Home Forums Campfire Forum Anyone eat coyote?

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    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      I arrowed my first and possibly last coyote 3 weeks ago. Im tanning the pelt and have the quartered carcass in my freezer(used it to teach a class on game processing). My plan was to put the carcass out with a game cam on it. But now…. I’ve been wondering.

      Ive eaten everything I’ve hunted before and this just feels weird to me to use him for photo op bait.

      I figure I’ll grill up a backstrap and braise some shoulder.

      Am I crazy?

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      Giggle — I personally applaud your ill feelings in this arena. While lots of ethical bowhunters love to hunt predators and esp. coyotes, including several regulars on this site, I feel as you do re “If I won’t eat it, I won’t shoot it.” Many years ago I gave an ethics talk on precisely that theme to a couple hundred hunters from all over Canada. After the talk one gentleman came up to me and said he both trapped and hunted coyotes, and ate every one of them and “coyote eats good.” I didn’t doubt him for a moment, but then lots of Canadians love jackrabbit too, which I’ve tried and found suitable only for last-ditch survival food. So just a regionalism can have a ton to do with ethics, so too it apparently has to do with what eats good and what doesn’t. Let us know what you think of it, and perhaps more important, what you wife and kids think of it, assuming you have such live-in food critics. πŸ˜›

    • Brennan Herr
      Member
      Post count: 403

      Go for it….just let us know how it goes.

    • wahoo
      Member
      Post count: 404

      I’m like DP. Never ate yotes but ate Jacks I didn’t think they were that bad ??

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      I just pulled it out of the freezer. It’s just a frozen block of meat right now. I pulled off a ham shank and its thawing in a ziplock bag in the sink.

      I’m figuring a braise will be the way to go. My girlfriend thinks I’m crazy and my dog is giving me a wide berth.

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      People have made it for our wild game supper at the University of GA a few times but I can’t remember how it turned out.

      If I were you, I’d do a fail safe recipe like bbq in a crock pot or smoker. I’d probably also soak it in salted ice water for a few days beforehand.

      Good luck! Can’t wait to hear about it!

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      In the hard times of winter among the American Indians from what I’ve read it was not a good idea to be a dog. I can’t see why there would be any difference other than for in modern times our dogs probably have more meat on their bones plus a “little” more fat than either coyotes or Native American dog types. And I’m sorry but if I trap and kill a mouse or a rat I ain’t eatin’ it. Go for it if you want. Skunks either.

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      While I was at the gym my girlfriend threw out the braising coyote. When I got home the house smelled bad. Like sour game. I’m allowed to give it one more shot but I have to cook it outside.

      We’ve got 8 or 9 incense sticks burning right now.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1119

      Haha, live and learn πŸ™‚

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Me no eat dog of any type….:shock:

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Hey, Monk- Welcome back. Been awhile. Nice shootin’! Don’t underestimate the power of sausage. They’ll never see it coming. πŸ˜‰

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      Wonder if it tastes like chicken?

    • Col MikeCol Mike
      Member
      Post count: 910

      Just returned from the dog yard where I asked the ?– 18 husky’s looked at me and growled–eat what? They then said “ask monk to come visit”–:shock: I then got a lecture on cannibalism and how society frowns on the practice.

      Semper Fi

      Mike

    • tombow
      Post count: 103

      I would have to ask the same question about wolves. MN and WI just finished their 1st season of wolf hunting and I just have to wonder about the meat if it was eaten or disposed of in some other way. I would have to guess that the coyote diet, as with all animals, would effect the taste of coyote meat. I firmly believe that coyotes do scavenge all kinds of stuff that other animals would stay well away from. In a heavily populated (coyote) area I see gut piles reduced over night to a little green puddle and nothing else, which tells me they are eating everything and anything. Perhaps this explains the “sour meat” smell resulting from your cooking test. But then again, some people eat cheese that smells like heavily used gym shoes sealed in mason jars with a little water, that were buried in warm sand for weeks. Not my cup, but far be it from me to say that it isn’t food to someone. Who knows? Maybe coyote has great immune system building powers for humans, based on all the stuff they eat which would kill lesser animals.

