Home Forums Bows and Equipment binoculars vs spotting scope

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    • velozero
      Post count: 2

      I am new in hunting and wondering,because I don’t have the

      money to buy all, what the best purchase is for me to start

      with. A binocular or spotting scope.I think a 10×42 binocular is the best option.Any help is welcome,thanks.

    • Hubertus
      Post count: 99

      For what my limited experience is worth, go with the binoulars. You’ll need something that goes with you and can be brought to your eye at a moment’s notice. Keep them around your neck at all times.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      Yes,as Hubertus said, get the Binoculars first [ the best you can afford]as they help you find the object that the Spotting Scope enlarges/enhances. You will use the binoculars way more than a Spotting Scope. I carry 9/10x mostly, but I have used Binos all my life and I hunt in the West – where more power is helpful imho.

      Scout.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2749

      Another vote for binos … but what size? I own some large Zeiss-Jenna 8x that have excellent low-light vision, but rarely carry them hunting because they’re so big and heavy. I have a great 15-45x Bausch & Lomb scope and never carry it, even when hunting pronghorn. Not to say there aren’t uses for these powerful optics — my wife and I use them a lot for watching wildlife from a distance. And all the trophy hunters we see in videos like them for hero props :P. But for me, the only optics I feel are essential to trad bowhunting are high-quality shirt-pocket minis. While you can get these in higher magnification, they tend to be shakey visually, and have poor low-light vision. I love my Zeiss 6x minis and almost never wish I had more with me. Lots of choices, but whatever you decide on get the best you can afford to save eye strain. I’ve always bought the cheapest of most everything, of necessity. But not optics.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      velozero –

      If you decide to stay with the 10x42s or any other larger bino than the mini’s [as Dave mentioned, which are Very convenient!]. I find a chest harness {to carry them-} for me works very well. Allows fairly easy access for glassing, and are out of the way when one needs to shoot. Most of the big outfits sell them –Leupold/swarovski etc.

      Scout

    • Jason Wesbrock
      Member
      Post count: 762

      I agree with Cyberscout about using a binocular harness. I have a set of Alpen 10×42 roof prisms with a harness that I use for hunting anything from pigs in TX to elk in CO, whitetails at home, and moose in Ontario. I also use them for 3D shoots and field archery. They’re not the best optics around, but they get the job done.

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 413

      I’m a spot and stalker so I went with the 8 x 30 and wear them on my chest. I think it depends on how you plan on using and what your hunting. I use my binos everyday just looking out my windows or walking behind my house. I don’t own a spotting scope but use one now mostly looking at elk with or without horns (friends).

    • Troy Warner
      Post count: 239

      I hunt the flatlands of South Dakota for white tail and SW Colorado for elk. I have a 10×42 and an 8×40 I use the 10x for the search from a higher vantage point in SD to locate an animal either in a shelter belt or fenceline, then switch to the 8x’s for stalking. If I still hunt the shelter belts I use the 8x’s. For elk hunting I use the 8x’s exclusively. Since your just starting out I, like the others above, recommend the 8×30, 8×40. Your eyes will thank you after looking through them every 10-15 minutes stalking or looking through them for 10 minutes strait trying to pick the best route to do a stalk.

      Good luck,

      Troy

    • FallguyFallguy
      Member
      Post count: 317

      Bino’s for sure. Magnification? That depends on what and where you are hunting. Whitetails in thick cover low power 6 or 7. Antelope or sheep 8 or 10 power. I do not like compacts as they tend to have a smaller field of view and less light gathering ability. The ones I carry for most everything are Bausch & Lomb 7 X 42 Discoverer’s. You can’t get them any more they are a little on the heavy side. I use the bino strap that Barry Wensel sells and love it. As with all things in life no one thing is perfect for everything.

    • velozero
      Post count: 2

      Thanks guys for the advice,it’s very helpful.I ordered a Bushnell Legend Ultra-HD 10×42 that comes with a harness that will work for now to spot and stalk. I live next to the Grand Tetons in Wyoming and I can also use it for backpacking.Thanks again for the help.

    • Raymond CoffmanRaymond Coffman
      Moderator
      Post count: 1035

      velozero

      Good Choice, I have not personally used that model but they are supposed to be very nice -and fairly light for 10x42s.

      Give us a report after you have used them awhile.

      Scout

    • JL
      Post count: 27

      [quote=velozero]I am new in hunting and wondering,because I don’t have the

      money to buy all, what the best purchase is for me to start

      with. A binocular or spotting scope.I think a 10×42 binocular is the best option.Any help is welcome,thanks.[/quote

      I have had the same question and the replies to your post have been very helpful. I’m in the west and have carried 8×25 for several years. They are handy but do not do the job. I am going to stay with binoculars, but move up into the 10x(?) range. Every time I think of using a spotting scope with tripod I get back to just not wanting to carry that much stuff. Great post and replies, thanks.

    • wildschwein
      Post count: 581

      I am going to put forward a third choice, a monocular. If you go to http://www.vortexoptics.com you will see what I am talking about. I purchased one of their Solo models at 8x magnification. They are extremely lightwieght, perform well for the price (under $100), and will fit in your breast pocket while being worn around your neck. No need for a harness and it is very easy to access without making a great deal of movement. Definately the way to go if you prefer to hunt mostly out of treestands or still hunt.

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