Home Forums Campfire Forum Elephant with a bow

Viewing 57 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      I’m interested in talking to anyone who has hunted elephant with a bow and arrow. I have a custom made Ferguson longbow with a pull of 85 lbs. I really like the German Kinetics broadhead…I’ve used it on African game and it worked fabulously! As far as elephant, I’m looking at several countries and outfitters in Africa. Would really like to talk to anyone who has done this.

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      Firstly, no, I don’t have any information on hunting elephants or any other african game. What I’m interested in, is why on Planet Earth would anybody want to hunt an elephant? I mean, that’s a lot of meat. Especially if you have to take care of the meat in hot temperatures. I don’t think I would want to eat elephant, anyway. Kinda like I don’t ever plan to have shark or alligator or mountain lion. Just doesn’t sound appetizing to me.

      Michael

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Can’t comment on hunting jumbo with a bow but a friend had some info a while back from the Department of Game Management in either Kenya or SA. They were prepared to notify visiting hunters if a a rogue elephant had to be dealt with, very much cheaper that a commercially guided hunt and they supplied the butcher boys and mobile canning plant. Downside no romance attached to it and no chance of a trophy, upside plenty of guys about with big guns.

      It was also suggested to stay well clear when they start butchering with machetes.

      That said I’m with MontanaFord on this one, brings a whole new meaning to the term Jumbo Burger.

      Let us know how you get on.

      Pothunter.

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      I’m surprised and I guess dissapointed in your question: Why would anyone want to hunt an elephant?
      Sounds like the questions I get from anti-hunters when I travel…why would anyone hunt any animal?
      The basic answer from me is simple: I love it and it’s challenging. An elephant with a bow brings back memories of Fred Bear and Howard Hill. Danger, excitement and a personal challenge.
      And I want to do this the really hard way, not with a rifle, not with a compound bow but with a genuine longbow. Just getting in shape to pull an 85 lb bow is challenging in itself! And then stalking on foot and getting within 20 yards of an elephant with only a longbow would be a mega adrenaline rush! I’m intersted in the feat itself, for myself.
      Would I eat it? Absolutely. The meat would be used to feed an entire village. I once hooked and fought a Great White Shark on a fly rod (The first in the world, by the way) at Pitt Island, 500 miles off the coast of New Zealand. Did I eat it? You bet! The best fish I’ve ever eaten and we fed the towns people, all 50 of ’em, on Pitt Island. I wrote an article of my trip in Fish and Fly Adventure Magazine.
      So why would I want to hunt an elephant? The same reason you and I want to hunt deer or elk, or shoot fish with a bow or an alligator, or just some ole raccoon. It’s traditional archery, Man.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      bvalette, I have no advise to give (never hunted elephant). Just wanted to say, well said. Rather bizarre replies from, presumably, fellow bowhunters. Good luck

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      For the record, I’m not saying there is anything wrong with bowhunting (or any hunting for that matter) an elephant. For myself, it’s just something I would never consider doing. I’ve never read accounts of Fred Bear’s hunts or Howard Hill’s hunts. I don’t know what all they’ve hunted. Hunting game off of this continent isn’t something I will ever see myself doing. I doubt I will ever travel very far at all to hunt. Just not something that interests me. I’m very happy hunting close to home. Eating something as exotic as elephant, or even gator, even though I know that people do it, just isn’t something that appeals to me. I apologize if I came across as condecending in my previous post.

      Michael

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Thanks Patrick and Thanks Michael.
      I used to leave college (1977), drive 20 minutes to Fort Meade base in Maryland and hunt whitetail deer with my Bear Bow until dark. I still love deer hunting first and foremost. But the 20 mintue drive has been replaced by 20 minutes of housing, I now live in Colorado…and my drive to hunt deer is 3 hours in Nebraska. I really do miss those easy afternoon September hunts! So, now, being 50, I take a hunting trip abroad every year…And my 4 kids (all under 14) are really getting into archery, hunting and rifle hunting too. It’s a family affair. But, I won’t be taking my son on the elephant hunt!!
      Just for the record, the cost of a mixed plains game hunt in Africa can cost the same as an elk hunt here in Colorado.
      If you search some professional hunters websites..there are some very good archery deals out there.
      Brett

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      bvalette,

      I also wanted to tell you good luck on your quest for an elephant. It will probably be quite the hunt, in reality. Will you have a rifle back-up? I hope so. Good luck.

