Home Forums Campfire Forum Can you consistently hit a paper plate?

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  • tigertradtigertrad
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    Post count: 25

    We’d all like to think: “Of course I can!”

    Some will debate whether hitting a paper plate — say a regular 9-inch model — is not nearly good enough to be hunting live game.  Many of those will not be using traditional equipment, however.  But, others will say that we owe a responsibility to the animals we hunt to, at least, have this level of proficiency at whatever distance we shoot. I’m NOT talking about legislated tests.  I merely believe we trad shooters should simply stay within our own abilities, as established individually, regarding the situations and distances where we would loose an arrow at game.  Of course, practice is the way to guide us in our abilities and build our accuracy, consistency and confidence to determine how far and when we shoot.

    We can do this alone at a range, or shooting stumps in the woods, or at 3D tournments in friendly competition with our brethren.  To this end, I know of a friendly competition that you can participate in easily, starting today, involving 20 shots at a paper plate from 20 yards.  It’s on another site, founded by a dedicated traditional archer.  May be a fun opportunity to do a self-check in friendly competition with fellow traditional archers.

    Here’s a link:

    http://barbeearchery.boards.net/thread/365/traditional-bowhunter-proficiency-valentine-challenge

    So happens I won last year’s first go-round of the challenge.  Fun deal. Try if you like.

    Tigertrad

    Ellis

  • richard roop
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    Post count: 88

    I take a simpler approach.

    Paper plate on the bales. One arrow at 5 yards. Hit the plate …… go to 10 yards. Hit the plate……. go to 15.  Keep moving back 5 yards at a time until I miss one.  Farthest I’ve ever gotten back was the 70 yard line. Usually miss one before that though.

    Makes a good exercise to alternate with form drills.

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
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    Post count: 782

    Tiger and Richard

    All good stuff – and Imho- the stay in the paper plate ( 8 1/2 -9″) is a good realistic goal. I also think competition is excellent, as it teaches shooting under stress. Especially, if there are contests nearby, or you have enough friends to set up a match.

    What I mostly do anymore is compete with myself ( haha ). I endeavor to keep my hits on whatever spot I have picked on the target and within a fist of that marks center.  I rarely shoot from the same distance/ position twice in a row. Each arrow shot from a different range ( although I sometimes shoot groups for form exercise). When I start practice working up to the season opener, I shoot at tgts similar in thoracic size to the game . I also have these suspended at the proper height from the ground for that animal- thus helping my mind to place it in the proper perspective if you will, to enhance my instinctive shooting style. When shooting at these tgts I have nothing on them as an aiming point, forcing me to pick a spot low center. Sometimes I have put a line forming a shoulder which helps me practice shooting right behind same.  I also like roving , stump shooting whenever possible. I am lucky to have my backyard range in a little canyon so can practice some uphill/ downhill shots.

    Scout

     

  • Daniel Klee
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    Post count: 1

    A game that my good friend and I play with each other is; we attach one of those 1 inch key rings to my Glendale 3D target then at different distances and angles, we make a friendly competition (we never ever get mad at each other or ourselves), by saying who ever hits the ring first, the other has to kiss (somebody we used to work with). Or we would have to do some other thing like that with her. I know…I know. It was a personality issue. She absolutely hated men. Maybe it’s not right but it sure made us focus closely. After all, neither one of us wanted to kiss Gretchen, or do anything else with her. But anyhow, by doing this often for several years, it sure helped our focus, however, we realize that still isn’t the same as hunting a live animal that moves around. Now when I look at any target, I’m looking for that little key ring.

  • richard roop
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    Post count: 88

    Games ???

    Well, as long as it’s getting warm outside …………….. This is more of a ‘Re-entry’ thing for a club, but if you & your shooting partner have the room & the inclination, go for it;

    You’ll need something like a couple of swingset frames without the swings.  Place one on the shooting line and one out about 30 or 40 yards.  Hang a couple of water-balloons for targets with fishline to a couple of more balloons from the frame over the shooting line with something like a sharp wire under the balloons. The fishline should cross so that if the balloon on the left side is shot, the balloon on the right drops, and vice-versa.  Now, you and your buddy stand next to each other and on the count, start shooting. Break your balloon first and your buddy gets wet.  Be slow or inaccurate and you get wet.  Adds a bit more challenge to shoot-offs, too.

    I take my shooting very seriously but hey, if you can’t have a bit of fun now & then ……………….

  • tigertradtigertrad
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    Post count: 25

    I’m sorry it’s just now warming up for some of  y’all, but I’ve already mowed my grass twice down here in Texas! 🙂

    Best use of paper-plate proficiency, to me, is self-regulation and motivation to get better.  Keep shooting whatever yardage you need to to keep all the arrows on the plate — really most should be withing the six-inch ring. If hunting, figure out a way to mark the outside distance your “money” at and make that YOUR kill zone distance.  Simple.  Clean kills, Short tracks. Fresh meat.

     

  • richard roop
    Member
    Post count: 88

    I would like to toss one more thing out for consideration.

    Let’s say that you can constantly nail a paper plate 9 out of 10 at 30 yards or 8 out of 10 at 35 yards.  That’s great!! But ….. there’s a profound difference between the skill level at the range on a fine sunny day and what happens out in the field with cold shooting muscles, wind, sun in your eyes, unknown yardage, and a critter that’s ready to bolt before you’re ready to shoot.  I carry a 10 arrow bowquiver. (I can hear the eyebrows going up) Six hunting broadheads, two small game arrows and two expendable roving arrows. Shots taken with those roving stumpers can make a big difference when the shot’s ‘for real’.

