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    • Konrad
      Post count: 62

      I read with great interest the well written article “Carbonated Clothing Caught in the Crosshairs” in North American Hunter’s September 2010 issue. NAHC, please keep up the good work.

      Living far from Minnesota, I had no idea a law suit had been filed disputing advertising claims made by two clothing manufacturers, one of which advertised the ability to “eliminate” human odor.

      Eliminate:
      1. Get rid of something: to put an end to something, usually something undesirable
      They are pledged to eliminate poverty by the end of the century.

      It brings to mind two questions:

      A: Who really thinks spending a thousand dollars (after underwear, socks, pants, bib over-alls, vest, jacket, hat, face mask, gloves, deodorant, toothpaste, gum and oh yes…spray) on a suit of cloths will let them sneak up to a deer any more than spending a thousand dollars on a suit of cloths will let them sneak up on next year’s super model?

      And…

      B: What advertising company expects hard-bitten hunters in America to not put their claims to the test (i.e.” Forget the wind, just hunt”), particularly after dropping a few weeks pay on a set of new duds?

      Recently, I have been seeing TV hosts sitting around their hunting lodges, frying bacon and drinking coffee (and I surmise smoking cigarettes) in their nice new hunting cloths and they really do give the impression you can cast your cares to the wind (no pun intended) after a quick sprtiz of mystery liquid.

      Oh, and by the way…what does “Eliminates 99% of REPLICATED human odor” mean?
      They couldn’t find a stinky human?
      I’ll volunteer my son for testing.
      He needs a job.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2371

      Dude… Your a hoot!

      I can’t get my boy to take a shower without making a scene either.

      I don’t think carbon cloths stand alone as gimmicks in america today. Look at the average woman’s bathroom counter. Count the number of bottles of beauty supplies and see if it has had any effect…:oops:

      I think you need to go hunting and quit worrying about those other guys. Me too.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      Obviously, you’ve not done your homework. After all, carbonated drinks are good! It therefore stands to reason that carbonated clothing is good too. Basic math gets you there. Well that and a sprinkle of gullibility. Well, that plus a desparate longing for a quick fix. Well…add a complete disregard for logic…THEN you can see that it makes COMPLETE sense and you can see for yourself that the technology REALLY does work and you don’t have to take someone else’s word for it. 🙂

    • John Carter
      Post count: 71

      Well carbon filters do work very well,,,,,but every bit of air gets passed through them.
      A carbon suit would have to cover “every” square inch of skin to do the same thing.
      Carbon filters can not be reactivated,,once a set level of air had been passed though them,their history.
      The carbon suit people thought they would catch some folks “which they did” they didn’t think that they would get sued by those same folks once those folks realised they’d been had,,,which they have been.
      Heck,,,if this stuff really worked “every drug courier and every terrorist in town would be shipping their rubbish wrapped in the stuff,,,which they ain’t.
      Some people just deserve what they get:lol:.

    • SteveMcD
      Member
      Post count: 870

      konrad wrote: B: What advertising company expects hard-bitten hunters in America to not put their claims to the test (i.e.” Forget the wind, just hunt”), particularly after dropping a few weeks pay on a set of new duds?.

      What advertizing company? Apparrently none of them. Today’s hunter believes that if spending an extra few dollars will increase their succees at killing a deer. They will spend the money no matter what. And the fact is.. They Do! “A fool and his money are soon parted.”

      I believe these companies have tried unsuccessfully in the past to patent their claims and have failed thus far.

      It’s really more about common sense. Wash clothing in odor free detergent. Keep clean. And hunt the wind!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      A good post, Konrad. Thank you. And Patrick, your genius shines again! By pouring a quart or so of Diet Pepsi (or cheap beer like Coors) other other carbonated beverage over ourselves before going hunting, we can save a thousand bucks! Just watch your backside for bears, and the flies could get a bit bothersome (esp. with the Coors).

      Seriously, to even WANT to try and eleminate all body odor so that we can “just hunt and forget the wind” equals a bold attempt to dumb down hunting to the slobbering idiot level. Happily, it will never happen. What more basic rule for big game hunting can there be beyond “keep the wind in your face and stay downwind of your game.” In fact the only scent we need to worry about minimizing is the residual we leave behind us for hours after we pass through the woods, providing game with a trail of our comings and goings. A few hints. For folks like me who mostly hunt a rescricted area day after day for a month or so, it becomes critical. For those walking around on big public land and always breaking new ground, they can afford to be less concerned. A few hints I’ve used for year for elk. Slight changes will work for deer as well:

      As we move through the woods we transfer body scent to vegetation from every body contact. So do all you can not to contact vegetation by stepping over it, going around it, and packing some pocket-sized Fisker garden snippers and clipping limbs across paths you regularly use. Avoid using your hands to move limbs out of the way or lean on trees for balance — a majority of the scent we leave behind comes from our hands. Have a clean body and clean clothes. Use a cover scent on the fronts and outsides of your pants and shirt or jacket arms and use those arms rather than hands to push limbs aside when you move. And don’t forget your shoe laces! How many of us wear “scent proof” rubber boots, such as the beloved LL Bean Maine Hunting Shoe, yet never give a thought to the tremendous amount of scent we transfer to our shoe laces every time we lace up? Use cover scent. Carry a small foam pad to sit on. It keeps your butt warm and dry and keeps scent off the places you sit. And more. I do these things instinctively and manage to hunt dense woods right in amongst ’em and come and go on the same route every day for a month, and never get busted … any more. In the early days I did stupid things like spray waterproofer onto boots and wondered why all the elk disappeared after a few days. This caution is as critical for tree-stand guys as it is for me. This is woodsmanship vs. technology, bogus or otherwise.

      I’d enjoy hearing from others about non-technical methods of scent control that work for you. Dave

    • George D. Stout
      Post count: 256

      Problem is, we still have a fairly large contingency of “slobbering idiots” to bait into the trap. Add to that the near death nowadays of common sense, and you have the market for just about any mindless project. At one time, nature would have weeded-out many of these customers, but modern medicine has intervened.

      Best method of scent control is to have it drifting away from the shooting area as much as possible. It is, for all intents and purposeses, part of the challenge of the hunt. I guess we can keep working to eliminate all the challenges to the hunt, but somehow that sounds like an oxymoron as it applies to this sport.

      It is rampant, however; you would not believe how many folks leave the sporting goods area at Walmart with carts of C’Mere Deer, Deer Cane, and the like. It’s a large market, not a small one, and the retailers are making sure it is not missed.

    • Konrad
      Post count: 62

      Dave wrote:

      “As we move through the woods we transfer body scent to vegetation from every body contact. So do all you can not to contact vegetation by stepping over it, going around it, and packing some pocket-sized Fisker garden snippers and clipping limbs across paths you regularly use. Avoid using your hands to move limbs out of the way or lean on trees for balance — a majority of the scent we leave behind comes from our hands. Have a clean body and clean clothes. Use a cover scent on the fronts and outsides of your pants and shirt or jacket arms and use those arms rather than hands to push limbs aside when you move. And don’t forget your shoe laces! How many of us wear “scent proof” rubber boots, such as the beloved LL Bean Maine Hunting Shoe, yet never give a thought to the tremendous amount of scent we transfer to our shoe laces every time we lace up? Use cover scent. Carry a small foam pad to sit on. It keeps your butt warm and dry and keeps scent off the places you sit. And more. I do these things instinctively and manage to hunt dense woods right in amongst ’em and come and go on the same route every day for a month, and never get busted … any more. In the early days I did stupid things like spray waterproofer onto boots and wondered why all the elk disappeared after a few days. This caution is as critical for tree-stand guys as it is for me.”

      It is funny how a decade of failures can be compiled into a one paragraph!

      By following simple procedures, game can be had at reasonable ranges. The “trick” is in the understanding of the procedures.

      I view this in the same way as my Christian faith. If you read The Book, you come away with a very simple Salvation. People can’t believe how simple it truly is and so they complicate it with rules, regulations and labels.

      My own scent procedure includes storing my cloths (after air drying) in a garbage bag that has Adler and Cedar twigs with leaves and keeping the rubber boots far from the garage and house.
      Even if it didn’t help, I like the Cedar scent.

      If I could just keep the wood peckers away!

    • Van/TX
      Post count: 34

      Agree with David. Coors should not be mistaken for beer and should not be taken internally…Van

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      I think we can save a lot of money by watching the wind?????
      If you don’t have the wind you don’t have the game?

      Jim Corbett taught us years ago to watch the wind in Maneaters of Cumaon.
      He said that by keeping the wind blowing across him he could basicaly ignore the down wind side from the man eating Tigers he was hunting.
      Frank

    • NavySkyPilot
      Post count: 29

      Please send your Coors (Gold can , not light) to me.
      I’ll use it to choke down a few Kingston Char-Coals with a Diet Pepsi chaser before I hit the woods.
      PS- I don’t use the easy light (just in case I break wind).
      I don’t believe a flame thrower is a legal means of taking game in North Carolina, maybe Texas?

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