      Michael

    • Jesse Minish
      Post count: 115

      I have no experience with elephants but I wanted to say good luck!

      Oh and I think cougar is excellent table fair.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Hi Bvalette

      I don’t think anyone is saying DON’T DO IT, it’s just when you look at the stats it is seriously dangerous, if you have a perfect heart shot how long before jumbo knows he is dead.

      Many of the old accounts fail to mention that the elephants had been knee capped so that they could not charge.

      I worked in a Safari park whilst still at school and have a lot of respect for elephants they can reach right into you when they make that rumbling noise you feel it come up through your boots, no idea what it means but it feels primeval, like being visited by your ancestors.

      I also wish you the best of luck and hope we all get to share in your celebrations.

      Pothunter.

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Thanks for all the encouragement!
      For a great, fun video get: Moments of Truth. Bill Negley is the traditional archer. He filmed some truly amazing tradional archery hunting scenes…he actually gets mauled by a wounded lion on film. He also challenged the Howard Hill elephant shot..proving that Hill had shot the elephant in the knee with a rifle so it couln’t escape. I was excruiatingly dissapointed when I found that out. But Hill was the only archer I knew that had done that unethical deed. Pope and Young, Ben Pearson, Fred Bear and Negley all shot dangerous game fairly.
      Brett

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Bill Negley, that’s the name I was searching for, he is the man. I read his account of elephant hunting may have been in TBM and was impressed by the man’s character and his approach, may well be worth asking Robin if she has any contact details.

      Have been unable to get the contact details for culling of rogue elephants, my friend moved house last year and I’ve only spoken to him briefly since.

      Pothunter.

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Yes, Bill Negley’s video is one of the best in vintage bowhunting. He died a year or two ago.
      Brett

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      I was not aware of his death, a sad loss to the community.

    • paza
      Post count: 28

      bvalette wrote: I’m surprised and I guess dissapointed in your question: Why would anyone want to hunt an elephant?
      Sounds like the questions I get from anti-hunters when I travel…why would anyone hunt any animal?
      The basic answer from me is simple: I love it and it’s challenging. An elephant with a bow brings back memories of Fred Bear and Howard Hill. Danger, excitement and a personal challenge.
      And I want to do this the really hard way, not with a rifle, not with a compound bow but with a genuine longbow. Just getting in shape to pull an 85 lb bow is challenging in itself! And then stalking on foot and getting within 20 yards of an elephant with only a longbow would be a mega adrenaline rush! I’m intersted in the feat itself, for myself.
      Would I eat it? Absolutely. The meat would be used to feed an entire village. I once hooked and fought a Great White Shark on a fly rod (The first in the world, by the way) at Pitt Island, 500 miles off the coast of New Zealand. Did I eat it? You bet! The best fish I’ve ever eaten and we fed the towns people, all 50 of ’em, on Pitt Island. I wrote an article of my trip in Fish and Fly Adventure Magazine.
      So why would I want to hunt an elephant? The same reason you and I want to hunt deer or elk, or shoot fish with a bow or an alligator, or just some ole raccoon. It’s traditional archery, Man.

    • paza
      Post count: 28

      Bavalette: Go get your elephant, tells us your stories when you get back! I’d do it if I had the oppurtunity, and so would any real traditional bow hunter. As far as the meat goes, the African tribes will be thanking you for many moons for the meat, and you will have your great exsperience plus the pictures and your trophy! Anyone who don’t know who bill n. is is not reading up much on traditional archery.

    • paza
      Post count: 28

      Howard Hill also tied the leapord to a tree in the movie Tembo. Just look real close when watching the kill and you can see the grass move between the cat and the tree it is tied to. Howard was a great bow shooter and hunter, but had been around fagsvillle to long (hollywood). To much phony movie settings. Good luck everyone with real hunting and real bow and arrow hunting equipment. Pela-miya!