      Best of luck. I think I will stick with venison and leave the dog-like critters alone. That’s my cent and a half on the subject. NNNNNext.

    • tombow
      Post count: 103

      OK, another quarter-cent…

      Just did a search on T-Gang and came up with no real recipes, a few “cook it with a boot, throw yote away, eat boot” recipes, but no actual real recipes where the writer was serious about eating it. The meat apparently is stringy and “nothing smells worse than a skinned coyote”. I’m guessing that any recipe that would turn out edible would involve making the actual taste of the coyote meat disappear, ie: spice the ca-rap out of it and how ya don’t taste no yote!

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      I’ve skinned a bunch of yotes and even a few bobbycats. It’s a close race as to which smells the worse.:?

      Living in the south and travelling around with afew fellows from LA often had me wondering what we were eatting.:shock:

      I know for fact anything crossing the roads was far game for the next meal.:D

      Troy

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      I don’t want to turn this into a religious debate, but the Old Testament does give pretty good specifics as to what we should and shouldn’t eat. Now, that said, I understand that the New Testament, somewhere….says that all things are clean, or at least, I have been told that that’s what it says. However, the stuff listed in the Old Testament as “clean” makes more sense to eat than the stuff that’s “unclean”. Myself, I’m not gonna eat a coyote, skunk, weasel, or a number of other animals that are known scavengers. I’m sure the coyote must have a very strong immune system, but perhaps their immune system simply coexists with certain bacteria and diseases that are harmful to humans? I don’t know. I’m beginning to ramble now. Let us know how it tastes. And how many gallons of BBQ sauce you need to kill the coyote taste. LOL!

    • Wexbow
      Post count: 403

      Michael Scott wrote: Now, that said, I understand that the New Testament, somewhere….says that all things are clean, or at least, I have been told that that’s what it says.

      Michael it goes like this – Matthew 15:11 It is not what goes into the mouth that defiles a person, but what comes out of the mouth; this defiles a person.

      Some pretty sound advice no matter what persuasion you are I reckon. So go for the yote, but I think I’ll pass, as anything that is reported to smell that bad when skinned just doesn’t tickle my taste buds 😯

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      Wexbow wrote: Michael it goes like this – Matthew 15:11 It is not what goes into the mouth that defiles a person, but what comes out of the mouth; this defiles a person.

      Wexbow,

      While that is definitely a good passage to keep in mind, that’s not the one I was thinking of. The one I was thinking of is something about a white sheet, and a bunch of unclean foods laid out on it, I think. It has been a long time since I read the passage, so I don’t remember it clearly.

      But like you said, if it smells that bad during skinning…I ain’t eating it. And predators do stink…

    • Goraidh
      Post count: 101

      I shot a crow 20 or 25 years ago and figured I’d give it a going over in the frypan. But, when it came to dinnertime, I just couldn’t do it. Threw it outside for the wild critters have. Felt bad about killing something that I didn’t eat, ya know?

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      All meat is edible if cooked to the right temps. Just saw Scott Leysath “the sporting chef” go on a crow hunt and eat crow cooked in several different ways. He said it wasn’t great but was somewhat similar to duck and not too bad.

      Out in Idaho, my buddy at the backstraps of the lion he killed and loved em. The guide took the hams to a wild game supper and everybody loved them.

      I’ve skinned some ridiculously smelly bears and they all tasted delicious. You never know until you try it.

      Heck, ever skinned a wild pig? Just awful smelling, ugly mothers, but some awesome meat on the table!

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      Alas, there is more to determining what we like and don’t like to eat than how it tastes to the tongue … it also matters, to some, how it tastes (dare I say it?) to the heart. This is why I don’t hunt bear. I’ve eaten it and don’t care for the grainy texture but love the taste; I’d eat it any time I was hungry and knew it was killed in fair chase. It’s something else that keeps me from hunting them. Lot’s of ways to skin a cat … and that leaves me wondering if anyone has ever tried feral housecat? With apologies to Robin, I hear they are delicious and recommend that we all go out and whack and stack every free-roaming murderous fat cat we can find. 😈

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      David Petersen wrote: Alas, there is more to determining what we like and don’t like to eat than how it tastes to the tongue … it also matters, to some, how it tastes (dare I say it?) to the heart. This is why I don’t hunt bear. I’ve eaten it and don’t care for the grainy texture but love the taste; I’d eat it any time I was hungry and knew it was killed in fair chase. It’s something else that keeps me from hunting them. Lot’s of ways to skin a cat … and that leaves me wondering if anyone has ever tried feral housecat? With apologies to Robin, I hear they are delicious and recommend that we all go out and whack and stack every free-roaming murderous fat cat we can find. 😈

      I’ve been to a lot of chinese buffets. I imagine I have.

