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    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Yea, I make all my own bows but this one really is the cats meow. Found this pic while surfing.

      Sweetest looking bow I ever saw. And yes, I would hunt with it. If I read the story right it was just $4000.00.:shock:

      I couldn’t afford to buy another bow so it would have to cover all my needs.

    • Dave Nash
      Member
      Post count: 113

      Museum piece for sure, wow

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Incredible craftsmanship. I love that expression by the way, “the cat’s meow”!

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      That looks like a Blacktail bow they are built by Norm Johnson in Oregon. Blacktail & the crooked arrow are Norm’s trademark.

      I have an older Blacktail Elite & it’s a fantastic shooter. I’d bet that bow would be a fantastic shooter too. Thanks for sharing the picture with us.

    • jpcjpc
      Member
      Post count: 170

      This bow is a fantastic craftsmanship, but what about performance ?

      If you’r in love with this bow I can undurstand , but just to put this bow on your wall

      performance bows are an other thing

      I’m in love with Blacktail bows from Norm Johnson , but thèses bows are made as piece of art

      I would’t go hunting with such an expensive jewel and if I reconize Blacktail bows are top of esthetic they are very far from the best of tecknoogie and performance

      Some bows are made for exhibition others for performance

      Just have to know wthat you’r looking for

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      It’s the feathers that really trip my fancy. I’m surprised none of the usual suspects sell “exotic” feathers. Of course, beautiful as they may be, it’s likely none could equal the all-around performance of turkey. And like the bow, it would seem a shame to take them hunting and risk damage or loss.

      There is art and there is utility. And sometimes, there’s the best of both worlds … as in a Clovis point.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      To hang that on the wall and not hunt with it would be tragic, perhaps stay out of the mud and rain.

      Are the fletchings peacock? if so they were highly thought of for hunting in the middle ages as they are super quiet.

      Reminds me I must build a bow rack for my meager collection.

      Mark.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2361

      David Petersen wrote: It’s the feathers that really trip my fancy…

      Right On! I wonder what bird gave those up?

      Can’t see enough of the bow to know what it really looks like anyway.

    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Post count: 573

      Yeah the fletchings caught my eye as well. We have that bird stuffed in our museum at school, they are tail feathers, but I can’t remember that birds name. I’ll check it out today and report back later.

    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Post count: 573

      Here is the bird, its called a “Great Argus pheasant”.

      attached file
    • FallguyFallguy
      Member
      Post count: 317

      I now a guy that knows Norm, I sent him the picture he said the bow is actually 4,495.00 and the arrows are 100.00 each. I asked him about the feathers he is checking in to it.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      I’d like to see that strutting its stuff in the spring I should think it makes quite a display.

      Just thought to Google it

      http://www.arkive.org/great-argus/argusianus-argus/video-09.html

      Quite a display and looks more like a peacock than any pheasant I’ve chased.

      Mark.

    • Ptaylor
      Member
      Post count: 573

      Wow, great video. Those are the wing feathers with the spots. Really crazy display.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Hammer and our other fly-tossers and tiers must be out fishing, else they’d have commented that argus feathers are commonly used in flies. Google “greater argus pheasant feathers for sale” and you’ll find ’em for $8 to $9 each, or you can buy your own bird and pluck it naked. The back feathers are long enough, I’d think you could get enough 5″ feathers for a couple of arrows out of one. But how do they hold up and fly, and sound? Better on the wall, methinks.

      Here is what they look like when plucked. Eat ’em if you got ’em.

      attached file
    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Dave,,,,,, simply put, “You ain’t right” hehehehehehe!!!!

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      That looks more like something spawned from a nightmare.

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Looks like a plucked turtle to me.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2544

      Pluckin’ that thing might be as hard on a guy as skinnin’ a live wildcat.

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2261

      Whatever it was before it was plucked, it’s a boy!

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