    • texasota
      Post count: 47

      in regard to a few post at the top of this page:i watched a hunting show(cant remember the name) but he hunted an elephant and gave the meat to the village, and there was alot of meat. so as long as it seves a purpose i have no problem with you hunting elephant, good luck bvalette, let us know how it goes

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Paza….I went to school in “fagsville.” And a lot of my friends and family work and live in LA and Hollywood and Santa Monca…Very little offends me, but I’m sure there are some archers and hunters who live in Hollywood and surrounding area (I did) and they would object to your vulgar description…but you probably don’t care about that. This is my topic and I object to your name calling.
      Can’t we just keep this post about hunting?

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      paza…as a “real traditional bow hunter”, i have no inclination to travel to other continents to pursue other game animals. i’m perfectly happy hunting right here in montana. for those hunters, such as bvalette, who do have that inclination, i wish them the best of luck in their endeavors. for myself, my holy grail so to speak, whether with a rifle in hand, or my bow, is mule deer bucks here in northwest montana. i don’t appreciate you insinuating that those of us that don’t have the inclination to travel to hunt are not “real traditional bow hunters”. thank you.

      Michael

      p.s. bvalette, i’m not trying to hijack your topic, just felt that that needed to be said.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Although I don’t have a view one way or the other regarding Paza’s comments he does raise an interesting point ‘what constitutes a true bowhunter’ and the importance of fair chase.

      Is the true bowhunter defined by the quarry that he pursues or the manner in which he pursues it, can the humble rabbit be as equally prized as an elephant. Does the location or cost of a hunt make a true bowhunter, I hope not.

      Pothunter.

    • crittergitter
      Post count: 42

      I WISH YOU LUCK.AND I MUST SAY THAT ALLTHOUGH I WILL NEVER GET TO HUNT ELEPHANT AND IF I DID I WOULD NOT SHOOT HIM IN THE KNEE WITH A RIFLE FIRST,I DO NOT BLAME HOWARD HILL FOR DOING SO ALL THAT WAS WAS SELF RESPECT I MEAN HE FELT IT WAS NECESSARY PRECAUTION,THE LEAPORD OR WHATEVER IT WAS I THINK WAS A LITTLE UNFAIR TO TIE IT TO A TREE.I WAS WATCHING A SHOW ON TV WHEN SOME SUPPOSED TO BE REALLY GOOD HUNTER”YEAH RIGHT” WENT HUNTING FOR LEAPORD,SO THEY BAITED IT AND HE SHOT IT WITH A RIFLE AND WOUNDED IT THEN THE WHOLE LOT OF THE 4 OR 5 PEOPLE STARTING SHOOTING AT THE CHARGING BEAST,THE ENTIRE TIME I WAS THINK IF EVER I DID HAVE THE CHANCE TO HUNT LEAPORD I WOULD ONLY DO IT IF A REALLY GOOD SHOTGUNNER, ONE THAT I HAD PERSONALLY SEEN HUNTING DUCKS OR DOVES,STANDING BY WITH NUMBER 4 BUCK SHOT.I MEAN TRYING TO SHOOT A CHARGING LION WITH A RIFLE IS JUST STUPID.ANYONE CAN SAY WHAT THEY WANT I KNOW IF A LION WAS CHARGING ME AND I HAD MY BENELLIE SUPER 90 12 GA AND NO 4 BUCK SHOT THE BEAST WOULD NOT STAND A CHANCE,IF I DID NOT ROLL THE BEAST WITH ONE SHOT I DESERVE TO BE EATEN.PLEASE COMMENT ON BUCK SHOT RUNNING CAT VS RIFLE.

    • Todd Smith
      Post count: 167

      bvalette

      I’ve certainly never hunted elephant, but Ed and Garrett Schlief have had several of their customers go. They can set you up with a good arrow and broadhead combo and could probably put you in touch with some of the folks who have taken elephant.

      BTW There’s an interesting video of a post-mortem test done on an elephant on the Alaska Bowhunting Supply site. AlaskaBowhunting.com

      I’ve heard them speak highly of Neil Summers. He owns Bowhunting Safair Consultants. 800-833-9777 neil@bowhuntingsafari.com If you contact Neil he should be able to find you a good hunt.