      Only ever shot one. I’d like to kill all the country cats I see living outside, but I don’t have the heart for it. If people only knew how much senseless killing they did, maybe they’d keep them inside or not at all.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      True story: A few years ago here, a Chinese restaurant went out of business after it was busted by the health department for raising cats in the restaurant basement. These folks were right off the boat, couldn’t speak English, were arrogant toward their customers, so anything was possible, or even likely.

      On this topic I’ve not said enough, yet I’ve already said too much. 😯 As it happens we’re having purple hull (blackeyed pea) soup for dinner and the only meat is a bit of bacon. Elk supply is already running low and that’s the last time I’ll shoot a yearling cow … delicious but just not much there.

    • sinawalli
      Post count: 222

      David Petersen wrote: True story: A few years ago here, a Chinese restaurant went out of business after it was busted by the health department for raising cats in the restaurant basement. These folks were right off the boat, couldn’t speak English, were arrogant toward their customers, so anything was possible, or even likely.

      On this topic I’ve not said enough, yet I’ve already said too much. 😯 As it happens we’re having purple hull (blackeyed pea) soup for dinner and the only meat is a bit of bacon. Elk supply is already running low and that’s the last time I’ll shoot a yearling cow … delicious but just not much there.

      Pretty much the same story here, except they had yote carcasses hanging in the freezer! I tried cougar once, and it was excellent, very similar to pork!

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      David Petersen wrote: True story: A few years ago here, a Chinese restaurant went out of business after it was busted by the health department for raising cats in the restaurant basement. These folks were right off the boat, couldn’t speak English, were arrogant toward their customers, so anything was possible, or even likely.

      On this topic I’ve not said enough, yet I’ve already said too much. 😯 As it happens we’re having purple hull (blackeyed pea) soup for dinner and the only meat is a bit of bacon. Elk supply is already running low and that’s the last time I’ll shoot a yearling cow … delicious but just not much there.

      Dave, Know exactly what you mean. Several years ago while in FL we ate at a Chinese place. When we pulled up, the place was crowded and had to park in the back.

      When we got out of the truck there was a fellow with a pan of scraps calling “kitty, kitty”. Cats were coming out of the woodworks to the free meal.

      After we finished, we walked back to the truck. Again that fellow was out there calling “kitty, kitty”. Only problem was there wasn’t a cat in sight.

      I still wonder why that sweet and sour chicken was so stringy. Maybe not…..

      Troy

    • Goraidh
      Post count: 101

      When I was a Navy sailor in the Phillipines, I knowingly ate dog (sorry, dog-lovers). It’s wan’t very good, and never had it again. Also had monkey. But I did eat that over and again as it makes an amazing BBQ.

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Never eaten one.. I’d try it.. I guess…:D

      I’ve only shot 2 coyotes. One was while deer hunting, and I called in my first yote predator hunting this past December.

      I didn’t eat either one..

      I’d rather eat mountain lion than a yote… I can’t explain it, but a cat sounds more appealing than a canine.. Maybe because they’re “cleaner” animals… That’s all I can conjure up in my meager mind at the moment.

      Wouldn’t mind eating bear, because they’re a omnivore. Even though the coyotes around here will eat persimmons and fruit just as much as fresh meat or rotten carrion…

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      I cooked up a blackstrap this morning. It’s my 35th bday and the girlfriend let me cook it inside with some duck eggs. It wasn’t horrible, cooked med rare in bear fat with salt pepper and a fig spread, but I couldn’t finish it. Stringy and sour.

