Home Forums Campfire Forum Boots For The Bold

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      I just finished reading Boots For The Bold by Aram Barsch,pg 78 Dec/Jan 2011. In the article he mentions using Toilet Ring Wax for waterproofing boots. He gives credit to Gene Wensel for the idea.
      Well living in Montana where we get snow a good part of the year I’m always keeping an ear tuned for a superior boot waterproofing. I’ve use Montana Pitch Blend for years with pretty good results. However I did go to the hardware store today & bought a Toilet Wax Ring to try.
      Has anyone else used this wax for waterproofing boots? If so how did it work? I’m going to try it & see. I’d be interested in hearing from anybody else who has used it.
      Thanks Frank

    • William Warren
      Member
      Post count: 1384

      No, but I’ve changed a wax seal or two. Doggone sticky stuff. I bet if you hit it with a blow dryer after application it will soak in like Snow Seal, another wax based treatment.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Frank — let us know how it works in the field. I think it’s beeswax with some other stuff in it. Can’t recall an odor but that could be important. MT Pitch Blend has a nice piney smell that doesn’t seem to bother game one whit. dp

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      Well Ok I’m going to be the Guina Pig.

      I went down & bought a ring of it & after leaving it in the warmest room in the house(it was -2 most of the day) it warmed up enough to put it on my boots. I got them all greased up & put them in a cupboard that is pretty warm. I’m anxious to see how well it’ll soak in. I used a tooth brush to put it on the seams (NO NOT THE SAME ONE I USE ON MY TEETH!):lol:

      This is pretty sticky stuff & I think it’ll work. Hope Gene isn’t having a huge laugh on my account! 😀 I’ll report after I use the boots.

      Right now I’m using my Sorell Packs outdoors!
      Frank

      PS: David, after putting it on a pair of boots & my hands, I don’t detect any real smell!

    • shawhill
      Post count: 63

      Frank H V wrote: PS: David, after putting it on a pair of boots & my hands, I don’t detect any real smell!

      Thats because you used a new one! 😀

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      shawhill wrote: [quote=Frank H V]PS: David, after putting it on a pair of boots & my hands, I don’t detect any real smell!

      Thats because you used a new one! 😀

      YOU CAN BE SURE I USED A NEW ONE!:o

      Frank

    • Chad Sivertsen
      Post count: 84

      Hi Frank, how ya doin?

      I too am interested in the outcome of the wax ring experiment.

      Darn cold here in NW Montana also.

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      Chad Sivertsen wrote: Hi Frank, how ya doin?

      I too am interested in the outcome of the wax ring experiment.

      Darn cold here in NW Montana also.

      Chad, I’m doing pretty well. Haven’t gotten anything this year except two Franklin Grouse (with a bow) but have seen a lot of Moose. Lot’s of fun.

      I waxed up a pair of boots, but it’s going to have to warm up a bit before I wear them. It’s been below zero here for the past couple days & that’s Sorell time for me.
      I’ll post as soon as I try them.
      Frank

    • steveschrank
      Post count: 5

      i don’t know about boots but my boyer ron king said to use that stuf on my 2 pease bow

      attached file
    • Treetopflier
      Post count: 146

      Sure would be cool if there’s a plumber or such among us who can inform us what’s in these rings except wax. ❓

    • shawhill
      Post count: 63

      Most toilet rings are now made of a petroleum based wax with a real tacky and greasy feel. The old beeswax ones are rare and If you did find one that says beeswax I would imagine its only a certain percentage. Some seals also have anti-microbial chemicals imbedded in them to prevent molds and mildews, these types are the only ones that require an MSDS sheet so I imagine the regular ones are just everyday petro wax.

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      Steve, Did Ron say how to use it? Heat it & wipe it on? Is that a Breed or Longbow? Fox bows are great.
      Frank

    • Fallguy
      Member
      Post count: 317

      I find that Obenauf’s oil and paste work very well for me. Anything that rides on the surface is going to rub off sooner or later so I want to condition the leather so it doesn’t dry out.

    • MontanaFord
      Post count: 450

      I know that the folks at the Army Navy here in Kalispell, where I bought my Danner boots, highly recommended the Obenauf’s boot treatment. It’s done good for me, thus far. The last pair of boots I had, I didn’t take very good care of, so they wore out real fast. The pair I have now, I intend to take much better care of, because 300 bucks for a pair of boots is a big chunk of change to waste.

      Michael.

    • Snakeeater
      Post count: 23

      Putting the waxed up boots in a warm oven with the door ajar will help melt the wax and get it to be absorbed by the leather of the boot. I think the Snoseal instructions say to leave it in for 30 minutes.

    • brownk
      Post count: 1

      I have been wearing Danner boots for almost 20 years. I have used Obenaufs for the last three. It is good stuff and my Danners hold up much better with it than anything else that I have tried.

    • Larry O. Fischer
      Post count: 92

      Forty years ago I purchased my first pair of White brand boots and followed the instructions from the retailer to only used Sno-Seal. After a couple of months the leather started to dry out and split. Whites looked them over and determined that I had starved the leather of oil, the retailer was not to happy when he had to buy me a new set of $100 boots.
      You need to use something that has both a wax and oil blend, Montana Pitch Blend or Obenaufs are two that come to mind.

    • Frank H V
      Post count: 129

      Well I’ve worn my boots several times now in the snow. I can’t see that the wax is wearing off, but I’m not sure it’s treating the leather either. It didn’t soak in & I put them in a cupboard near the heater for several days. I’ll see what develops later after I’ve used them more.
      Frank

    • Chiloquin
      Post count: 56

      Larry O. Fischer wrote: Forty years ago I purchased my first pair of White brand boots and followed the instructions from the retailer to only used Sno-Seal. After a couple of months the leather started to dry out and split. Whites looked them over and determined that I had starved the leather of oil, the retailer was not to happy when he had to buy me a new set of $100 boots.
      You need to use something that has both a wax and oil blend, Montana Pitch Blend or Obenaufs are two that come to mind.

      Wow a $100 pair of Whites–Wish I could find a deal like that!I usta wear them when I worked in the woods. I have two pairs of Danners, one highly insulated and the other has no insulation at all! I wish they still made the Old Pronghorn as the new ones don’t look like they will hold up! In the wet snowy stuff you can’t beat my muck boots, and wool socks!

    • Larry O. Fischer
      Post count: 92

      Yes, those were the good old days, my last pair was almost $400. But, not too bad for an handmade american made boot that can be rebuilt numerous times.

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.