      Best of luck! todd

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      I have not had an opportunity to hunt elephants, but I have been close to a lot of them in the wild and would do it in a heartbeat if the opportunity arose. The late Bill Negley (and this is not the place to debate whether Negley or Hill was the first to take the Big 5 with a bow) was a great friend, and when I asked him which of the 5 was his favorite to hunt he replied emphatically: elephants! In reply to Michael I can only say that I have eaten a fair amount of alligator and a whole lot of cougar and found it all delicious! Don’t let cultural biases unfairly influence your assumptions about wild game on the table. Don

    • robertson
      Post count: 1

      Hello good morning to all of you

      I guided in Tanzania for more than 20 years and

      i had a bowhunter some years ago coming for Elephant ,

      buffalo and hippo .

      We got the Buff and the hippo and we found a “legal” elephant

      than mean with the tusks long enought to be shootable , but

      we never got a shot at that bull , protect by two ” askaris ”

      if you want more infos , it will be my pleasure to help you

      Pascal

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      Pascal, really glad to see you here.

      Ed

    • Don Thomas
      Member
      Post count: 334

      No more unnecessarily offensive posts, please. Otherwise, I’ll have to figure out how to use my Moderator authority, and then I’ll really be in a bad mood. Don

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Thanks everyone for the encouragment.
      As of today, I don’t have an elephant hunt scheduled, but I do have a crocodile bow hunt scheduled for July 2010 along with a rhino dart hunt…that I’m trying to pursuade the outfitter to let me do it with my bow and a special dart arrow, instead of a dart gun.
      If I get either animal, I’ll be writing this one for TB magazine, Don. Hope you’d be interested!
      Bill Negley’s video, I think, is one of the best…even by today’s standards.
      Don, you are lucky to have known him. I wish I had had the opportunity to have met him.
      A word on game meat….I shot a cape buffalo this past June with a rifle. The fillets from that buffalo were like a $100 steak from Mortons. Better,even! I could not believe how juicy, tender and flavorful they were.
      If any of you get a chance, see the movie, Food Inc. It will make any of you eat more wild game meat. After the movie (and seeing what goes into a beef burger) My wife said I could go hunting more often as long as I bring home game to eat. What a deal! An 8 dollar movie ticket got me more hunting days!
      Thanks everyone!
      Brett

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      Don,

      I’m not doubting the quality of alligator or mountain lion (or any other species) as table fare. I simply have my own biblical beliefs as to what should and should not be eaten. For myself, these are creatures that have been deemed unclean. If I’m the person cooking, or if I have a choice in what goes on my plate, I choose to follow my beliefs. I won’t try to turn this into a religious debate, because it’s not worth the argument. It’s kind of like two people arguing what’s better…a wood arrow or a carbon arrow…well, it’s personal belief and preference.

      Brett,

      Good luck on your croc hunt, and also your rhino dart hunt. I hope that outfitter lets you use your bow. Good luck and shoot straight.

      Michael

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Thanks! Michael.
      It’s a ways off, but I’m preparing and practicing!
      Brett

    • Arko
      Post count: 7

      MontanaFord wrote: Firstly, no, I don’t have any information on hunting elephants or any other african game. What I’m interested in, is why on Planet Earth would anybody want to hunt an elephant? I mean, that’s a lot of meat. Especially if you have to take care of the meat in hot temperatures. I don’t think I would want to eat elephant, anyway. Kinda like I don’t ever plan to have shark or alligator or mountain lion. Just doesn’t sound appetizing to me.

      Michael

      It’s actually quite good. No, I have not killed an elephant but did det drunk once in Berlin(:wink:) and we ended up in KeDeVe which has an endless food bazaar on the top floor and went on a sampling spree. I don’t know if it was that good German beer or what but I DO remember that I liked it.

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      Here’s hoping you don’t have to turn that elephant into a pincushion.

      Can you really take one down with just a few arrows? My question is – Is the longbow the adequate weapon for an elephant?

      I can understand going to hunt any critter but it is important for me to know I have the ability to take the animal reasonably efficiently and as expedient as possible.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Reasonably efficient is very relative. To some, that means you need to use a rifle to deer hunt. To others a 30/30 wouldn’t qualify. For the same reason a bow can “efficiently” kill a deer, it can kill an elephant.