      I’ve had mountain lion, didn’t like it, bobcat, didn’t like it, dog in Tibet, didn’t know it, bear, sometimes like it, and all sorts of stuff in Africa. Maybe I just don’t like carnivores. Could be the relationship aspect to the animal though. I hold coyotes in a high esteem, pretty resilient and intelligent creatures. So maybe that’s a part of it.

      I didn’t get a deer last season and I ate all the freebies that my buddies gave me.

      Anyways, no more coyote hunting for me

    • Alexandre Bugnon
      Member
      Post count: 681

      I missed one this season by one inch!. He jumped the string and made a 180 faster than a deer. Had I killed it, I would have skinned it right at the spot he fell, and let the other critters of the woods feast on the meat. No way I’m eating coyote unless I was faced with death by starvation. πŸ˜€

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      Giggle — Happy Birthday! 35 is good and there’s no reason to get any older (other than to stay alive). I’m not surprised you didn’t like that coyote blackstrap. πŸ˜› Dave

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      I hate to bring this up after the fact, but you shouldn’t eat any carnivorous animal “med rare” or anything less than well done.

      Trichinosis is bad in bears, lions, pigs, and everything else that eats meat.

      Better be safe than sorry. Put some scotch down your gullet to kill all those wiggly critters.

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Etter1 wrote: I hate to bring this up after the fact, but you shouldn’t eat any carnivorous animal “med rare” or anything less than well done.

      Trichinosis is bad in bears, lions, pigs, and everything else that eats meat.

      Better be safe than sorry. Put some scotch down your gullet to kill all those wiggly critters.

      Think I’d opt for some “Golden Grain”..:lol:

    • mhay
      Post count: 264

      Yeah ,,,,,It would have to be a long time since the last meal to sit down to a ‘yote. I undressed one in ’96 and there ain’t much there to cook .

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      I applaud you on giving it a shot!

    • Lawrence Hansen
      Member
      Post count: 16

      Giggle,

      Everyone,

      There was an article in TBM on the less than desireable outcome of eating ‘coon’. A subsequent issue had a letter suggesting the solution for tough/stringy meat was to parboil before grilling, baking etc. Was one of the old days and old ways of (subsistence?) Living.

      F.Y.I.

      Larry

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      Rabbit and squirrel are super tough (to me) if you don’t boil them for an hour or so first. Usually I boil them until fork tender and then flour and fry.

      Might work for a song dog too.

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      Giggle, I commend you for giving it an honest shot. That’s more than I will do for Wily Coyote. I’ve had bear, never had cat. Mostly 4 legged, split-hooved critters. Also, Happy Birthday!! Hope it was good.

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Gigglemonk wrote: It’s my 35th bday…

      Huh. Looks like you made your 100th post on Tradbow on your 35th bday.

      Happy birthday.

      I celebrated my 32nd a few weeks ago with a 14 mile solo run on a Nat’l Prairie Preserve near here. Chilly & invigorating!

      -Ben

    • Bruce Smithhammer
      Post count: 2514

      Gigglemonk wrote: It’s my 35th bday

      Yeah!! Have a great one!

      Etter1 wrote:

      Better be safe than sorry. Put some [strikethrough]scotch[/strikethrough] bourbon down your gullet to kill all those wiggly critters.

      A policy I try to stick to with anything worth eaing. πŸ˜†

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Hahaha!!

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Etter1 wrote: Rabbit and squirrel are super tough (to me) if you don’t boil them for an hour or so first. Usually I boil them until fork tender and then flour and fry.

      Might work for a song dog too.

      I can skin a rabbit, throw it all on the grill, sprinkle some salt, pepper, and then eat the entire thing in no time!!! My favorite small game!!!!

      But… Fried rabbit is my favorite!!! I don’t boil rabbit, but I do boil squirrels.

      I’m sorry, but I’m not eating a coyote. I’ve thought it over a for a couple of days and came to the conclusion not long ago!!:lol: You fellas can have at it, I’ll pass! LOL!

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      Happy Birthday, late, of course, to both of you. Mine will be here before I know it, too. June…32 as well. Wow…trying to figure out where the other ones went to….oh well, they’re gone.

    • gigglemonk
      Post count: 146

      Thanks for the birthday wishes! Even though the coyote meal was a fail it turned out to be a good effort. My buddy came over for a bday bbq and gave me a whole backstrap off an elk he shot last season. best gift of the year!

