, I’m curious why you stick with aluminum shafts when it’s so much easier to get EFoC, etc. with carbon? Sure do enjoy your posts and photos! Snuffy

    • kingwouldbe
      Member
      Post count: 244

      Thanks Snuffy, that is a carbon with 15″ of aluminum footing over it and another 1 1/2″ over it all, so it’s super tough on impact.

      I also needed more spine to stiffen the shaft.

      I also want to do some internal footing.

    • tracker26
      Post count: 18

      Kingwouldbe wrote: Thanks Snuffy, that is a carbon with 15″ of aluminum footing over it and another 1 1/2″ over it all, so it’s super tough on impact.

      I also needed more spine to stiffen the shaft.

      I also want to do some internal footing.

      hello king! that is an ugggly arrow but yea i bet it hits like a mack truck! with all weight whats ur max range that you shoot at?

    • tracker26
      Post count: 18

      tracker26 wrote: i was thinkn about elk hunting this year with my recurve in colorado. what draw weight are you guys using on elk? mine is 55#. im sure that will do but im curious about what weight others use.:wink:

      dayton

      thank you guys for all the response and info. sorry i havent replied for a while, work has been keeping me very busy and on the road alot. please dont take offence i promise im not trying to be rude

    • kingwouldbe
      Member
      Post count: 244

      tracker26 wrote:
      hello king! that is an ugggly arrow but yea i bet it hits like a mack truck! with all weight whats ur max range that you shoot at?

      45 yards with this arrow.

    • kingwouldbe
      Member
      Post count: 244

      I could shot out to 50, but I’m afraid it will hit them in the top of there head LOL

    • connerp
      Post count: 12

      Not to change the subject, but we are talking about heavy arrows and distanc here, so I figured this is okay. I just shot a mule deer buck here in Utah last night at 45 yards. I am shooting a 56lb Wes Wallace Mentor with a Gold tip arrow and a Eclipse head. The arrow punched through both shoulders like it was nothing! The deer had the same ” shock” type reaction as when you see them get hit with a rifle. I am a firm believer in heavy arrows. Mine weigh 633 grains with 28% EFOC. That arrow hit the buck like a freight train.

      attached file
    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Kingwouldbe wrote:
      This is my Elk arrow for this year.

      😯 Impressive. Do you epoxy the aluminum shaft to the carbon shaft?

    • SDMFer
      Post count: 54

      I shoot 70 @ 28″

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      That’s some shot congratulations, your a more confident archer than me but as ever often when your at full draw you know if the shot is on or not before you even consider lossing.

      Mark.

    • Chiloquin
      Post count: 56

      Dave2old wrote: CO’s minimum bow weight is an embarrassment and tragedy, more “good work” from CBA, who is more interested in their weak wives and kids being able to hunt elk than trying to elimiante wounded elk running around with arrows flopping around visibly. I’ve been hunting elk in CO for 27 years and have seen and done it almost all. Some years ago I determined that if I couldn’t find a way to kill elk fast and humanely and with certainty, I couldn’t keep hunting them. Back then I was using 64# recurves with aluminum or wood shafts and Thunderhead 3-blade 125s … and never once got a satisfactorily fast kill no matter arrow placement. Average weight was 550. Thank God, then along came Doc Ed Ashby with his great wisdom, which I followed and immediately started getting pass-throughs and animals going down within sight. That said, the arrow is far more important than the bow, though I would never condone less than 50# even if it sometimes works (miss all those ribs, a 50/50 chance broadside and far less at any angle, and maybe can do). In the briefest summary, here is what Ashby says as minimum for big big game like elk, knowing that bone hits are inevitable: Minimum overall arrow weight of 650 grains. Strong, slender two-blade broadheads preferably single-bevel. As much weight as possible up front. I am 63 and my current setup is a 55# Shrew longbow with 750-grain carbon shafts (for their versatility in getting weight up front) and any of several very heavy and strong single-bevel two-blades: ABS “Ashby,” Abowyer “Brown Bear,” Grizzly “El Grande,” Tusker “Concord.” Happily, manufacturers are really getting behind the Ashby technolog and STOS, among others, will soon be coming out with very heavy single-bevel heads. Yeah, it can be done with less and regularly is. But if you don’t want the heartbreak of lousy penetration and a lost wounded animal, why take a chance. And a bonus: The more weight up front, the better the accuracy. dave

      I could use the same logic and shoot wheels! shot placement is everything!

    • adirondackman
      Post count: 69

      “I could use the same logic and shoot wheels! shot placement is everything!”

      You are correct about shot placement. However no one can make the perfect shot everytime, especially under hunting conditions. In that case I would make sure that my arrow was set up for optimum penetration.

    • texbow2
      Post count: 3

      I just finished getting my elk set up for NM tuned. 55@27 acs cx, arrow is axis 400(28″) with 100 gr insert and 200gr WW elite. This gives me a 570gr arrow (25% FOC) at about 180fps.
      I’d maybe like a litte more weight but this bareshafts well and I have a lot of confidence on it.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Tex — Indeed, we often run into an overall weight vs. high FoC choice. STart with a light shaft and we can easily get EFoC but not always the 650 min. total weight. It’s even harder with shorter shafts. But also with a shorter shaft you have lots of spine and if you want you can hang a ton of weight up front. I shoot 30″ cheapy Carbon Express 45/70s with 125-grain steel broadhead adapters and 100 grain brass inserts and heads in the 200-grain category and wind up with 680 grains and 26% FoC, dynamite. For woodies I’m currently using pine hexshafts right at 700 total with 200-grain points but can’t even bust 20% FoC with lead or titanium wire inserts. I’m the type of guy who will say, “OK, this is close and it shoots like a bullet, so this is my elk arrow for this year … for now.” Then sit it aside and start playing around again. My biggest surprise through all of this has been how forgiving of spine carbons are, and how much weight I can hang on front of any shaft, so long as it’s within spine range, before the arc becomes so high I must reject it … and even then they fly straight. With the right broadhead you should have pass-throughs if you miss the big bones. I’m jealous of your NM hunt! Gorgeous country and tons of monster bulls, but I’d need another lifetime to draw a tag. Go get ’em, dave

    • sapcut
      Post count: 159

      My biggest surprise through all of this has been how forgiving of spine carbons are, and how much weight I can hang on front of any shaft, so long as it’s within spine range, before the arc becomes so high I must reject it … and even then they fly straight.

      Ain’t no doubt whatsoever about that statement. Until you experience it you won’t believe it is possible.

      Richie

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