      I’m sure there’s lots of data/articles. Here’s something I found quickly (I had saw it earlier, so I knew where to look):
      http://www.alaskabowhunting.com/PR/How_to_kill_an_elephant.pdf

    • lssa
      Post count: 38

      good luck

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      Sure… Any term you want to use in any language can be relatively applied. I’d say that if it cannot be taken down with say 2-3 arrows then you might run a good chance of just wounding an animal and it probably is not worth trying to harvest in the first place if you cannot have some sort of predictable outcome of success. That’s just a number off the top of my head but it seems reasonable that most animals might be able to make a getaway after the first arrow strikes. If it isn’t a mortal shot then that sort of hunting approach could leave a lot of wounded animals. I’d say that there is definitely some limits to archery and that if you are going to shoot an elephant you owe it back to the elephant and the fellow archery community members to try and take it swiftly and with as little chance at leaving it wounded as possible. There’s definitely a fine line as to what is reasonable from my perspective but I am not the law and most of all I think it is worth thinking about out loud publicly. If you’re going to ruin the image of all archers for a publicity stunt or for some self served purpose then be ready for some critics. Don’t take it too personally right now but just think about what you do. If you can do it then go ahead..

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I’ve gotta say that I don’t think you’re getting it. As an example, have you read Don Thomas’ book, “Longbows in the Far North”? If so, I think you’d agree that he is a very ethical hunter, and recognizes the limitations of the longbow. He’d do it, as he noted above, if given the chance. It bothers me a little that you would think those “considering” it haven’t all ready thought about it.

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      If getting means I have to agree with you then I probably don’t get it. I am not offended when people disagree with me. I am offended if people think they are justified by wounding animals without much thought.

      Considering is another one of those words where I can utilize one of your previous remarks – something to the effect of relative meaning of a term or word.

      At any rate if someone wants to shoot an elephant they are going to shoot it with whatever they want. I’m not stopping them and I do advocate discussion to consider what they are doing. Including them being criticized for their actions if it seems reasonable that they failed because they didn’t do enough research and were not well equipped , or fit enough to accomplish the mission. Now I know I have failed at many things in life but I am not bold enough to say I am going to kill and elephant with a longbow and I do believe that there are people who can achieve this goal. I think it has been done before but just because someone has done something doesn’t mean it is a good idea.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Nor am I offended if someone disagrees with me. Happens all the time! 🙂

      I believe it’s already been researched, and carefully considered. No need to reinvent the wheel.

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      I was going to say something to the effect of “It’s great to live in a free country and you can do what you want.” except I forgot all the elephants live in Africa and we would have to abide by their regulations.

      Anyway – Yes , I bet there is a lot of thought into getting an elephant hunt done. In fact they are probably thinking about how to pay for the hunt and logistics. I hope they put a lot of effort into how to bring it down and make traditional archers look good. In fact I hope they do it in 1, 2 or 3 shots. It would prove that once again that traditional archery setup is a tool set which is up to the task to take just about any land mammal.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      rayborbon wrote: I was going to say something to the effect of “It’s great to live in a free country and you can do what you want.” except I forgot all the elephants live in Africa and we would have to abide by their regulations.

      The elephants don’t set regulations. Otherwise, I’m sure they’d be on the endangered species list (or the African equivalent). Sorry for the bad joke. :-/

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Elephants are deceiving they can be very aggressive and very quick, when wounded they may well stand and fight. The income generated from elephant hunting pays for anti poaching, fencing around crops, wages and park management. The meat will be processed very quickly, some going to local people and some canned for latter distribution. Elephant conservation has been so successful there numbers have increased dramatically.

      Received this last week’7 days elephant hunts in Zimbabwe for £5495, 15 animals remain unsold’

      It’s not for me but I do not condemn anyone for going, except that in Rhodesia we all know that the money will end up in Mugabe’s pocket whilst his people stave.

      Mark.

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      My experience in Africa is that Conservationist support wildlife survival … but it’s Hunters who PAY for wildlife survival.