      And thanks for the heads up on cooking carnivores medium rare. I learned my lesson, was burping up coyote howls all day.

      Thanks a lot all

    • ccrconner
      Post count: 10

      Well, a lot of folks eat possum! And before we get real picky about eating carnivores, think about chicken!

      πŸ˜€

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Michael Scott wrote: Happy Birthday, late, of course, to both of you. Mine will be here before I know it, too. June…32 as well. Wow…trying to figure out where the other ones went to….oh well, they’re gone.

      It was probably all the bourbon.

      Gigglemonk wrote: My buddy came over for a bday bbq and gave me a whole backstrap off an elk he shot last season. best gift of the year!

      Dang, man! Now that’s the kind of friends you want to have!

    • JodyS
      Post count: 114

      Michael and Wexbow,

      The passage you are looking for is Acts 10:9-14.

      Anyone like catfish? Fried catfish is a Southern staple, but old mister-whisker fish will eat anything, dead or alive…anything.

      I will stick to venison, elk, turkey, crappie, and walleye.

    • David Petersen
      Member
      Post count: 2762

      No, I’ve never eaten coyote … but I’ve eaten an awful lot of crow!

      attached file
    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Still can’t get over the thoughts of eatting yote.:roll:

      However, another great meal that comes from something that will eat anything is Gator.:shock:

      If people saw what one of those critters will dine on they would never touch it. I’ve have my fair share of it and brother let me tell ya, it’s great!!!:D

      Troy

    • David CoulterDavid Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2231

      A tangent on this thread, but what about carp? I don’t bowfish, but lots of guys do and carp seems to be the main game. Nobody I know eats carp. The ones I’ve caught on a line were either let go or put in as fertilizer. dwc

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Dude, do it! That’s another meat that I just don’t understand why people throw away. Pressure cook it for 1.5hours with the bones in & it comes out like canned salmon (with yummy nutritious crunchy little bones). Or, if you’ve got a lot of it, can it (which also requires pressure cooking). Can it in pints and use it like you would canned salmon. Make patties out of it with egg, crumbled crackers, rosemary, salt & pepper, garlic powder, and minced onions & black olives. Pan fry in olive oil.

      I’m blown away every time I hear people talking about carp as “coon bait”. This is really good food!

      There’s another one that I just can’t believe people throw out: Wild turkey legs & thighs. Pressure cooked, it’s so tender they’ll fight over it.

    • Mark Turton
      Post count: 761

      David, a local guy that catches carp puts them live in a tank of clean water for a few days to get the mud out of them and says they then eat well, never tried it myself, very popular in eastern europe.

      Dave, crows ok but go for the young ones when they begin to sit out on the branches, very tender.

      Mike, husky, the original trail food or so I read, its not on my list.

      I had snake in Korea and enjoyed that, thought it was eel at first. Turned down coypu in France didn’t smell good.

      Mark.

    • Troy Warner
      Post count: 239

      I had a burger over seas while in the Navy, it tatsed a little off but not to bad, I asked about the flavor and was informed, after the fact, that it was dog burger mixed with pig fat. 😯

      As much as I dislike pork chops I’m inclined to believe it was the pig that made the flavor taste off center, but I wasn’t inclined to try another one to test my theroy. πŸ˜‰

      Troy

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      Prairie Prowler wrote: Dude, do it! That’s another meat that I just don’t understand why people throw away. Pressure cook it for 1.5hours with the bones in & it comes out like canned salmon (with yummy nutritious crunchy little bones). Or, if you’ve got a lot of it, can it (which also requires pressure cooking). Can it in pints and use it like you would canned salmon. Make patties out of it with egg, crumbled crackers, rosemary, salt & pepper, garlic powder, and minced onions & black olives. Pan fry in olive oil.

      I’m blown away every time I hear people talking about carp as “coon bait”. This is really good food!

      There’s another one that I just can’t believe people throw out: Wild turkey legs & thighs. Pressure cooked, it’s so tender they’ll fight over it.

      People that throw out turkey legs shouldn’t be killing them.

