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    • Idabow
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      Post count: 65

      Ok, I’ve been up elk hunting several times this year and have run into, called and seen several on each occasion. Great news, right? Well, I seem to be suffering from a bout of impatience for I am so focused and want to get one so badly, I know I’m “overcalling” and not staying as still for as long as I need to. It’s like if they don’t come running in (unfortunately this has happened on a couple of occasions) I seem to get antsy and rush it. Remind me of how you all make it work so that next time I’m out hunting, I’ll think twice about calling too often or moving about. It’s been four years since I got my last elk and hope to close the deal in the next two weeks. Good luck to all.

    • T Downing
      Member
      Post count: 233

      Idabow, I understand your predicament. To answer your question, I use a watch to stop me from overcalling. A chirp or two every 7-10 minutes. Unless I hear a response, I do not call, no matter what. In addition, I set up and go through the process no less than 45 minutes a session. Bulls come in silent all the time and I have found that it is beneficial to wait until the time is up before I move. Plus, still hunting in a promising area, (of course having the wind in your face)
      walking quietly, stopping every 10 yards and glassing in front of you is an excellent tactic for hunting elk. I have found that calling can be overrated at times. Particularly in areas where the elk have been pressured. Hope this helps…

    • Idabow
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 65

      Thanks for the response “T”. I like what you have to say, I think this may serve as a great blue print on what I need to be doing but haven’t. These are things that I know and have practiced but it sure helps to have it spelled out by another and to know that it has worked for them. I welcome any other tidbits that any of you may have as I’ll let ya all know how the next two weeks go. Good hunting.

    • strait-aero
      Post count: 350

      I think the most important thing to do while waiting out the game to come your way is to enjoy your surroundinngs and just take in the hunt as one of life’s experiences….. Good luck to you both, and to all of you bow hunters who are fortunate enough to be pursueing elk. It seems that Mr. Downing has given you some sound advice,Idabow. Wayne

    • Nate Bailey
      Post count: 101

      I am exactally the same (thats why I cant tree stand hunt). this year has taught me a bunch, as I have been in elk- almost every time ive been out. I have slowed way down and listened more. I have also picked spots that had fresh sign everywhere–that helps in the slow down part. If you confident that the elk are there its easier to take your time. this year I won’t even mess with a patch of good habitat that isn’t being used, and I have been way more efficient. I dont care how good it looks, if there aint rubs or fresh tracks, Im moving on. I know we are hunting elk, not sign, but the elk ive been on have stayed in the area until something pushed them out. so my advice is go hard until you find a spot they are using then sit on it.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Walking and calling are fun hunting, and as you say they combat boredom. But for killing elk you can’t beat sitting in silence, long boring hours and days, in a place with plenty of recent sign, or several such places. Thomas “T” Downing is the most successful cow-calling elk hunter I’ve known–he called in a bull for me two years ago and had several others going crazy in a place where I hadn’t heard a bugle or seen a bull in nearly a week. But T has the vocal magic and most of us don’t. IMHO

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 415

      also the elk have to want to play. If you are hunting alone that in my mind is the toughest game in town. You need to call and move because when that elk comes he will have you pinpointed down to the exact spot. I have at times gave up and headed back to camp and cow calling and all of a sudden you are in that bulls house and he screams and then he just comes like a train and there he is in your lap. The more time spent in the field your odds increase.

    • Nate Bailey
      Post count: 101

      David Petersen wrote: Walking and calling are fun hunting, and as you say they combat boredom. But for killing elk you can’t beat sitting in silence, long boring hours and days, in a place with plenty of recent sign, or several such places. Thomas “T” Downing is the most successful cow-calling elk hunter I’ve known–he called in a bull for me two years ago and had several others going crazy in a place where I hadn’t heard a bugle or seen a bull in nearly a week. But T has the vocal magic and most of us don’t. IMHO

      This man has forgot more about Elk hunting then I’ll ever know, listen to him!

    • Idabow
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 65

      Thanks for all of your pointers and refreshers, tomorrow I will be putting to use all of skills that I have. A five day hunt in the Idaho wilderness. I’ll let ya’ll know how it goes. Have a good one.

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