Home Forums Bows and Equipment Aluminum vs. Carbon with feathers

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    • Ricardo Gonzalez
      Member
      Post count: 19

      I’m a new in recurve shooting, what arrows recommend to use in my Ben Pearson Hunter amo 58″,45-28″.

    • David Coulter
      Member
      Post count: 2270

      Get ready for some opinions on this one. Any arrow that you can tune and shoot straight might be the right answer. I started with wood, went to aluminum, then moved on to carbon. The reason I went with carbon was for durability. I was busting and bending too many shafts, mostly when stumping. I’ve built a good arrow that gives me high FOC and is very durable. That my reason why for my vote for carbon. I’ve read here that hardwood shafts are also very tough and shoot really well. I think aluminum is really accurate and easy to tune. I just kept destroying them.

      Welcome to the trail! Dwc

    • Thomas Green
      Post count: 2

      I also am relatively new to shooting with a trad bow (1 year now). Based on my “learning experiences” I suggest you start off with the least expensive arrows that you can find until you settle on which spine and length of arrow fit your bow and give yourself time to develop your form. Once you become a relatively competent shooter (by your own standards)than try more expensive arrows. For me,in the beginning, I ruined quite a few arrows: fletchings ripped off, shafts bent, field points blunted and nocks went flying. Glad I started with aluminum.

      It is all a great learning experience. I am new to this forum, from what I read folks seem helpful. Another good source is the “experts” at 3 Rivers Archery, they are always helpful in answering my questions, you may want to take advantage of their services. Enjoy your new found endeavor.

    • Stephen Graf
      Moderator
      Post count: 2371

      There is no “right” answer. The only thing that is important in the end is that you have fun watching your arrows hit the target.

      I agree with the sentiment to spend as little as possible on arrows. They don’t fly any better when they cost more.

      The easiest arrows to work with are probably aluminum. The most durable arrows to work with are probably carbon. The most fun arrows to work with are wood (IMO).

      The important thing is to get an arrow that flies right for you. That takes experimentation. You can get a test pack of arrows from 3Rivers that include arrows of several different spines. Then you can play around and find what works.

      Nobody can do this for you. Ain’t it great?

      Carbon arrows and Aluminum Arrows can be tuned the same way. See the tutorials in the “Friends of FOC” forum.

      Wood arrows are their own thing. I would suggest you cut the arrow off 1″ longer than your draw length. After you taper the shaft and put your point on, the back of your point will be about 1/4″ from your bow. This is as long as you want to go with wood. Then vary the point to get good flight. Bare shaft tuning doesn’t work with wood.

    • Ricardo Gonzalez
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 19

      Any info gathering for you guys is very useful for my,I’m a beginner in shooting recurve, i want to learning with your experience Thank you.

    • Ricardo Gonzalez
      Member
      Member
      Post count: 19

      Thanks for answering my questions, i new in shooting recurve and any information is very useful for me Thanks.

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