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Etter1 wrote: [quote=Prairie Prowler]Dude, do it! That’s another meat that I just don’t understand why people throw away. Pressure cook it for 1.5hours with the bones in & it comes out like canned salmon (with yummy nutritious crunchy little bones). Or, if you’ve got a lot of it, can it (which also requires pressure cooking). Can it in pints and use it like you would canned salmon. Make patties out of it with egg, crumbled crackers, rosemary, salt & pepper, garlic powder, and minced onions & black olives. Pan fry in olive oil.

      I’m blown away every time I hear people talking about carp as “coon bait”. This is really good food!

      There’s another one that I just can’t believe people throw out: Wild turkey legs & thighs. Pressure cooked, it’s so tender they’ll fight over it.

      People that throw out turkey legs shouldn’t be killing them.

      I agree 100%. Those legs, thighs and wings eat as good as any other part of the bird.

      Troy

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      David Petersen wrote: True story: A few years ago here, a Chinese restaurant went out of business after it was busted by the health department for raising cats in the restaurant basement.

      Found a gem. Couldn’t help but share.

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      Prairie Prowler wrote: [quote=David Petersen]True story: A few years ago here, a Chinese restaurant went out of business after it was busted by the health department for raising cats in the restaurant basement.

      Found a gem. Couldn’t help but share.

      Now that’s funny!!!!:D:D

      Troy

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Troy Breeding wrote: Still can’t get over the thoughts of eatting yote.:roll:

      However, another great meal that comes from something that will eat anything is Gator.:shock:

      If people saw what one of those critters will dine on they would never touch it. I’ve have my fair share of it and brother let me tell ya, it’s great!!!:D

      Troy

      Fried gator tail is simply divine!!!!

      Fried frog legs are right there with gator tail!

      Etter, Broadhead, and myself ate a long nose gar a couple of years ago and I have to say…..the back straps on a gar, grilled over some charcoal, basted with melted butter, is pretty darn close to lobster. I was skeptical of Etter’s insistence to eat that prehistoric beast, but I caved and tried it out. Not bad at all!!!! Cleaning one is an adventure too! πŸ˜†

      And the fried squirrel I ate last night was delicious as well!!

      Sorry….. I’m from the south and I like to fry critters!!:lol:

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      We substitute the chicken in chicken and rice casserole with squirrel or rabbit or pheasant, quail, or whatever. The slow cooking with the other ingredients, rice, cream of mushroom, sometimes cream of chicken soup (plus my wife’s touch of something) make’em tender and ummmmm yum.

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1119

      My favourite chinese restaurant was shut down by health inspectors, not for meat substitutes but because the inspectors found (along with several more mundane breaches) a dead rat painted into the wall in the kitchen! I love the idea that some guy had his paint roller working over the wall and saw a dead rat in the corner and he just shrugged his shoulders and said “eh” and painted over it πŸ˜†

      When it reopened I kept going there. They made good food πŸ™‚

      As a kid running around the hills I used eat lots termites and widgety grubs. Neither of them taste like much but it made a little boy feel like he was a wild man surviving off the land πŸ˜›

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      BuckyT wrote: [quote=Troy Breeding]Still can’t get over the thoughts of eatting yote.:roll:

      However, another great meal that comes from something that will eat anything is Gator.:shock:

      If people saw what one of those critters will dine on they would never touch it. I’ve have my fair share of it and brother let me tell ya, it’s great!!!:D

      Troy

      Fried gator tail is simply divine!!!!

      Fried frog legs are right there with gator tail!

      Etter, Broadhead, and myself ate a long nose gar a couple of years ago and I have to say…..the back straps on a gar, grilled over some charcoal, basted with melted butter, is pretty darn close to lobster. I was skeptical of Etter’s insistence to eat that prehistoric beast, but I caved and tried it out. Not bad at all!!!! Cleaning one is an adventure too! πŸ˜†

      And the fried squirrel I ate last night was delicious as well!!

      Sorry….. I’m from the south and I like to fry critters!!:lol:

      Only southerners know how to cook.:D

      Troy

    • Michael Scott
      Post count: 80

      JodyS wrote: Michael and Wexbow,

      The passage you are looking for is Acts 10:9-14.

      Anyone like catfish? Fried catfish is a Southern staple, but old mister-whisker fish will eat anything, dead or alive…anything.

