Home Forums Bows and Equipment Bison Gear Packs

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    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Anyone else using them? I have been using the wool Outfitter for the past 8 mos. or so, and I really like it for times when I don’t need to carry a ton of stuff with me (though it will hold a surprising amount for its size). I’d recommend getting the back straps if you’re considering the Outfitter, its large enough that carrying all the weight on your hips, if you fully load it up, could be a little unwieldy.

      It’s also the quietest pack I have ever used. Unlike most synthetic material packs I’ve tried, which inevitably seem to create varying amounts of noise as you move, the Bison pack is completely silent. Workmanship is excellent, and all done in the USA.

      Not the best pic, but here it is:

      I’ll post a few more detail pics when I get a chance. In the meantime, if you have one, lets see it.

    • 1shot
      Post count: 252

      I like the open camo design and it being made of wool… I used something in that style when I hunted the Adirondaks in NY, very comfortable and they hold a lot of gear.. To small for me though anymore,optics,first aid, side arm, etc. I have a couple of Badlands, Diablo and the super day pack, I may need them to carry a Coues deer or Lion off the MT…( I de-bone on site, wrap meat in a shamag, head/hide rolled-up and tied to outside)

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Looking forward to more pics Bruce. Is it basically a belt rig with shoulder straps?

    • 1shot
      Post count: 252

      Yeah Jim, kinda like an ‘H” rig but with a hunters features in mind, silent material, a lot easyer to shoot a bow with this style then a normal backpack…

      I might have to look into these…

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      1shot wrote: To small for me though anymore,optics,first aid, side arm, etc. I have a couple of Badlands, Diablo and the super day pack, I may need them to carry a Coues deer or Lion off the MT…( I de-bone on site, wrap meat in a shamag, head/hide rolled-up and tied to outside)

      Here’s what I typically carry in mine:

      first aid kit

      sharpening kit (strop/sandpaper)

      1 – 2 liter water bladder

      2nd sheath knife

      ‘game kit’ – 2 game bags, 30′ 9mm cord, rubber gloves

      extra layer (usually rolled up and strapped to the top of the pack)

      various snacks

      camera

      warm hat

      light rain jacket

      calls/wind powder

      compass

      bear spray

      ’emergency kit’ – tinder, lighter/firesteel, chemical handwarmers, heat reflector sheet, etc.

      Even later in the season, I don’t need to carry much more than that, and if so, I just transfer some of the smaller stuff to my cargo pockets, etc. If you use a drop/thigh holster it doesn’t seem to interfere at all with a firearm. Keep in mind that this is their smallest pack, too. I recently purchased an add-on pouch that they offer for a little additional capacity.

      ausjim wrote: Looking forward to more pics Bruce. Is it basically a belt rig with shoulder straps?

      Basically, yeah. Here’s a stock pic from their site that gives a better idea until I can get some more pics:

    • Doc Nock
      Post count: 1150

      I don’t own one, but knew Angelo before he bought Bison some m any years back… and everyone I do know w ho owns one, loves theirs…regardless of the style or size.

      I have a friend with one for sale, but I don’t use such a big pack or I’d not get where I’m going… bad enough with what I do take…

      Never heard of anyone who didn’t like them…fwiw

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Looks good Bruce. I’m quite partial to belt rigs. If I don’t have to take silly military gear in mine I can comfortably overnight out of my belt rig, which I have done on a number of occasions. That’s in ok weather though.

      The soft felty material looks whisper quiet. Most of the military belt rigs now have a MOLLE section on the back of the shoulder straps so you can attach a camelback. Do you know if these guys offer anything like that?

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A few more pics, as promised:

      Side view showing the ample hip pockets:

      With a jacket rolled up and strapped to the top of the pack (straps are included):

      Interior shot of the main compartment, showing the zip pocket under the lid, key clip, and the attached interior organizer (green nylon):

      Another shot of the organizer, which partially flips out:

      And here is the full pack, with the “survival pouch” that I recently purchased to add a little more capacity. The pouch has two heavy duty nylon straps and snaps on the back, that can attach to the backstraps, and still leaves room for me to strap down a layer on top of the pack without issue. Angelo mentioned last time I talked to him that the newer version of the Outfitter has d-rings on the top lid for mating to this pouch, or their larger accessory pocket they offer, called the the “Hump Cell:”

      One additional thing I’d like to find to complete this set up is a small sil-nylon dry sack with a webbing daisy chain. That way I can keep whatever additional layers I need in it, and just throw it on the pack and strap it to the lid when needed. I like the “modular” approach.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      ausjim wrote:

      The soft felty material looks whisper quiet. Most of the military belt rigs now have a MOLLE section on the back of the shoulder straps so you can attach a camelback. Do you know if these guys offer anything like that?