     

     

  • aeronut
    Member
    Post count: 157

    I go a different approach at times.  Instead of taking shots at my 3D targets from various places around the yard I have some other targets hanging around.  I tied some plastic water and soda bottles to some tree limbs so they can swing in the breeze and shoot at them with blunts.  Doesn’t take long to get the windage right, so to speak.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VINLEUa-O4I

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    I’ve seen videos on cold shots and do it myself as part of my practice. On the way to my target I stand on a stone and shoot a little downhill into a dirt bank about 15-18 yards away. I just pick a leaf or a clump of grass and make that my cold shot. Nearly every shot on game is taken after some period of motionless waiting. I think this type if practice is a good reality check. Best, dwc

     

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    Another thought on the paper plate. That’s a fine margin for putting one in the boiler room of a deer. However, I’d put a dot in the middle of that plate. You’re goal of course will be to reduce the size of the plate needed. Good to shoot well enough to hit a squirrel when a deer walks in. Staying focused enough to pick a spot on that big deer is my problem.  Dwc

  • RalphRalph
    Moderator
    Post count: 2494

    Like the old adage, pick three hairs and shoot at one………………..

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    I like it. Problem is, sometimes ones from the tail and the other from the chin…

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
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    Dwc – Ralph , and all members

    I go back and forth on wether it is preferable to shoot at blank targets ( of various sizes imitating game ) to force myself to pick a spot, or use of an artificial aiming point ( paper plate). I realize if you group your arrows in the correct area you have a self made aiming point. At least the first shots are at a spot i have to pick. I also have a number of tgts at the back stop, at varying heights off the ground to make me adjust my aim etc. Currently I am preferring the blank tgt set up. Your thoughts

    Scout aka Ray

     

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    Hey Scout, I also have a variety of things to shoot at. I put up small targets, about the size of a silver dollar, that I can see well enough to focus on at 20 yards +.  I also will put up a leaf on the bale and sometimes just the plain bale. The plain ball is not to be confused with blank bale shooting, which I also like to do to work on specific aspects of form. With the plane bale with no pinned on targets, I get to pick a spot among many spots to focus on, which is similar to a deer.  I also have a few feed bags stuffed with old tarps and billboard material. I have those by my elevated practice stand. They are just plain so I’m picking a spot within the shape where I want to arrow to go. With any one of these, except blank bale, I’m picking a specific spot to shoot at. Aim small.  This reminds me of a Byron Ferguson quote, I think. The center of an aspirin is exactly the same size as the center of a basketball. dwc

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
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    Dwc

    Yes, I too prefer tgts sized similar to the game (like your feed bag set up) I am training for- plus I like to place them at a ( average) proper height off the ground for said critter. This helps me simulate all aspects of the hunting shot at game for instinctive shooting ( at least i like to hope so )- which I do.

    Ferguson quote is great- one of those easy to do in theory – but difficult in practice , at least for me.

    Scout aka Ray

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    Alway easy in theory!  I agree to trying to make it as realistic as possible. I like to shoot off the elevated stand, which is just a ladder stand of sorts made from PT 2x4s with a nice wide platform. It’s only about 8′ but that’s the usual height I put my stands with a few a little higher, but not much. dwc

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
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    Post count: 782

    Good practice set up – sounds like to me —

    I am mostly a ground blind/ stand hunter these days. My range is in a small steep little Arroyo behind my house – allows me to shoot some uphill/ downhill shots, just in case.

    Scout aka Ray

     

    • tigertradtigertrad
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      That’s great — to be able to shoot up and down elevation shots in and around a ditch like that.  My archery club here on the edge of the Texas Hill Country has terrain with lots of cuts and elevation change on a 3D course set up year-round.  And I also like the ladder blind built by DWC.  Anything that makes the practice more realistic is a good thing, I believe.  There is always plenty to go wrong in the real situation, and practicing for as many of the variables as you can has to help.

  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    Scout, what I love about this traditional archery business is that it’s fun all year. Looking at what went wrong or right last year and trying to tune it in to better your chances next season. Focus on the process, right?

  • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
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    Dwc

    You bet – exactly-  fun every day

    Scout aka Ray

  • RalphRalph
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    Post count: 2494

    One thing about it, my arrow is always in the hole where I put it.

    Picking and putting that hole with the arrow in it, in the right place consistently, seems to be the daily challenge.

    Some days I’m really good at hitting a moving hole (it moves all over the target).   :-)) Others, the planned hole is made.   :-)))))

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Ralph.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Ralph.
  • David CoulterDavid Coulter
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    Post count: 2189

    Holy targets, bowman!  Thanks to gravity, at least you know they’re gonna hit!

  • richard roop
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    Post count: 88

    Yeah but on my range, gravity can’t always be trusted. It fluctuates and some days is stronger than other days.  That’s gotta be the reason why my arrows go high or low ………………………yes ???

  • RalphRalph
    Moderator
    Post count: 2494

    May also explain a backwards compass , y’spose????   I love logical scientific solutions……..

  • richard roop
    Member
    Post count: 88

    I can deal with gravity that fluctuates; As Cal Vogt used to say, ‘If the arrows go high, look low in the spot. If they go low, look high in the spot.’

    But a compass that can’t be trusted …………………….. That just ain’t right.

  • RalphRalph
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    Post count: 2494

    I got my Texas Atlas out the other day to see where a city that one of the grandsons was curious about as to where it was located.

    You talk about getting strange looks…………………………

    Wonder what woulda happened had I given him an old road map to refold????    :-))))

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