Home Forums Campfire Forum Danger of Dragging

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    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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      Post count: 2231

      As a friend of mine said at the start of a group backpack trip quite a few years ago, “none of us is too young to have a heart attack. “

      Hunting season is very near and it’s not too late to get some hikes in to help with conditioning. Fortunately or not, I usually don’t have far to drag a deer. If I kill one farther out this year I think I’ll start quartering and packing.

      I appreciate you posting this article. Science is good. Best, dwc

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 862

      David

      Yes on all your comments, trying to get myself back in shape also. Unless it is real close to the road ( or coues deer and antelope on my back [ downhill mostly haha ]when I was younger/ stronger/ and all my parts worked), I pretty much stopped dragging years ago – qtr and packing is pretty much what I do ( and having the ability to hoist the rest out of harms way — more trips easier traveling. However i was thinking about looking into some of these wheeled carriers ( man powered). Did use a cheap akio type sled once in the snow –a form of dragging , but less straining.

      Scout aka Ray

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
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      Post count: 2231

      A friend of mine uses one of those ice fishing sleds. It makes the drag much easier and he can fit two does in the sled and slide it right into his Prius. How’s that for macho?

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 862

      I like it, good for him. It is interesting how the”akio” even on regular ground makes dragging so much easier. I like the idea of the prius ( my mom had one but didnt drive it enuff to keep the batteries charged. I imagine they’re more reliable now. Wave of the future I am sure. Quieter too.

      Scout aka Ray

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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      Post count: 2231

      I should be so quiet in the woods.

    • Stephen Graf
      Member
      Post count: 2313

      We have a Chevy Bolt electric vehicle.  It goes 250 miles or more on a charge and is a hoot to drive.  My wife doesn’t even remember how to get gas anymore.  When someone comes out with a pickup, I’ll be getting one for myself.

      As for dragging deer, ergonomics are important.  Twisting and dragging takes more energy and injures one’s back.  I made a deer drag from an old ash post hole digger handle.  About 6 feet of rope so the deer can remain fully on the ground is an important trick to easy dragging.  Having to pick up the head/chest is a waste of energy/effort.  Pulling straight, and not lifting the deer makes easy work of the job…  You will note in the following picture that the deer’s head is off the ground.  The para-cord got changed out for a longer piece after that.

      This is one I made for a young man after he killed his first deer:

      It’s a small piece of gear to have on hand all the time, thus making the eventual (but always unexpected) task of bringing home the goods easier.

    • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 897

      Hmmm…I see a Tip of the Week in the making. 😉

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 2231

      Grab em where you can! Steve’s full of them. dwc

       

    • Drew
      Member
      Post count: 6

      I quit dragging in favor of quartering and packing several years ago. I have come close to injuring myself several times trying to drag out deer. I found out about quartering and packing from reading the posts and watching videos by a Louisiana hunter by the name of Warren Womack.  I tried it and never looked back. All I need now is my ALICE pack, a Case Trapper and a hat mounted light (if recovery is after dark) and that is it. I can get it done in 20 minutes at most. I think East of the Mississippi quartering and packing is not a common method but out West is much more well known.

      An unforeseen benefit I have observed from going to this method of retrieval is that I no longer consider how far is too far to hunt from the truck.

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      I use two things similar to Steve’s. If it’s a buck I put one on the base of each antler, if a doe both around the neck. With two I can spread my arms apart if needed or pull more with one than the other.

      It’s rough terrain here so I need two to be able to pull with either or both arm/arms at times.

       

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      Here’s a pic of how to use and a pic of a set I just made. That’s 1″ doweling and para-cord.

      One would need to make the handles to suit one’s hand size, 6″ works for me and the cord length to suit.

      They’re also handy as all get out to help get the animal in the bed of a pickup.

       

       

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 862

      Both home remedy ‘s look like they work good . Much better than just grabbing an antler or horn. I have used a 1″ x 2 ‘ pole and line in the past .

      Scout aka Ray

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