      Jim –

      Not sure if they offer a hydration bladder attachment of any kind (but it’s worth giving them a call). When I’ve used one with my pack, I simply put the bladder in my pack, and run the tube up and over one of the backstraps. Works fine.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      A little more detail about the BG “survival pouch:”

      Next to a shooting glove for scale:

      The inside of the pouch opens up and flips out. There is also an interior zippered pocket (r. side):

      And here’s an idea of the amount of stuff I carry in it:

      As I said above, I really like the ‘modular’ approach. By having all my little essentials in one pouch, I can easily move it to different packs as needed, without having to unpack things and repack them. Just makes switching gears on the fly a lot easier.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Nice to hear the great reviews as I just ordered the first trip explorer model a couple of weeks ago–it hasn’t arrived yet. Meet Angelo at ETAR and was impressed with his gear.

      Likely I will now carry stuff that I will never use:D forgetting that Lakota mantra.

      Bruce neat to see a signalling mirror in your pouch–I thought I was the only one that still carried one of those.

      Will post a review when it arrives

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      colmike wrote: Nice to hear the great reviews as I just ordered the first trip explorer model a couple of weeks ago–it hasn’t arrived yet. Meet Angelo at ETAR and was impressed with his gear.

      Will post a review when it arrives

      Mike –

      Looking forward to seeing the review on the ‘First Trip.’ While I have no business buying another pack for some time, I have been curious about that model and/or the ‘Lost River’ for times when I need a more full-size day pack. I’m very impressed with their stuff, and I really like the fact that it’s all made in the US – as we all know, that’s a hard thing to find anymore.

      colmike wrote: Bruce neat to see a signalling mirror in your pouch–I thought I was the only one that still carried one of those.

      One of those things I’ve carried in my pack since I was a kid – I had it drilled into me at an early age to always have a knife, always have a way to start a fire, and always have a signalling device (or two). I use the first one all the time, have needed the second on a few occasions, and have never needed the third (yet), but it’s a lightweight piece of insurance in case I ever do…:D

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 413

      Smith I have had mine for at least 20 yrs and is by far my favorite pack. They were called pack Idaho before moving to Missoula. I have had side pouches added to mine which I really like. I think my pack was called the Lemhi. Everything about this pack was built to last , it’s tough and comfy.

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Bruce

      Trust you have practiced with it–not on airplanes–as I found out many years ago. Have actually used mine for enticing hawks and crows to ground try it. Mine comes from survival kit I was issued about 40 years ago. Oh yeah it makes a neat fire starter with dry tinder and sun.

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 413

      sorry smith I have the 1st trip but I think it was the lemhi and I had those side pouches put on later which I like for light stuff like game bags

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Wahoo – good to hear from you, and 20 years out of a pack is impressive! Love to see a pic of it if/when you have a chance. Hope your season has been good! Might try to make it over your way for chukar sometime in the next few weeks…

    • coastalbendbows
      Post count: 120

      I looked at them but I just needed a full sized pack. That would make for a sweet day tripper

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Bruce not to change the thread but your display of items prompted my thought that a light was missing or I missed it. Anyway check out this link.

      http://www.rei.com/product/838548/petzl-elite-headlamp

      When cleaning the kill or running dogs when you need a hands free lite this is the best we have found. We do use a larger one for night runs with large teams–leaders 63 feet in front of me or in blizzard conditions–but for what trad hunters need for after the kill it works. The red option is nice when needed. About the size of a large quarter on your head.

      Mike

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 413

      Smith mine is grn – When I have a minute I will shoot you a photo- hell if you come to Salmon town you can see it yourself – stay at the house and you can buy me a soda pop.

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      colmike wrote: Bruce not to change the thread but your display of items prompted my thought that a light was missing or I missed it. Anyway check out this link.

      Mike

      Thanks, Mike. There is a small Fenix handheld flashlight in that pic (which is way brighter than its size would indicate) that I carry as my backup light, but I also carry a headlamp in my pack, just forgot to put it in the pic. Right now I’m using a Princeton Tec ‘Remix’ and its been a good light. I’ve had a few Petzls in the past, and they’re usually good quality too. Hands-free is the only way to go for dealing with game in the dark…or hiking out solo in the dark in bear country…

      wahoo wrote: Smith mine is grn – When I have a minute I will shoot you a photo- hell if you come to Salmon town you can see it yourself – stay at the house and you can buy me a soda pop.

      Deal. 😉

    • James HarveyJames Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Mike, that looks like a great little light. I’ve been using Petzl’s for a while and rate them highly. Simple and robust 😉

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      Another vote for Fenix I have the E15 on my key ring, also like my Petzl head torch.

      Speaking of mirrors and doing double duty I have a small magnifying lens for getting thorns out it will light a fire on a good day.

      Back to Bison gear can you attach pouches, sheaths and water bottles as you would with a webbing or drop belt.

      Mark.

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