Home Forums Campfire Forum BOW ARM TECHNIQUE QUESTION

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    • NV_STICKBOW
      Post count: 6

      Hi all,
      I’m new to trad and archery altogether and I have a question about my bow arm position. I was reading in another forum that another newbie found that locking his bow arm elbow produced better accuracy. Does this sound right? I have had my arm slightly cocked. I’ve heard that trad shooters normally cock the arm while locking the arm is normally a compound technique. What are you all doing?

    • Clay Hayes
      Member
      Post count: 418

      I’ve never really paid attention. I’ll take note next time I shoot.

      ch

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      I would describe my arm position as relaxed, which probably sounds strange. I don’t lock my arm, but I know some do. I think the best way to describe it is to say that my elbow is in the exact same position when I shoot as it is when I let my arm just completely relax (as in NOT holding it up, just relaxed, and to my side). Hope that makes sense.

    • Bert
      Post count: 164

      Hello and welcome NV- Locking any part of your body is a bad thing! Compounders, because of their equipment set-up, tend to stand at 90 degrees to the target while trad guys and gals have a more open stance and cant the bow more or less, depending on your physique, from the vertical.
      By all means get some manuals on form- T.J.Conrads, Byron Ferguson, Brian Sorrells and my favorite on the physical aspects, Anthony Camera’s ‘Shooting the Stickbow’, who goes into very detailed muscle and tendon groups and their role in drawing, holding and releasing an arrow in a disciplined relaxed, consistent manner. And there are some good DVD’s out there that perhaps some others on this forum could recommend.
      Remember, when you perfect your release, you will have accomplished what no archer in history has done!
      So concentrate on correct form until it is ‘natural’, as in any physical activity, and then you can focus on making your arrow hit where you want- well at least, most of the time- now why in the hell did that arrow go there!
      Good shooting-Bert

    • tom-wisconsin
      Post count: 239

      With the bow arm making sure your grip is relaxed is important. I think it is easier to remember this when you have a relaxed elbo as Patrick was describing. Holding the bow arm very still during the shot is most important. Practice with only these things in mind and don’t add in where the arrow ends up. Just focus on holding the arm and hand still. Do not worry about being in the bullseye. Repeat this all week and then get back to us. I am going to do the same thing.

      Great talking with you.

      Tom

    • Bloodless
      Post count: 103

      NV — good question. I too have never really paid attention. Maybe you should simply try both and see which comes most naturally and delivers best accuracy shot after shot. Bodies are built different, one to another. The single most important tip for just starting out is not to overbow. Get all this basic stuff worked out without pain, and don’t rush it. Then up the poundage a bit at a time so far as it doesn’t cramp your proven successful form. All advice above looks sound to me. Just another angle.

    • MOUNTAINSLICKER
      Post count: 45

      There are excellent books out there that explain it much better but relaxed tension is what I call it. The upper body should form a letter T. That way the bones are doing the work instead of trying to muscle it in place. Locked arm means locked release hand. One part of the body will do whatever another part is doing. I think they can it sympathetic response. Anyway a relaxed release hand will mean a relaxed bow hand. No relax no clean release.

    • MOUNTAINSLICKER
      Post count: 45

      Possible the people were trying to say cant the bow instead of what you thought they were trying to say.

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      Generally speaking, a slightly relaxed bow arm is better. Compound or stickbow, most of the best archers I know do not shoot with a locked bow arm. But there are exceptions. For example, Butch Johnson — arguably the best US Olympic Archer today (alongside Vic Wunderle) — shots with his bow arm nearly hyper-extended.

    • Patrick
      Member
      Post count: 1148

      J.Wesbrock wrote: But there are exceptions. For example, Butch Johnson — arguably the best US Olympic Archer today (alongside Vic Wunderle) — shots with his bow arm nearly hyper-extended.

      As I recall from “Masters of the Barebow”, I think Roger Rothaar does too.

    • rebstud
      Post count: 54

      Bert wrote: Hello and welcome NV- Locking any part of your body is a bad thing! Compounders, because of their equipment set-up, tend to stand at 90 degrees to the target while trad guys and gals have a more open stance and cant the bow more or less, depending on your physique, from the vertical.
      By all means get some manuals on form- T.J.Conrads, Byron Ferguson, Brian Sorrells and my favorite on the physical aspects, Anthony Camera’s ‘Shooting the Stickbow’, who goes into very detailed muscle and tendon groups and their role in drawing, holding and releasing an arrow in a disciplined relaxed, consistent manner. And there are some good DVD’s out there that perhaps some others on this forum could recommend.
      Remember, when you perfect your release, you will have accomplished what no archer in history has done!
      So concentrate on correct form until it is ‘natural’, as in any physical activity, and then you can focus on making your arrow hit where you want- well at least, most of the time- now why in the hell did that arrow go there!
      Good shooting-Bert

      Yeah what he said!!!

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