      Most of the bow-killed elephant taken recently have been one arrow kills, but that’s beside the point. Even when guiding rifle hunters for elephant, or any other potentually dangerous game, we always wanted them to keep shooting as long as the animal was still going … and “pay the insurance” at least once after it was down! As a percentage of those taken, I suspect that more rifle-killed elephant taken in recent years have been multiple shot kills than those taken with arrows.

      Ed

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      I’m willing to bet it takes a lot less luck and research to kill an elephant with a single shot from a rifle than it does with a bow and single arrow. Supply right caliber, bullet and shot placement – done deal in one or two shots I bet.

      Anyway – I think it’s right up there with hunting lions with longbows. It’s been done but word on the street where I live is both animals often turn into pincusions during the process. Not my cup of tea. I know some animals require multiple shots but I don’t personally believe it should be an accepted practice or approach (planning to take a volley of shots with my bow). Maybe the gun is more suitable if that is what is necessary. I would accept instances where it is a situational development instead. I aim for one shot and sometimes it turns into more but usually not more than three (in fact not yet ever). I am not preaching I am clearly stating what I view is acceptable practice and approach for me. Some guys might criticize me on my arrow setup but this is not much different.

      On the same subject sort of – I wouldn’t archery hunt any critters where a guide would be required to stand behind me with firearms. I’d rather do it on my own or I’d rather not do it. That’s just a personal choice of mine. I don’t think any more or less of anyone who chooses otherwise.

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      rayborbon wrote: I’m willing to bet it takes a lot less luck and research to kill an elephant with a single shot from a rifle than it does with a bow and single arrow. Supply right caliber, bullet and shot placement – done deal in one or two shots I bet.

      An arrow requires no more luck than a rifle, but it does take more research and preparation. Just as for rifles, right bow, right arrow with the right broadhead, and right shot placement – done deal in one shot. And the up side for most of the bowhunters attempting an elephant is that they know they have to properly prepare. Many of the rifle hunters don’t prepare properly, and many of those we guided showed up with guns they were terrified to shoot. As a consequence they shot them rather poorly … with less than nice results.

      Ed

    • rayborbon
      Post count: 298

      Being capable of making the correct shot seems like something derived from the person and not the weapon. Unless of course you’re shooting something way beyond acceptable range.

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      Absolutely true! I’ve guided hunters who were ‘really good shots’ (on targets) who shot really poorly on every animal, and I’ve also guided hunters who barely shot ‘adequately’ (on targets), yet consistently made well place, clean killing shots on each and every animal they fired at. It’s neither the weapon nor the technical skill of the shooter, it the “hunter”. Some folks just have more “hunter” than others.

      Ed

    • kingwouldbe
      Member
      Post count: 244

      Dr. Ed Ashby wrote: Absolutely true! I’ve guided hunters who were ‘really good shots’ (on targets) who shot really poorly on every animal, and I’ve also guided hunters who barely shot ‘adequately’ (on targets), yet consistently made well place, clean killing shots on each and every animal they fired at. It’s neither the weapon nor the technical skill of the shooter, it the “hunter”. Some folks just have more “hunter” than others.

      Ed

      Hi Doc, I have no doubt you have seen this, however that is not the norm, most bad shots are worse shots with adrenalin and the excitement of the hunt on game animals.

      I think why some people “look” like good hunting shots is because they shoot far less arrows while hunting ( most only shoot a few arrow on a hunt ) and they only take high percentage shots.

      While at the target butts we may shoot more arrows at one setting than we shoot all season hunting ( I will shot 50-100 arrows easily at one practice time ) as instinctive shooter it’s vary hard to maintain concentration for that many shots.

      A bad shooter is a bad shooter, there is no way they can magically become a good shot on game.

      30 years ago I was a way better hunter than I was a shot, I could get close to all kinds of game only to blow the shot at the moment of truth.

      I set out to become a excellent shot( it took dedication and hard work ) and it has paid huge dividends.

      The target that you want to hit does not matter ( wether a animal or a spot ) only the ability to hit what you want consistently.

      On the flip side because you can hit a target does not mean you can hit game ( you also must be a hunter and able to hold your mud at the moment of truth )

      Just my 2 cents my friend.

