Home Forums Campfire Forum Archery References in Language

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    • paleoman
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      Post count: 918

      A reply in another post mentioned ” going of half cocked”, an historical reference to early firearms failures as most know. Of course the English language is loaded with firearm references (is lexicon the correct term here?). Must be tons of archery related connections to modernity? ” Straight as an arrow” is a cliche now…what else can you think of?

    • paleoman
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 918

      BTW…try not to use your “Googler”:D I can think of tons for guns…fewer come to mind for archery as quickly.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      Paleo, I’ve heard that the phrase “Rule of thumb” originates from the old brace height standard of sticking the base of your fist on the handle of the bow and sticking your thumb out. But that is a completely unconfirmed internet rumor that I can’t support with any reliable evidence ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • David Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2270

      I like this thread. I can’t think of a thing and it’s making me upset. I’m trying not to come unstrung. dwc

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      I believe the origin of the use of “the finger” had to do with a sign to the French that the English still had that finger to use. I’m thinking I read that the French would remove the middle finger of an enemy archer so his use of the bow would not be efficient. Maybe not the true meaning either though as some things do continue on thru time.:lol::lol:

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 759

      I believe the term ‘parting shot’ is from Mongol horsemen that would lean over the back of a horse to shoot as they rode away.

      ‘out of the blue’ from arrows dropping vertically onto lucky recipients that could not see them falling.

      ‘keep it under your hat’ an expression for keeping something secret but originally for keeping bowstrings dry.

      I know I have a book at home with lots of these references but in line with the spirit of the thread will resist looking them up.

      Mark.

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      After living in the Texas Panhandle since ancient times:wink:, I believe the expression “stinking wind” (putting it in a kindly form) originated here in reference to the actual impact of the arrow in relation to its original intent. ๐Ÿ˜€

      I am also resisting temptation to go prowling for info. Obviously!

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1130

      R2 wrote: I am also resisting temptation to go prowling for info. Obviously!

      ๐Ÿ˜€

    • paleoman
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 918

      Slap on the wrist?? It’ s the forearm though whenever I’ve be been slapped…this is harder than I thought:?

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      When we “Robin Hood” an arrow!!!

    • David Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2270

      Or Robin Hood a dart. dwc

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      “Twang”? Probably a bowstring before a guitar string! Then there’s the “thunk” of an arrow upon impact but then again that might have derived from Wilma’s landing a club upside Fred’s head :lol::lol:

    • Bender
      Post count: 57

      The term “point blank range” is actually archery related and predates firearms.

      Comes from Medieval archery tournaments. It was considered legit to place things out on the ground to provide an aiming references. Often a scrap of white cloth was staked down. The term comes from French, “pointe blanc” and of course refers to the white scrap that was used as an aiming point.

    • Alexandre Bugnon
      Member
      Post count: 681

      My new, upcoming record is called

      ” moment of truth” ๐Ÿ˜€

    • Ralph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2554

      Now I been deep thinking :lol::lol:, “He’s as straight as an arrow”. OK, I’m thru with deep, back to normal shallow. ๐Ÿ˜€ Ur welcome.

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      “Add another string to your bow” often said here if you’re learning/learned a new skill.

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