Home Forums Bows and Equipment Brand new bow. Is there a problem?

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    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Post count: 300

      Ok fellas. I need your help. 😥

      I just brought home a new longbow I had made by a reputable bowyer. I’ve been playing with it to tune this past week but not too much as I was waiting for SBD string order to come so I could dress the bow the way I want and really fine tune from there…anyway, I happen to be giving it the once over and found when braced the upper limb doesn’t seem to have near the reflex/deflex of the lower (oh yeah, it’s a r/d longbow, 54″ 60#@27″). In fact it’s almost a smooth arc from riser to tip. The lower limb, however, has a definite r/d bend to it. ( wish I knew how to post pix 👿 ). Also, it appears that the distance from limb to string is much narrower on the lower limb then the upper? Shouldn’t it be even?

      I contacted my bowyer, who really is a great guy and makes some wonderful bows (don’t want to say who as I don’t want to sully his rep at all) and he did say he’d be glad to take a look at it and gladly fix any issues but he also said what I am seeing is certainly possible with shorter, heavier bows:?:

      I’m still relatively new to this…

      What do you all think? Opinions are certainly welcomed:!:

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      Some bowyers deliberately build a bow with a shorter, stronger bottom limb. Did you fill out a form before you bought the bow where you noted whether you shoot split finger or 3 under?

      The way I was taught to make bows was that a mild r/d bow when strung shouldn’t look reflexed to most people. The reflex needs to be working when.

      If the lower limb is in fact shorter and stronger, the r/d should be more pronounced when strung which would mean that the string is closer to the limb.

      Im sure another more experienced user will chime in with more info.

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 300

      Hey Giggle

      I didn’t fill anything out but did have a conversation and told him I’m a split finger shooter…

      Does that matter. I’ve heard/read a lot where it supposedly doesn’t …:roll:

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      John, returning the bow to the bowyer is the right thing to do. If he’s reputable, as you say, his pride in his work will make things right. You didn’t mention how she shoots? A new bow is such a rare and special thrill for most of us, that we should be fully satisfied with no lingering doubts. I’m betting he will either make it right, or explain why it is how it is. I’ve never heard of r/d on one limb and not the other, but can’t imagine that any establish bowyer would sell a bow that was that obviously “off.” Best luck.

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 300

      That’s the killer. I’ve not shot a lot, nor have I really fully tuned her. It’s been shooting real well Dave. I’m close to being tuned, great arrow flight so far (GrizStik Alaskans currently cut 30″ w 315gr field points) Just off a bit ( arrows hitting to right of target line by maybe an inch / inch 1/2 with occasional mock kicked left ).

      I feel like it looks “off” but seems to shoot real well… And he has been great about looking at it. He’s out of town this week which, as u know from my other post, is fine with me :D. In fact, I pulled in tonight to 4 deer in front yard, owl perched on my barn and you could hear coyotes lighting up my side and the other side of the lake!

      I did bring the bow with me to continue bare shafting a bit 8)

    • SUSAN
      Member
      Post count: 20

      Most bows are “in tiller” when the bottom limb is anywhere from 1/16″ to 3/16″ closer to the string, measured at the fadeout, than the upper limb. This is because the center of the bow is not at the center of the handle. Still, if you think there is a problem, send it back, or at least have a conversation with your bowyer. These things niggle at you if you don’t get them straightened out to your satisfactiobn.

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 300

      That’s the thing. I love the bow and as Dave said, a new bow, especially one I designed w the bowyer, is a “rare and special thrill” AND the killer is, she shooting pretty sweet!8). I still have quite a bit of work to do but even with the work yet to be done, you can tell she going to be a shooter. No stack, smooth, no handshock in a 54″ 60# bow!!

      I’ve read/heard quite a bit that this is a fairly common occurrence where each limb not necessarily symmetrical. Assume can’t hurt the bow…:shock::?:

      Just little things like this can keep u awake at night 😆

    • bruc
      Member
      Post count: 476

      Posting a picture here might help answer some of the questions.

      Bruce

    • jmsmithy
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 300

      Have pix on my iPhone. Just don’t know how to get them on here? 😳

    • Robin ConradsRobin Conrads
      Admin
      Post count: 907

      Jmsmithy, I tried uploading a photo from my iPhone as an attachment below and the file was too big. I had to use an app from Photobucket, but you can choose any photo sharing app that you like. Posted instructions in that thread over at the Campfire forum, but you can always send the picture to me at webmaster@tradbow.com and I’ll post it for you. 😀

    • Catamount
      Member
      Post count: 5

      Measure the bow from the fadeout area of the riser on the belly towards the string. My guess is it will be 1/4″ or less on the bottom limb. The bow is not right as having one limb considerably stiffer than the other will throw the timing of the limbs off. The limbs need to unload at the same time and rate.

    • wildschwein
      Post count: 581

      Jmsmithy I understand your concern completely, but since you say the bow is shooting well, perhaps you should give it a trial run. I say tune her up and take it stumping/squirrelin a few times, and then decide.

      “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. A good shooting bow definately ain’t broke.

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