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      Dave, you have my point exactly, just from a different view. An adequate shot, who’s a good hunter, able to regularly get game within his effective range AND has the ability to still shoot at his ‘adequate’ level when faced with the moment of truth will make far more ‘successful shots’ than will the exceptional shot who doesn’t hunt as well (forcing him to take harder, higher risk shots, which being the good shot he is, he KNOWS he can make), gets excited and forgets all the important basics. An excellent shot who’s also a good hunter and able to control his emotions; now that’s a deadly combination!

      I have one of my Old Derelict articles that looked at some research data for hunting success rates between the Bushman hunters of the Ju/wasi and !Xo tribes, as well as that of the hunters in the Hudza tribe. It concentrates on what the most successful hunters among these groups, who are, arguably, the most skilled trackers/hunters in the world, view as the most important qualities that contribute to a hunter’s success. Truly fascinating stuff! If you’re interested, the information I used to write that article came from a book titled, “The Art of Tracking; The Origin of Science” by Louis Lienbenberg … or you could PM your email address and I’ll send you a copy of my article.

      Ed

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      Wow! What a discussion. And some very interesting and enlightening points of view. I appreciate the interest.
      I’m not going to be able to add anything new, but I find some of the comments quite interesting and maybe youthful in perspective. Maybe it’s because I’m 51 years old and grew up watching Fred Bear, Ben Pearson, Bill Neagley and The American Sportsman on TV, but all of the great giant animals on earth have been successfully and humanely killed with traditional archery equipment. I’m not even close to one of those guys, but I want the thrill of trying it. And I firmly believe that with the proper archery set up and practice I can do this with confidence. My set up is a custom made Ferguson longbow at 86 lbs. made by Byron Ferguson’s son. My arrows are heavy in weight, carbon, and tipped with German Kinetics broadheads 200 grain. Another bowhunter (compound bowhunter at Orion Adventures, they do an archery TV show also) uses the Ashby head and dropped an elephant with one arrow. He is pushing me to change my broadheads to the Ashby.
      I’m pushing him to do the next elephant with traditional equipment!
      Bill Neagley in his video states that he hunted dangerous game without a rifle backup after he was attacked by a lion, but, I’m not that brave (and I have four younger kids), so I will have a rifle backup and the outfitters I’ve discussed this with, require it.
      As far as animals running away looking like pin cushions…review the hunts by Pope and Young, they shot alot of arrows into animals. But today, with our superior equipment, that’s not necessary. They also took really, really long shots!
      If you watch the ‘old’ movies, the great archers had supreme hunting skills and took close shots at dangerous game.
      With the compound bow, I’ve seen — on TV — guys discussing shots at 70 yards! I’ve shot by bow at targets at 80 yards, just see how it performs, but I’m a 25 yard guy. And that is comfortable to me.
      Thanks for the opinions and the comments…I’ve been enjoying the read.
      BV

    • Rocks
      Post count: 104

      Good luck in your quest, it sounds like you are well prepared and I wish you the best, look forward to the results.

      I always thought if I went to Africa I’d like to take an elephant. I don’t think I will ever be able to afford an elephant hunt, but may go some day for plains game. I worked with a fellow last spring that went for and was successful taking an elephant (rifle), he said it was the best hunt he’s ever been on.

      Take Care
      Mark

    • Randy B
      Post count: 3

      Not sure I’d want to be 25 yrds from a elephant I was going to shoot with a bow. Best wishes on your hunt. I’ve been looking into a plains game hunt for sometime down the road. I’d like to do the spot and stalk over sitting in a blind.

    • Ed Ashby
      Member
      Post count: 816

      BV,

      If your PH is the ‘right sort’ (and he had better be if your after elephant with a bow) you’re shot will be at very close range; probably well less than 20 yards. It’s relativel easy to get close to elephant … but it’s a lot harder to put distance between youself and them!

      Even with the rifle hunters we wouldn’t let them shoot at elephant beyond 25 yards. It’s not that hard to get close, and you want your placement to be good. Along those lines, we had one, forever-nameless client who had a 25 yard shot, from a rest against a tree, on a standing elephant that was in the clear, nothing but grass from the rifle’s muzzle to the elephant. He didn’t cut a single hair! Elephants can do strange things to folks sometimes. Just stay focused on shot placement and forget all else … it helps control the emotions. Save the gitters for when it’s all over. When bowhunting the big, dangerous game it’s just as much mental ability as physical skills.