      I will stick to venison, elk, turkey, crappie, and walleye.

      Yes, Jody S, that is the passage I was referring to. I still have no clue what it means, and haven’t looked into it far enough yet to make my decision on certain foods. What are your thoughts on it? You can pm me if you don’t want to take up forum space…lol…but I’m with you on the venison, elk, turkey and such…

      dwcphoto wrote: A tangent on this thread, but what about carp? I don’t bowfish, but lots of guys do and carp seems to be the main game. Nobody I know eats carp. The ones I’ve caught on a line were either let go or put in as fertilizer. dwc

      Back home, in Montana, we have a species of carp known locally as the squawfish, technically known as the Northern Pikeminnow. It is part of the carp family, but is a huge competitor of the native (and non-native) trout species, in that it will eat almost any food source that other fish will eat. I lived on a lake for a couple years that had a good population of these fish, and my wife and I decided to bake one that was about 18-20″ long, once. The meat was a nice flaky white meat like a bass or perch would have, except that each fillet contained an upper and lower set of “Y-bones” at the rear of the fillet behind the ribs that took FOREVER to pick through and extract. Aside from that, it was very palatable and not overly fishy like trout can be. I liked it, myself. Just wished for fewer bones.

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      ausjim wrote: I love the idea that some guy had his paint roller working over the wall and saw a dead rat in the corner and he just shrugged his shoulders and said “eh” and painted over it πŸ˜†

      Australians. You guys are funny! πŸ˜†

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      After seeing this bowfishing catch, coyote be fine with me.

      Can’t imagine that thing in the same water as me???

    • James Harvey
      Member
      Post count: 1119

      😯

    • Troy Breeding
      Post count: 994

      I’m with ausjim,,,:shock::shock:

    • Ben M.
      Post count: 460

      Sorry, R2, I just can’t believe that is a real, living thing. I’m calling “photoshop” on it. Can you give us some more information? (Man, have we drifted from coyotes or what?)

    • RalphRalph
      Moderator
      Post count: 2515

      “As it turns out, the cast of β€˜Jersey Shore’ may not be the most frightening thing you can find in New Jersey.

      In what is surely the first fish tale to live up to the hype since β€˜Moby Dick,’ some lucky soul named Doug Cutler managed to catch the creature in the above photo with a bow and arrow while in the waters of the Garden State. It’s called a sea lamprey and, yes, it’s as tough as its horror movie-looking-like mug makes it appear.

      The sea lamprey, which usually grows to about three feet long, is a parasite that ravages all kinds of fish through a β€œbloodsucking orifice,” making it the second breed of species to do that, along with ex-wife. This particular sea lamprey is now terrorizing Reddit, where it has generated 1.2 million views. Apparently, this type of parasite has recently been spotted frequently in New Jersey because old dams have been destroyed due to safety concerns”. This is the article I saw, real or not.

      This is what I know about it. Long ways from coyote yep but subject was also going towards eating what you kill.

    • Etter1
      Post count: 831

      I’m sure lamprey tastes fine. I’ve caught several ramoras while deep sea fishing. Didn’t try one, but they looked tasty enough.

      Eel is delicious. Never had it at a sushi bar? It’s my favorite thing aside from tuna.

    • BuckyT
      Post count: 138

      Etter1 wrote: I’m sure lamprey tastes fine. I’ve caught several ramoras while deep sea fishing. Didn’t try one, but they looked tasty enough.

      Eel is delicious. Never had it at a sushi bar? It’s my favorite thing aside from tuna.

      I wouldn’t eat a lamprey if I was starving…….. I’d rather die…….

      πŸ˜†

    • Forresterwoods
      Member
      Post count: 104

      Gigglemonk wrote: I arrowed my first and possibly last coyote 3 weeks ago. Im tanning the pelt and have the quartered carcass in my freezer(used it to teach a class on game processing). My plan was to put the carcass out with a game cam on it. But now…. I’ve been wondering.

      Ive eaten everything I’ve hunted before and this just feels weird to me to use him for photo op bait.

      I figure I’ll grill up a backstrap and braise some shoulder.

      Am I crazy?

      It’s kind of like hamster…

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