      Ed

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Dr. Ed Ashby wrote: BV,

      If your PH is the ‘right sort’ (and he had better be if your after elephant with a bow) you’re shot will be at very close range; probably well less than 20 yards. It’s relativel easy to get close to elephant … but it’s a lot harder to put distance between youself and them!

      Even with the rifle hunters we wouldn’t let them shoot at elephant beyond 25 yards. It’s not that hard to get close, and you want your placement to be good. Along those lines, we had one, forever-nameless client who had a 25 yard shot, from a rest against a tree, on a standing elephant that was in the clear, nothing but grass from the rifle’s muzzle to the elephant. He didn’t cut a single hair! Elephants can do strange things to folks sometimes. Just stay focused on shot placement and forget all else … it helps control the emotions. Save the gitters for when it’s all over. When bowhunting the big, dangerous game it’s just as much mental ability as physical skills.

      Ed

      That gives me goose bumps just thinking about it! LESS than 20 yards :shock:, What a rush that’d be!

    • Bvalette
      Post count: 19

      For those of you wanting a African bow plains game hunt…wow, there are some great places and great prices in Africa.
      Two outfitters that I have used are Motsomi safaris in South Africa. PH is Pieter. He will spot and stalk anything you want. Took my entire family there.
      the other great company is Coenraad Vermaak safaris. My ph was Hans or he’s called ‘Scruff.’ I wrote about this bow hunt in TB magazine a time ago called: Nyala the hard way.
      Hans will make you a blind on the spot or spot and stalk.
      Both of these companies have web pages.
      And both of these companies cut me a deal when I asked, especially now, see if they have a package deal. Especially if you are taking a son or daughter. Ask to have them along to hunt for free or at the observer rate and they pay the trophy fees. It’s a fun way to get teens involved because they see so many animals in a day. Just beware…the taxidermy fees for the heads are about the same as the trophy fees…but it’s so fantastic to see the heads on the wall and remember the hunt.
      I also had a videographer along…it is really special to have a DVD of your hunt. I used Lew Harris Safaris in South Africa. They have a film component to their safaris. They are reasonable and fun.
      I hope I didn’t sound like a commercial here. but there are a lot of outfitters in SA and I’ve had one really bad bowhunt with one in Namibia.
      Always check the references.
      BV

    • skip.jacobs1
      Post count: 13

      If you read in Chuck Adam’s Biography Life at Full Draw, he has a story about elephant hunting. He was using a compound bow with a 100lb draw and was unable to kill the animal, the guide had to shoot it as it charged and almost killed one of the people in the hunting party. Apparently if you hit rib bone the arrow will not penetrate, period. They did several penetration attempts on the dead elephant and were only able to get clean “kill shots” if the arrow passed between rib bones. Additionally, the animal has so much hide, fat, and muscle that you can’t see the rib bones to be able to aim and shoot between them. While I don’t have any issues hunting an elephant I would not recommend it based on what I read due to the high potential for danger to not only yourself but member of your party but more importantly because the odds of wounding the animal is too high for me to judge as ethical. Hope this helps and if you choose to go after it anyway i wish you good look.

    • LucasK
      Post count: 10

      There have been several elephants taken with traditional equipment. Several of the successful attempts that I have read about seem to include shots angling forward through the liver this shot minimizes the chance of hitting a rib. Robert Eastman who shot the heaviest ivoried bull by bow did this. There is a long tracking job that follows as elephants have a lot of blood. There are also accounts of arrows going through ribs Tink Nathan comes to mind. With the improvements in equipment and general understanding of penetration available I see no reason why you couldn’t harvest an elephant with your bow. I wish you the best of luck in this endeavor
      Lucas

    • LucasK
      Post count: 10

      I was just reading this months issue and noticed that there is a picture of Dennis Kamstra in the classic successful elephant hunter pose between two tusks… anyone know anything about it?
      Lucas

    • paza
      Post count: 28

      I have been wondering if Bvalette ever went for the elephant.Was wanting to hear his story.

Viewing 57 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.